International Trade

  • February 20, 2024

    5th Circ. Seeks Texas Justices' Input On LNG Permit Fight

    The Fifth Circuit has yanked its prior ruling that scrapped an emissions permit issued by Texas environmental regulators for a proposed liquefied natural gas terminal, saying it wants the state's Supreme Court to weigh in on how to define the best available pollution control technology under Texas law.

  • February 20, 2024

    WTO Says Revised Duties On Spanish Olives Still Out Of Line

    The World Trade Organization called on the U.S. to fix revised countervailing duties on Spanish olives, ruling Tuesday that the duties are still not in compliance with its 2021 decision rejecting the investigation that resulted in the tariffs.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ericsson, Lenovo IP Row Halted Amid Federal Probe

    A lawsuit alleging that Lenovo is infringing Ericsson's video technology was halted by a North Carolina federal court, which reasoned that a federal probe that will look into the same issues as the suit should be completed before the litigation can proceed.

  • February 20, 2024

    Akin Hires Top BIS Commerce Department Counsel In DC

    Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP has hired the former U.S. Department of Commerce's chief counsel for the Bureau of Industry and Security, who has joined the firm as a partner in Washington, D.C., the firm announced Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    International Trade Group Of The Year: Covington

    Covington & Burling LLP scored important wins across the international trade space last year, including shepherding bet-the-company deals through national security review, challenging fertilizer tariffs and guiding Seagate Technology LLC through a record-breaking export control settlement, earning the firm a spot among Law360's 2023 International Trade Groups of the Year.

  • February 20, 2024

    Navalny's Death Pushes Biden To Ramp Up Russian Sanctions

    The White House said Tuesday that it will introduce new sanctions on Russia later this week in response to Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny's death in custody, saying Russian President Vladimir Putin was ultimately responsible.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ransomware Group LockBit Hit By Coordinated Crackdown

    Two suspects linked to LockBit have been arrested and dozens of servers taken down as part of a global operation to disrupt the Russia-based ransomware group's activities, law enforcement agencies said Tuesday.

  • February 16, 2024

    Trade Dispute Reform Draft Emphasizes Mediation

    A draft agreement for overhauling the World Trade Organization's dispute settlement process circulated Friday proposes a new emphasis on the institution's alternatives to the formal litigation process that the U.S. has criticized as exclusionary and inefficient.

  • February 16, 2024

    You Want Judge Reyna To Have Coffee With Your Brief

    U.S. Circuit Judge Jimmie V. Reyna on Friday told intellectual property attorneys that the best way to establish credibility at the Federal Circuit is through a well-written brief, saying otherwise they put him in a bad position and deprive him of coffee.

  • February 16, 2024

    Canada Liable Under NAFTA For Axed LNG Project, Co. Says

    A U.S. company that invested at least $120 million in a since-thwarted liquefied natural gas project maintained that Canada is liable for $1 billion in damages for breaches of the North American Free Trade Agreement, and that the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes has jurisdiction over its claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    EU Launches First In-Depth Foreign Subsidy Probe

    The European Commission is launching an investigation into whether state assistance gave a Chinese train manufacturer a leg up in its bid for a Bulgarian government contract, the authority's first investigation under the European Union's new foreign subsidies regulation.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-FBI Field Boss Gets 28 Months For Foreign Payouts

    A former FBI field office supervisor was sentenced Friday to 28 months in prison for failing to disclose a $225,000 payment that he received from a former Albanian intelligence official while overseeing counterintelligence matters at the bureau.

  • February 16, 2024

    New IP Cases At ITC Plunged In 2023

    A new report about intellectual property shows that there was a "significant downturn" in cases at the U.S. International Trade Commission in 2023, according to an agency that represents expert witnesses for litigation.

  • February 16, 2024

    Quartz Biz Says Customs Charged Tariffs On Duty-Free Goods

    A quartz importer took U.S. Customs and Border Protection to court over its assessment of anti-dumping duties on dozens of quartz surface products that the U.S. Department of Commerce said should be imported duty-free.

  • February 15, 2024

    To Catch Crypto Crime, Look Offshore, Lawmakers Told

    Former regulators and prosecutors now employed by crypto-focused firms told U.S. House lawmakers Thursday that law enforcement needs additional power to go after offshore exchanges and other points where U.S. dollars enter and exit the digital asset economy in order to fight illicit finance in crypto.

  • February 15, 2024

    Biz Groups Urge Feds To Back WTO's Block On Digital Duties

    Major U.S. trade and business groups, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Foreign Trade Council, urged U.S. officials to back the World Trade Organization's suspension of tariffs on electronic transmissions ahead of a renewal vote later this month.

  • February 15, 2024

    State Dept. Offers $5M For Info On 'BlackCat' Ransomware Group

    The State Department is offering millions for information on the "BlackCat" ransomware, claiming that the AlphV cybercrime group has compromised over 1,000 entities globally.

  • February 15, 2024

    Biggest Tiremakers Sued Over Alleged Price-Fixing

    An Illinois tire buyer is piggy-backing off last month's European Commission raids of tire manufacturers in a new class action, alleging that the biggest players in the industry have been colluding to artificially inflate new replacement tire prices in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • February 15, 2024

    GSA Probed For Buying Banned Chinese Conferencing Cams

    The House Oversight Committee's Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Information Technology, and Government Innovation is probing the General Services Administration's purchase of videoconference cameras made in China following a recent report by the GSA's internal watchdog the subcommittee said raised alarming questions.

