International Trade

  • January 26, 2024

    Bills Aim To Halt Cash To Chinese Cos. Over Genetic Data

    Lawmakers on Capitol Hill have introduced legislation to block Chinese biotech companies from receiving federal funding if they have ties to the Chinese Communist Party, saying the goal is to prevent such companies and the party from stealing America's genetic data.

  • January 26, 2024

    Refrigerant Importers Get Chilly Reception In 11th Circ.

    The Eleventh Circuit appeared skeptical on Friday morning of arguments that several refrigerant importers had not waived their right to arbitrate claims that they fraudulently transferred assets to avoid paying damages awarded in a previous lawsuit to Chinese exporter T.T. International Co. Ltd.

  • January 26, 2024

    Biden Stokes LNG Uncertainty With Export Review Pause

    The Biden administration's pause of its approvals of liquefied natural gas exports to countries that don't have free-trade agreements with the U.S. will delay several projects and have potential customers question whether their supply agreements can ultimately be honored.

  • January 26, 2024

    Trade Judge Keeps Case Challenging CBP Duty Mistakes Alive

    The U.S. Court of International Trade has wiped the liquidated status off batches of Canadian lumber, rejecting U.S. Customs and Border Protection's contention that an exporter's failure to protest CBP's admitted mistake of erroneously deeming them liquidated had foreclosed the exporter's lawsuit.

  • February 08, 2024

    Law360 Seeks Members For Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is looking for avid readers of its publications to serve as members of its 2024 editorial advisory boards.

  • January 26, 2024

    US Paper Plate Cos. Accuse Asian Rivals Of Dumping Wares

    Domestic paper plate producers have called on U.S. trade officials to investigate rival imports from China, Thailand and Vietnam, alleging that producers abroad were using unfair trade practices to gain an edge in the U.S. market.

  • January 26, 2024

    EU Defends Latest Economic Sanctions Against Russia

    The European Union on Friday defended its new round of economic sanctions to be imposed on Russia against claims from the Kremlin that all EU sanctions are illegal and harm Europe and the world.

  • January 26, 2024

    Biden Admin Pauses LNG Reviews Over Climate Concerns

    The Biden administration on Friday said it would pause its approvals of liquefied natural gas exports to countries that don't have free-trade agreements with the U.S., and revise its export policy to greater account for LNG's impacts on climate change and energy prices.

  • January 26, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen Sainsbury’s Supermarkets face patent proceedings over a specific type of mandarin, Alexander Nix, the former chief of Cambridge Analytica, embroiled in further proceedings with Dynamo Recoveries, the sports management arm of Warner Bros raise a red card against crypto exchange Next Hash, and EY targeted in a libel claim by a consultancy firm. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • January 25, 2024

    Newman Suspension Row Should Stay In Fed. Circ., Judge Told

    U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman can't take her challenge of her Federal Circuit suspension to an outside judge, a D.C. federal judge heard Thursday as he considers if he has the authority to intervene in the circuit's investigation of the 96-year-old's alleged "significant mental deterioration."

  • January 25, 2024

    Lawmakers Push Back On Biden's Support For TRIPS Waiver

    A bipartisan group of federal lawmakers on Thursday said the Biden administration shouldn't endorse an expanded deal from years ago at the World Trade Organization that created an emergency COVID-19-related carve-out for patent rights.

  • January 25, 2024

    FERC Won't Halt Work On Texas LNG Export Terminal

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has said it won't pause authorized construction on a liquefied natural gas export terminal on the South Texas Gulf Coast, a decision a dissenting commissioner said perpetuates and magnifies injuries to environmental justice communities and ignores evidence of harm to public health and the environment.

  • January 25, 2024

    SEC Chair Urges Europe To Shorten Stock Settlement Times

    U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Chair Gary Gensler urged European counterparts Thursday to require one-day settlement for stock trading, saying it would ensure smoother functioning of markets as the U.S. and other countries move toward next-day settlements.

  • January 25, 2024

    ITC Blocks Imports Of TVs For Infringing AMD Patent

    The U.S. International Trade Commission has declared that a group of companies based out of China and other countries have flouted federal law by importing products like digital televisions that infringe a U.S. patent.

  • January 25, 2024

    Ex-Trump Aide Peter Navarro Sentenced To 4 Months In Prison

    Former Trump White House adviser Peter Navarro was sentenced to four months in prison on Thursday for refusing to comply with congressional subpoenas related to the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol.

  • January 25, 2024

    ITC Says Chinese Pressure Washers Harmed US Cos.

