International Trade

  • February 01, 2024

    Oil Price Cap Coalition Outlines Top Evasion Tactics

    The countries behind the Russian oil price cap, or OPC, issued new guidance Thursday outlining the primary tactics used to evade the $60 per barrel limit, including the increasing use of byzantine corporate structures to hide prohibited transactions.

  • February 01, 2024

    Mexico Can't Confirm US Labor Claims At Fujikura Auto Plant

    Investigators from Mexico's Ministry of Labor and Ministry of Economy said Wednesday they can't verify U.S.-backed claims of labor rights violations and discrimination against former union organizers at an automotive plant in Piedras Negras, Coahuila.

  • February 01, 2024

    Biden Admin. Sanctions Israeli Settlers In West Bank

    President Joe Biden signed an executive order on Thursday imposing financial and visa restrictions on "extremist" actors in the West Bank, with the first round of sanctions being levied against four Israeli settlers found to have assaulted Palestinian civilians and Israeli activists. 

  • February 01, 2024

    Senate Confirms Commerce Dept. Alumna To Trade Court

    The Senate voted 53-42 on Thursday to confirm Lisa Wang, assistant secretary of commerce for enforcement and compliance in the U.S. Department of Commerce's International Trade Administration, to serve on the U.S. Court of International Trade.

  • February 01, 2024

    Court Faults Feds For Pegging Chinese Keg Duty To New Data

    The U.S. Department of Commerce abused its discretion by accepting new evidence to recalculate anti-dumping duties on Chinese kegs instead of using available data, the U.S. Court of International Trade said, ordering the tariffs to be redone once more.

  • January 31, 2024

    Auto Parts Co. To Pay $3M To End China Import Duty Probe

    An Oregon-based auto accessory manufacturer has agreed to pay $3 million to resolve allegations that it intentionally underreported certain duties owed on aluminum parts from China, defrauding U.S. Customs and Border Protection and illegally undercutting American competitors, federal prosecutors said Wednesday.

  • January 31, 2024

    Davis Polk, Latham Lead Amer Sports' Below-Range $1.4B IPO

    Amer Sports Inc., which owns the iconic brands Wilson tennis rackets and Louisville Slugger baseball bats, priced its initial public offering Wednesday at just under $1.4 billion, below its price range, represented by Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP and underwriters counsel Latham & Watkins LLP.

  • January 31, 2024

    Worker-Centered Trade Faces Headwinds From Lawmakers

    President Joe Biden's goal to recalibrate international trade to support middle-class jobs is facing headwinds following a series of trade negotiation setbacks, an exodus of high-level staffers, and now a congressional threat to his nomination of a deputy trade representative.

  • January 31, 2024

    Huawei Faces Civil RICO Suit From Netgear

    A major U.S. company is suing Huawei in California federal court under racketeering laws, arguing that the Chinese Communist Party-affiliated telecom giant is using infringement suits in Germany and China to demand "excessive and discriminatory royalties."

  • January 31, 2024

    Suit Says Oreo Maker 'Greenwashes' Deforesting And Child Labor

    The maker of Oreos and Clif Bars "greenwashes" its cocoa-containing food products with deceptive labeling that hides evidence of environmental degradation, child labor and child slavery in its supply chain, a proposed class action claims.

  • January 31, 2024

    Biden Climate Team Gains New Int'l Aide, EPA Air Leader

    In significant moves for the Biden administration's climate agenda, the White House on Wednesday said John Podesta will replace John Kerry as President Joe Biden's top international climate change policy adviser and the U.S. Senate confirmed Biden's pick to lead the Environmental Protection Agency's air office.

  • January 31, 2024

    Watchdog Calls For Written Guidance On Autos

    A government watchdog report Wednesday urged the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative to develop written guidance to better partner with other federal offices on the Interagency Committee on Trade in Automotive Goods, which provides advice on regional trade rules.

  • January 31, 2024

    Feds Urged To Adopt EV Battery Tracing For Tax Credit Rules

    A mechanism to trace the source of battery materials in electric vehicles would help enforce manufacturers' compliance with the domestic content requirements that are now linked to the EV consumer tax credit, stakeholders told U.S. Treasury Department and IRS officials Wednesday.

  • January 31, 2024

    US Tells Fed. Circ. Greece's $23M Arms Sale Suit Was Late

    Federal attorneys urged the Federal Circuit against reviving the Greek government's $23 million lawsuit over a decades-old arms sale, saying the claims court correctly determined that Greece had waited too long to file the case.

  • January 31, 2024

    Treasury Aims To Finish Credit Monetization Rules In 2024

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury aims to issue final rules this year on two new ways to monetize tax credits tied to clean energy construction projects, known as the direct pay and transferability methods, an official said.

  • January 30, 2024

    Ex-Pfizer Compliance Officer Revamps Whistleblower Suit

    A former Pfizer compliance officer said he endured harassment and discrimination before being fired in retaliation for reporting the pharmaceutical giant to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over concerns that it was potentially violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, according to an amended complaint filed in California federal court.

  • January 30, 2024

    Clorox, Brita Can't Beat Filter 'Patent Ambush' Antitrust Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Tuesday ordered that Clorox Co. and its Brita brand must face an antitrust lawsuit accusing the companies of engaging in a "patent ambush" to corner the market on home water filters, saying there is not enough overlap between the antitrust suit and Brita's patent infringement suit in Delaware to either dismiss or transfer venues.

