International Trade

  • February 13, 2024

    Ship Co. Seeks 5th Circ. Redo On $200M Award Enforcement

    A German shipowner has asked the Fifth Circuit to reconsider whether to enforce a $200 million arbitral award it won following a deadly chemical explosion on its vessel, saying it never had a chance to respond to the argument that ultimately led to the decision.

  • February 13, 2024

    Trade Court Backs Commerce's 4th Go At Taiwan Nail Duties

    The U.S. Court of International Trade backed the U.S. Department of Commerce's fourth try at defending its approach to calculating anti-dumping duties for Taiwanese steel nails, accepting the department's reasons for departing from academic literature calling for a different approach.

  • February 13, 2024

    Feds Defend Search Warrants In Sen. Menendez Bribery Probe

    The federal government shot back at a bid by U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez and businessman Wael Hana to nix gold bars and other evidence uncovered while pursuing its second corruption case against the New Jersey Democrat, arguing in an opposition brief Monday that the search warrants were complete and sufficiently narrow.

  • February 13, 2024

    Mallinckrodt Guts IP Suit Amid Oxide Rival's New Drug App

    A Delaware federal judge has dismissed 10 of the originally asserted 14 patents in pharmaceutical company Mallinckrodt's claims against a French industrial gas company over a generic version of its pediatric breathing disorder treatment, as Mallinckrodt filed an amended complaint adding two additional patents to the suit.

  • February 13, 2024

    DHS Trade Official Joins Squire Patton In DC

    A U.S. Department of Homeland Security official has joined Squire Patton Boggs LLP as the firm continues to focus on growing in the areas of national security, trade and international investigations.

  • February 12, 2024

    Canadian Admits To Aiding Illicit Russian Export Scheme

    A Canadian woman on Monday admitted to laundering funds from what prosecutors say was a scheme to evade U.S. sanctions by secretly exporting millions of dollars in sensitive technology to Russia, some of which has been used in the war against Ukraine.

  • February 12, 2024

    Data Flaws Justify Penalty Malaysian Bag Duties, Court Rules

    The U.S. Court of International Trade on Monday backed antidumping duties on Malaysian plastic bags, scrapping an importer's claims that the U.S. Department of Commerce had inconsistently penalized it for discrepancies with its production data.

  • February 12, 2024

    DC Circ. Probes FERC Review Of La. Natural Gas Terminal

    A D.C. Circuit panel on Monday questioned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's refusal to formally characterize a Louisiana liquefied natural gas export terminal's contributions to climate change, with one judge indicating that regulators' reluctance to make determinations creates unnecessary challenges in deciding the project's fate.

  • February 12, 2024

    Trucker Tracking Startup Delivers Patent Feud To ITC

    The U.S. International Trade Commission said Monday that it is soliciting feedback on a legal effort by a San Francisco startup that sells trackers to trucking companies to employ the agency in its patent infringement campaign against a local rival that sells similar devices.

  • February 12, 2024

    China Tariff Expansion Not Duty 'Modification,' Fed. Circ. Told

    The Trump administration knowingly disregarded statutory language allowing tariff "modifications" when it enlarged duties covering Chinese goods from $50 billion to over $300 billion, importers challenging the program said in a Federal Circuit brief Monday.

  • February 12, 2024

    Investigator's Atty Wants Mogul Sanctioned In Hacking Suit

    A North Carolina attorney is pressing a federal court to impose a nearly $120,000 sanction for documents demanded of him by an airline tycoon in his hacking lawsuit, arguing the production request was an "undue burden" with an "exorbitant" financial cost.

  • February 12, 2024

    Biden Signs Law To Protect Servicemembers' Personal Info

    President Joe Biden signed into law a bipartisan bill that aims to protect the personally identifiable information of servicemembers when their private household goods are shipped internationally. 

  • February 12, 2024

    Newman Cleared To Fight Law In DC, But Not Suspension

    U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman may challenge the law she has been suspended under, but she cannot get an injunction that would allow her to hear cases on the Federal Circuit again, nor fight how the law has been directly applied to her, a D.C. federal judge said Monday.

  • February 09, 2024

    Lawmakers Want TikTok Parent Barred From Software Exports

    A group of lawmakers led by Republican Rep. Dan Crenshaw and Democrat Rep. Josh Gottheimer have asked the Biden administration to add TikTok's parent company, ByteDance, to the U.S. Department of Commerce's foreign entity list and bar the transfer of U.S. software to the company.

  • February 09, 2024

    House Dems Press Army For Data On Ammo Production Deal

    Two House Democrats raised concerns Thursday that the U.S. Army wasn't tracking ammunition produced in a government-owned, contractor-run plant, saying without proper oversight, ammunition in that plant could wind up in the hands of a mass shooter.

  • February 09, 2024

    US Business Group VP Slams Tai's Digital Trade Stance

    The National Foreign Trade Council published an essay Friday bashing the U.S. Trade Representative as the odd one out on e-commerce policy among both U.S. lawmakers and international partners, broadcasting the business community's ongoing frustration with the Biden administration.

  • February 09, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Disputes Newman's Filing Alleging Listserv Cut

    In response to Federal Circuit Judge Pauline Newman's filing alleging she has been cut from the circuit's judicial listserv, the other circuit judges on Friday told the court overseeing her lawsuit challenging her suspension that they "dispute both the accuracy and relevance of those legal and factual points" in her brief.

