International Trade

  • January 24, 2024

    EU Proposes New Foreign Investment And Trade Policies

    The European Commission adopted five policy proposals Wednesday aimed at reinforcing the European Union's economic security through new actions on foreign investment, outbound investment and sensitive technology.

  • January 24, 2024

    Bid To Swap Chevron For An Old Standby Raises Doubts

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court debated whether a World War II-era doctrine encouraging courts to strongly consider agency statutory interpretations could replace the court's controversial so-called Chevron doctrine that requires judges to defer to those interpretations if a statute is ambiguous.

  • January 24, 2024

    Orrick Brings In First-Chair IP Trial Lawyer From Venable

    Timothy Carroll joined Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP as a partner and first-chair intellectual property trial lawyer from Venable LLP on Wednesday, bringing his expertise in federal court and U.S. International Trade Commission trials to the firm's IP litigation practice, Orrick said.

  • January 24, 2024

    Staff Duped GSA To Buy Banned Chinese Cameras, IG Finds

    U.S. General Services Administration personnel gave a contracting officer "egregiously flawed information" so they would approve buying dozens of Chinese videoconference cameras, despite a federal law barring federal agencies from sourcing products from China, the agency's inspector general has reported.

  • January 24, 2024

    Family Tries To Revive Suit Over Cuban Port Property

    The former owner of land near the port of Mariel, Cuba, asked the Eleventh Circuit on Wednesday to revive its suit accusing Seaboard Marine Ltd. of "trafficking" in property seized by Fidel Castro's government, arguing that the district court had too narrowly interpreted the Helms-Burton Act.

  • January 24, 2024

    Feds Can't Pause Duty Evasion Suit For Evidence Review

    The U.S. Court of International Trade refused to pause an iron importer's lawsuit protesting a determination that it routed Chinese pipes through Cambodia to evade tariffs, saying the government's offer to let the importer review its evidence is unlikely to change the determination.

  • January 24, 2024

    Trade Court Says Oil Pipes Evaded Duties On China

    The U.S. Court of International Trade affirmed a U.S. Department of Commerce determination that oil pipes were minimally processed in Brunei and the Philippines to evade duties targeting China, rejecting two companies' contention that Commerce wrongly considered their manufacturing process.

  • January 23, 2024

    Australia, US, UK Sanction Russian Over Medibank Hack

    Officials from Australia, the U.S. and the United Kingdom revealed Tuesday that they had sanctioned a Russian national believed to have played an integral role in a 2022 cyberattack that hit Australian health insurer Medibank Private Ltd., marking the first time the three nations have made such a coordinated strike. 

  • January 23, 2024

    We Simply Must Investigate That Expert, ITC Says

    U.S. International Trade Commission lawyers say that a federal court ruling in 2023 preventing it from continuing to investigate a lawyer hired by Qualcomm for alleged violations of a protective order was "counterintuitive and troubling," and must be reversed.

  • January 23, 2024

    50 Cent Can Look At Ex-Liquor Boss's Assets For $7M Award

    A Connecticut bankruptcy judge is allowing rapper Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson's cognac company to examine assets belonging to its former brand manager, a move that could help the artist behind "In Da Club" recover a roughly $7 million judgment for claims accusing the now-insolvent ex-employee of stealing from the business.

  • January 23, 2024

    Wash. Firm Must Face Suit Over Lost $1M Escrow Fund

    A Spokane, Washington, firm must face claims that it mishandled $1 million of investor funds, a federal judge in the Evergreen State has determined, saying that although the investors were not law firm clients, "pleadings are sufficient to establish that plaintiffs' injury plausibly would not have occurred but for the acts and omissions of defendants."

  • January 23, 2024

    Commerce Expands Sanctions Against Russia, Belarus, Iran

    The U.S. Department of Commerce issued a final rule on Tuesday expanding and refining recent industrial and drone-related sanctions imposed on Russia, Belarus and Iran, citing Russia's "ongoing aggression" in Ukraine and Belarus and Iran's "complicity" with and support for that invasion.

  • January 23, 2024

    Estée Lauder Too Reliant On China Resellers, Investors Claim

    Luxury cosmetics company Estée Lauder was hit with a proposed class action alleging it concealed that stricter regulations on resellers in China were causing them to purchase fewer Estée Lauder products, which resulted in excess inventory throughout the supply chain and slowing sales at the company.

  • January 23, 2024

    Sen. Menendez Wants To Nix Gold Bars From Bribery Case

    U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez has asked a New York federal court to nix gold bars and other evidence federal prosecutors uncovered pursuing their second corruption case against him, suggesting the government weaponized unconstitutionally broad warrants to avenge a failed first attempt to convict the New Jersey Democrat.

  • January 23, 2024

    Oligarchs May Be Exploiting Art Facilities To Dodge Sanctions

    Facilities storing valuable artwork should be on the lookout for designated Russian individuals who may have squirreled away pieces in order to evade international sanctions, the National Crime Agency warned Tuesday.

  • January 22, 2024

    DC Circ. Mulls Enforcing $486M Award Against Djibouti

    The D.C. Circuit spent the better part of an hour Monday morning trying to sort out the intricacies of a dispute between the Republic of Djibouti and a Dubai-based state-owned shipping coordinator over a $486 million arbitral award.

  • January 22, 2024

    EU Steel Deal May Not Be In The Cards, Ex-GC Says

    Following the breakdown in negotiations with the European Union for the Global Arrangement on Sustainable Steel and Aluminum last year, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative was open to parting ways with Brussels in pursuit of a new status quo for global steel production, according to the former lead negotiator in the talks.