  • January 30, 2024

    Trader Joe's Supplier Wins Contract Claim Over Bony Birds

    A Washington federal judge ruled on Tuesday that a poultry supplier breached its contract by selling a Trader Joe's chicken burger manufacturer a "boneless" shipment that contained bone fragments, while ruling that a jury should decide other issues in the supply chain suit, including whether the batch was wrongly characterized as "breast trim."

  • January 30, 2024

    VW Says Supplier Ignoring 8 Years Of Litigation In Germany

    Volkswagen is urging a Texas federal court to toss a case accusing it of keeping a stranglehold on its suppliers, saying it has already been embroiled in litigation in Germany for eight years with the company bringing the claims.

  • January 30, 2024

    4th Circ. Revives Combat IP Theft Suit Against Israeli Co.

    The Fourth Circuit on Tuesday revived an American combat training company's trade secret theft lawsuit against an Israeli company, its U.S. affiliate, a military officer and the Israeli Ministry of Defense, finding the trial court wrongly relied on a prior judgment, which didn't address the Delaware-based affiliate.

  • January 30, 2024

    WeChat And DHgate Listed On USTR's Counterfeiting Report

    The latest counterfeiting report from the U.S. Trade Representative on Tuesday found that Chinese platforms like WeChat and DHgate have continued to cost the U.S. billions of dollars through the sale of counterfeit products in 2023 and highlighted growing concerns about the promotion of fake products by social media influencers.

  • January 30, 2024

    Texas Co. To Pay Record $2M For False 'Made In USA' Labels

    Tractor maker Kubota North America Corp. will pay $2 million for labeling imported replacement parts as made in the United States in violation of the Federal Trade Commission Act, a record sum for such mislabeling.

  • January 30, 2024

    5th Circ. Tosses $200M Vessel Explosion Award Confirmation

    A Louisiana federal court couldn't confirm $200 million awarded to a German shipowner for a deadly chemical explosion on its vessel because MSC, the Swiss shipping giant liable for the disaster, doesn't have a connection to the Pelican State, according to a Fifth Circuit panel.

  • January 30, 2024

    Justices Urged To Review Nix Of FCA Sanction Evasion Suit

    A Wyoming company urged the U.S. Supreme Court to look into whether lower courts and the U.S. Department of Justice unlawfully snubbed its allegations that London's Standard Chartered Bank cleared roughly $56 billion in violation of U.S. sanctions targeting Iran.

  • January 30, 2024

    Global Anti-Corruption Fight Is Fizzling, Study Says

    Efforts to combat corruption in the public sector have stalled in the U.S. and globally while some developed countries, including the United Kingdom and Iceland, appear to be drifting backward, according to an annual study released Tuesday.

Expert Analysis

  • What's Ahead For Immigrant Employee Rights Enforcement

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s increased enforcement related to immigration-based employment discrimination is coupled with pending constitutional challenges to administrative tribunals, suggesting employers should leverage those headwinds when facing investigations or class action-style litigation, say attorneys at Jones Day.

  • What China's New Rare Disease Catalog Means For Drug Cos.

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    A new list of rare diseases released by the Chinese government may present opportunities for multinational developers of designated orphan drugs to take advantage of preferential policies including exemption from clinical trials, priority review and tax incentives, say attorneys at Zhong Lun Law Firm.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Cos. Must Monitor Sanctions Regime As Law Remains Unclear

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    While recent U.K. government guidance and an English High Court's decision in Litasco v. Der Mond Oil, finding that a company is sanctioned when a designated individual is exercising control over it, both address sanctions control issues, disarray in the law remains, highlighting that practitioners should keep reviewing their exposure to the sanctions regime, say lawyers at K&L Gates.

  • 4 Key Ways CFIUS Affected Private Equity In 2023

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    Sponsors and investment professionals should note how escalated enforcement by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States in 2023 affected private equity deal making and evaluate their CFIUS-related procedures in preparation for the regulator's reach to expand further next year, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • DOJ Officials' Remarks Signal New Trends In FARA Activity

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    Three U.S. Justice Department officials' remarks at a recent forum reinforce the department's renewed focus on aggressively enforcing the Foreign Agents Registration Act, which has been transformed into a significant national security and criminal enforcement tool, and its efforts to tightly regulate the activities of foreign agents in the U.S., say attorneys at Covington.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • 7 Enforcement Predictions For US Export Controls, Sanctions

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    Federal agencies' assertions of coming increases in export-control and sanctions-violations enforcement are not new, but recent improvements in resources and inter-agency cooperation allow for certain predictions about how the administration’s latest approach to enforcement may be applied going forward, say attorneys at Akin.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • What US-Canada Critical Minerals Collab Means For Cos.

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    Recent announcements from U.S. and Canadian officials indicate closer collaboration between the two governments on procurement of critical minerals for electric vehicles and other advanced technology — and companies on both sides of the border may have access to new opportunities as a result, say John Lushetsky, Matthew Simpson and Paul Dickerson at Mintz Levin.

  • Expect CFPB Flex Over Large Nonbank Payment Cos.

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    A recent enforcement action and a new rule proposal from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau indicate a growing focus on the nonbank payment ecosystem, especially larger participants, in 2024, say Felix Shipkevich and Jessica Livingston at Shipkevich.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • What New DHS Cybersecurity Policy Means For Bid Protests

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    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's recently unveiled policy of factoring cybersecurity self-assessments into its overall evaluation of contractors could raise novel bid protest considerations for offerors in both the pre-award and post-award contexts, say Amy Hoang at Seyfarth and Sandeep Kathuria at L3Harris Technologies.

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