  • February 15, 2024

    Fla. Couple Get 57 Mos. For Evading $42M In Plywood Duties

    A Florida couple were sentenced to nearly five years in prison each after confessing to disguising the Chinese origin of millions of dollars' worth of plywood imports to avoid paying $42 million in import tariffs.

  • February 14, 2024

    Biden's OECD Pick Vows To Warren He'll Avoid Crypto Policy

    A former New York congressman who's been nominated to serve as the U.S. ambassador to a global economic development body has said he'll forgo working on crypto-oriented policy if he's confirmed to the job after Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D.-Mass, expressed concern over his work with cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase.

  • February 14, 2024

    What's Left Of Judge Newman's DC Suit Likely Won't Go Far

    A D.C. federal judge may be allowing suspended U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman to pursue a handful of arguments over the constitutionality of the Judicial Conduct and Disability Act, but attorneys told Law360 they aren't convinced those claims will fare any better than those already dismissed by the court.

  • February 14, 2024

    Telefonica Gets Win In $570M Busted Deal Dispute

    A New York state judge has said Spanish telecommunications company Telefonica SA is entitled to compensatory damages in a suit it launched against Millicom International Cellular SA over claims the mobile provider reneged on a $570 million deal to buy Telefonica's Costa Rican subsidiary.

  • February 14, 2024

    DOD Boosts Domestic Content Requirements For Contractors

    The U.S. Department of Defense finalized a rule Wednesday implementing the Biden's administration's increased domestic content requirements into its acquisition regulations, including DOD-specific requirements such as exceptions for countries in mutual defense trade deals with the U.S.

  • February 14, 2024

    Trucking Groups Score Win In Ocean Carriers FMC Dispute

    The Federal Maritime Commission has said that ocean carriers flouted U.S. law by requiring trucking companies to only use specific chassis providers to haul container cargo from certain ports in California, Illinois, Georgia and Tennessee, in a dispute related to pandemic-era supply chain logjams.

Expert Analysis

  • What's On Tap For Public Corruption Prosecutions In 2024

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    All signs point toward another year of blockbuster public corruption prosecutions in 2024, revealing broader trends in enforcement and jurisprudence, and promising valuable lessons for defense strategy, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Global Cartel Enforcement Looks Set To Intensify In 2024

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    The cartel enforcement winds may strengthen this year, with the U.S. Department of Justice, as well as regulators in other countries, placing a renewed focus on pursuing international cartels and more traditional, hard-core cartel conduct, say attorneys at Simpson Thacher.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • Time To Step Up PFAS Due Diligence In Cross-Border M&A

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    Regulations in the U.S. and EU governing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances will likely evolve to become global standards out of necessity and scale, so PFAS due diligence — particularly for buyers, sellers, and lenders and investors involved in multijurisdictional mergers and acquisitions — will be essential in 2024, say attorneys at Shipman & Goodwin.

  • 4 Questions On Groundbreaking New Foreign Bribery Law

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    The recently enacted Foreign Extortion Prevention Act will significantly alter the anti-corruption landscape under U.S. law by allowing prosecutors to pursue foreign officials for soliciting or accepting bribes, but it’s not yet clear how the statute will be used and by whom, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • 2 FCPA Settlements Illuminate Self-Disclosure, Disgorgement

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    Two of last year’s Foreign Corrupt Practices Act settlements — with biomedical company Lifecore and mining company Corsa Coal — suggest that the government will be much more flexible in negotiating disgorgement amounts if an entity voluntarily self-discloses misconduct, say Michael Gilbert and Lucas Amodio at Sheppard Mullin.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • Expect National Security Scrutiny Of Higher Ed To Continue

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    In 2023, the federal government significantly elevated the national security responsibilities of academic communities, so universities and research laboratories should take a more rigorous approach to research partnerships, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Antitrust And ESG: Maximizing Targets, Ensuring Compliance

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    Jennifer McAlpin at Verizon and Michaela Spero at Amadeus consider the convergence of antitrust and environmental, social and corporate governance factors, providing an executive overview of areas to watch, including mergers and acquisitions, as well as practical implementation tips for general counsel.

  • 4 Legal Ethics Considerations For The New Year

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    As attorneys and clients reset for a new year, now is a good time to take a step back and review some core ethical issues that attorneys should keep front of mind in 2024, including approaching generative artificial intelligence with caution and care, and avoiding pitfalls in outside counsel guidelines, say attorneys at HWG.

  • Bribery Settlement Gives Insight On DOJ Policies

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    Chemical company Albemarle’s recent $218 million settlement with the government to resolve foreign bribery claims provides valuable data points for companies on the U.S. Department of Justice’s voluntary self-disclosure policy and its clawback pilot program, say Michael DeBernardis and Tiauna Mathieu at Hughes Hubbard.

  • Opinion

    Waiving COVID-19 IP Protections Would Harm US Industry

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    President Joe Biden should turn down a World Trade Organization proposal to waive crucial intellectual property protections behind COVID-19 tests and diagnostics — protections that allow U.S. companies to sustain millions of jobs and develop life-saving treatments that benefit patients in every country, says former U.S. Circuit Judge Paul Michel, now at the Council for Innovation Promotion.

  • Fed. Circ. Patent Decisions In 2023: An Empirical Review

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    The Federal Circuit decided 306 patent cases last year, which is still well down from the pre-pandemic norm of around 440, and on the whole the court's decisions were markedly less patentee-friendly in 2023 than in 2022, says Dan Bagatell at Perkins Coie.

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