  • January 22, 2024

    Nestle Shopper Seeks Class Cert. In Child Labor Labeling Suit

    A shopper asked a California federal judge to certify multiple classes of Golden State consumers who challenge Nestle's "sustainably sourced" chocolate labels, arguing it knows its cocoa is sourced from farms "rampant with child labor and destructive environmental practices" and the dispute can be resolved on a classwide basis.

  • January 22, 2024

    Trade Court OKs Third Try At Russian Fertilizer Duties

    The U.S. Court of International Trade blessed Russian phosphate fertilizer duties that it had twice sent for reworking, finding that the U.S. Department of Commerce had sufficiently explained how it had calculated the financial benefits of certain phosphate mining rights.

  • January 22, 2024

    New US Sanctions Target Iraqi Airline And Hamas Financiers

    The U.S. Treasury Department on Monday imposed sanctions on Iraqi airline Fly Baghdad for allegedly helping Iran's Quds Force, and on Hamas-affiliated financial networks that the department said facilitated funds transfers, including cryptocurrency transfers, from the Iranian military unit to Hamas.

  • January 22, 2024

    WTO Reports Less Wheat In Suez Canal Over Red Sea Attacks

    Reports of cargo ship attacks in the Red Sea have caused wheat-carrying ships to avoid the Suez Canal, according to the World Trade Organization, which said wheat shipments through the canal fell nearly 40% over the past two weeks.

  • January 22, 2024

    US Co. Urges Fed Circ. To Yank Magnets' Duty-Free Status

    Magnum Magnetics Corp. urged the Federal Circuit to overturn a trade court's decision to back duty-free treatment on magnetic shelf dividers from China, arguing that the court unlawfully classified flexible magnets as being as inflexible as the products they were bonded to.

  • January 22, 2024

    Task Force To Tackle Global Carbon Pricing Framework

    A task force created by many of the largest intergovernmental organizations will hold its first meeting Jan. 30 to develop a global framework for carbon pricing that governments can use to compare policies, the World Trade Organization's director said Monday.

  • January 22, 2024

    Second Finnegan Alumnus Rejoins Firm In 2024

    Finnegan Henderson Farabow Garrett & Dunner LLP has rehired its second attorney of 2024, who first joined the firm as a summer associate more than a decade ago, the firm announced Monday.

  • January 22, 2024

    MoFo Adds Sanctions Expert From Deutsche Bank As Partner

    Morrison Foerster LLP has hired an expert in sanctions compliance as a partner to its national security group in London as the firm looks to bolster its practice during a period of geopolitical turmoil.

Expert Analysis

  • A Closer Look At The Sen. Menendez Indictment

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    Attorneys at Dowd Bennett analyze the latest charges filed against Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., and four co-defendants — from bribery to acting as a foreign agent — potential defenses that may be mounted, and broader lessons for white collar attorneys.

  • A Look At Enforcing And Contesting Arbitral Awards In Qatar

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    As Qatar aspires to become a regional investment hub as part of its Qatar Vision 2030, it has committed to modernizing its arbitration practices in accordance with international standards, including updating the process of enforcing and contesting arbitration awards, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • Deal Over Jets Stranded In Russia May Serve As Blueprint

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    In the face of a pending "mega-trial" over leased airplanes held in Russia after its invasion of Ukraine, a settlement between leading aviation lessor AerCap Holdings NV and NSK, the Russian state-controlled insurance company, could pave the way for similar deals, say Samantha Zaozirny and Timeyin Pinnick at Browne Jacobson.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • A Look At Successful Bid Protests In FY 2023

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    Attorneys at Sheppard Mullin look beyond the statistics in the U.S. Government Accountability Office’s recent annual report on bid protests, sharing their insights about nine categories of sustained protests, gained from reading every fiscal year 2023 decision in which the protester had a positive result.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Takeaways From Iran Missile Procurement Advisory

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    Companies should familiarize themselves with the entities and practices highlighted in the recent multiagency Iran Ballistic Missile Procurement Advisory, to avoid falling prey to deceptive practices that help bad actors evade sanctions, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • What Can Be Learned From 3M's Iran Sanctions Settlement

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    3M’s recent agreement to pay $9.6 million to resolve potential liability for violation of Iran sanctions provides insight on the complexity of U.S. sanctions compliance, the duration of enforcement actions by the Office of Foreign Assets Control, and the benefits and potential drawbacks of voluntary disclosure, says Thaddeus McBride at Bass Berry.

  • ITC Ban On Apple Watch Could Still Be Reversed

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    The U.S. International Trade Commission's recent final decision that the Apple Watch infringed two patents owned by Masimo Corp. was a rare instance of a popular consumer product being hit with an absolute importation ban, but it's possible that President Joe Biden could assert his power to reverse the ITC decision, says Benjamin Horton at Marshall Gerstein.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Inside The Current State Of International Crypto Compliance

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    A recent Financial Action Task Force report regarding adoption of international virtual asset compliance standards reflects a fairly grim state of affairs, but a broader look at providers' risk mitigation efforts and developments is encouraging, say Leah Moushey and Franco Jofré at Miller & Chevalier, and Meredith Fitzpatrick at Forensic Risk Alliance.

  • Putin Ruling May Have Unintended Sanctions Consequences

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    By widening the scope of control, the Court of Appeal's recent judgment in Mints v. PJSC opens the possibility that everything in Russia could be deemed to be controlled by President Vladimir Putin, which would significantly expand the U.K.'s sanctions regime in unintended ways, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Best Practices For Cos. Navigating US-China Investigations

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    Given recent enforcement trends and the broad jurisdictional reach of U.S. laws, companies with operations in China must enhance their compliance programs in order to balance new corporate enforcement expectations with Chinese data protection and privacy requirements, say attorneys at Paul Hastings.

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