  • February 09, 2024

    Paper Co.'s 'Spin-off' Was Bid To Dodge $194M Debt, Feds Say

    The U.S. government has filed a new complaint in a feud with a German thermal paper producer over nearly $194 million in allegedly unpaid anti-dumping duties, accusing the company of trying to duck the debt by reconstituting itself.

  • February 09, 2024

    Industry Groups Call For Wider Effort To Stop Houthi Attacks

    More than 100 industry groups are calling for more governments to support military efforts to stop attacks on commercial vessels in the Red Sea by Yemen's Houthi rebels, which they said have disrupted at least $80 billion in cargo in recent months.

  • February 09, 2024

    ITC Says Foreign Glass Wine Bottles Seem To Be Hurting US

    All commissioners of the U.S. International Trade Commission voted Friday that wine bottles from Chile, China and Mexico are seemingly hurting the U.S. industry by way of unfair prices and subsidies by the Chinese government.

  • February 09, 2024

    Pea Protein From China Faces Early Duties Up To 280%

    Pea protein from China may face anti-dumping duties of between 122% to 280.31% based on preliminary findings of the U.S. Department of Commerce's investigation into whether the China-origin split pea extracts are being dumped into the U.S. at unfairly low prices.

  • February 09, 2024

    New Report Recommends IP Commercialization Task Force

    The National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship has told the Biden administration that it should direct the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to create a task force to commercialize federal technology intellectual property and provide more IP incentives for federally funded research.

  • February 09, 2024

    Sen. Dems Hail Biden Support On Humanitarian Aid Protection

    A group of Senate Democrats on Friday applauded the president's new directive to ensure that all recipients of U.S. military assistance comply with international law and agree not to block delivery of U.S.-supported humanitarian aid.

  • February 08, 2024

    VC Firms Accused Of Investing In 'Problematic' Chinese Cos.

    Qualcomm Ventures, Sequoia Capital China and three other American venture capital firms have collectively funneled more than $3 billion into "problematic" Chinese companies linked to human rights violations, the Chinese military and the "surveillance state," according to a report announced Thursday by U.S. lawmakers.

  • February 08, 2024

    Ex-Trump Aide Peter Navarro Can't Stay Free During Appeal

    A District of Columbia federal judge on Thursday refused to allow former White House adviser Peter Navarro to remain outside of prison while he appeals his sentence for refusing to comply with congressional subpoenas, rejecting Navarro's argument that his appeal raises a "substantial question of law" warranting his release.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

    Author Photo

    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

    Author Photo

    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

    Author Photo

    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • How US Companies Can Wield The New Foreign Bribery Law

    Author Photo

    U.S. companies operating in high-risk markets can use the Foreign Extortion Prevention Act that passed last month to their advantage both in preventing bribe demands and in negotiating with the Justice Department to prevent prosecution or to receive cooperation credit, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • 3 Areas Of Focus In Congressional Crosshairs This Year

    Author Photo

    Companies must prepare for Congress to build on its 2023 oversight priorities this year, continuing its vigorous inquiries into Chinese company-related investments, workplace safety and labor relations issues, and generative artificial intelligence, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Protections May Exist For Cos. Affected By Red Sea Attacks

    Author Photo

    Companies whose ships or cargo have been affected by the evolving military conflict in the Red Sea, and the countries under whose flags those ships were traveling, may be able to seek redress through legal action against Yemen or Iran under certain international law mechanisms, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • What's On Tap For Public Corruption Prosecutions In 2024

    Author Photo

    All signs point toward another year of blockbuster public corruption prosecutions in 2024, revealing broader trends in enforcement and jurisprudence, and promising valuable lessons for defense strategy, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Global Cartel Enforcement Looks Set To Intensify In 2024

    Author Photo

    The cartel enforcement winds may strengthen this year, with the U.S. Department of Justice, as well as regulators in other countries, placing a renewed focus on pursuing international cartels and more traditional, hard-core cartel conduct, say attorneys at Simpson Thacher.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

    Author Photo

    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • Time To Step Up PFAS Due Diligence In Cross-Border M&A

    Author Photo

    Regulations in the U.S. and EU governing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances will likely evolve to become global standards out of necessity and scale, so PFAS due diligence — particularly for buyers, sellers, and lenders and investors involved in multijurisdictional mergers and acquisitions — will be essential in 2024, say attorneys at Shipman & Goodwin.

  • 4 Questions On Groundbreaking New Foreign Bribery Law

    Author Photo

    The recently enacted Foreign Extortion Prevention Act will significantly alter the anti-corruption landscape under U.S. law by allowing prosecutors to pursue foreign officials for soliciting or accepting bribes, but it’s not yet clear how the statute will be used and by whom, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

    Author Photo

    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • 2 FCPA Settlements Illuminate Self-Disclosure, Disgorgement

    Author Photo

    Two of last year’s Foreign Corrupt Practices Act settlements — with biomedical company Lifecore and mining company Corsa Coal — suggest that the government will be much more flexible in negotiating disgorgement amounts if an entity voluntarily self-discloses misconduct, say Michael Gilbert and Lucas Amodio at Sheppard Mullin.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the International Trade archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!