    The U.S. International Trade Commission unanimously found that domestic manufacturers are being injured by subsidized Chinese gas-powered pressure washers that are being sold in the U.S. at unfairly low prices.

  • January 24, 2024

    EU Proposes New Foreign Investment And Trade Policies

    The European Commission adopted five policy proposals Wednesday aimed at reinforcing the European Union's economic security through new actions on foreign investment, outbound investment and sensitive technology.

  • January 24, 2024

    Bid To Swap Chevron For An Old Standby Raises Doubts

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court debated whether a World War II-era doctrine encouraging courts to strongly consider agency statutory interpretations could replace the court's controversial so-called Chevron doctrine that requires judges to defer to those interpretations if a statute is ambiguous.

  • January 24, 2024

    Orrick Brings In First-Chair IP Trial Lawyer From Venable

    Timothy Carroll joined Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP as a partner and first-chair intellectual property trial lawyer from Venable LLP on Wednesday, bringing his expertise in federal court and U.S. International Trade Commission trials to the firm's IP litigation practice, Orrick said.

  • January 24, 2024

    Staff Duped GSA To Buy Banned Chinese Cameras, IG Finds

    U.S. General Services Administration personnel gave a contracting officer "egregiously flawed information" so they would approve buying dozens of Chinese videoconference cameras, despite a federal law barring federal agencies from sourcing products from China, the agency's inspector general has reported.

  • January 24, 2024

    Family Tries To Revive Suit Over Cuban Port Property

    The former owner of land near the port of Mariel, Cuba, asked the Eleventh Circuit on Wednesday to revive its suit accusing Seaboard Marine Ltd. of "trafficking" in property seized by Fidel Castro's government, arguing that the district court had too narrowly interpreted the Helms-Burton Act.

  • January 24, 2024

    Feds Can't Pause Duty Evasion Suit For Evidence Review

    The U.S. Court of International Trade refused to pause an iron importer's lawsuit protesting a determination that it routed Chinese pipes through Cambodia to evade tariffs, saying the government's offer to let the importer review its evidence is unlikely to change the determination.

  • January 24, 2024

    Trade Court Says Oil Pipes Evaded Duties On China

    The U.S. Court of International Trade affirmed a U.S. Department of Commerce determination that oil pipes were minimally processed in Brunei and the Philippines to evade duties targeting China, rejecting two companies' contention that Commerce wrongly considered their manufacturing process.

  • January 23, 2024

    Australia, US, UK Sanction Russian Over Medibank Hack

    Officials from Australia, the U.S. and the United Kingdom revealed Tuesday that they had sanctioned a Russian national believed to have played an integral role in a 2022 cyberattack that hit Australian health insurer Medibank Private Ltd., marking the first time the three nations have made such a coordinated strike. 

  • January 23, 2024

    We Simply Must Investigate That Expert, ITC Says

    U.S. International Trade Commission lawyers say that a federal court ruling in 2023 preventing it from continuing to investigate a lawyer hired by Qualcomm for alleged violations of a protective order was "counterintuitive and troubling," and must be reversed.

Expert Analysis

  • Takeaways From Iran Missile Procurement Advisory

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    Companies should familiarize themselves with the entities and practices highlighted in the recent multiagency Iran Ballistic Missile Procurement Advisory, to avoid falling prey to deceptive practices that help bad actors evade sanctions, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • What Can Be Learned From 3M's Iran Sanctions Settlement

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    3M’s recent agreement to pay $9.6 million to resolve potential liability for violation of Iran sanctions provides insight on the complexity of U.S. sanctions compliance, the duration of enforcement actions by the Office of Foreign Assets Control, and the benefits and potential drawbacks of voluntary disclosure, says Thaddeus McBride at Bass Berry.

  • ITC Ban On Apple Watch Could Still Be Reversed

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    The U.S. International Trade Commission's recent final decision that the Apple Watch infringed two patents owned by Masimo Corp. was a rare instance of a popular consumer product being hit with an absolute importation ban, but it's possible that President Joe Biden could assert his power to reverse the ITC decision, says Benjamin Horton at Marshall Gerstein.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Inside The Current State Of International Crypto Compliance

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    A recent Financial Action Task Force report regarding adoption of international virtual asset compliance standards reflects a fairly grim state of affairs, but a broader look at providers' risk mitigation efforts and developments is encouraging, say Leah Moushey and Franco Jofré at Miller & Chevalier, and Meredith Fitzpatrick at Forensic Risk Alliance.

  • Putin Ruling May Have Unintended Sanctions Consequences

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    By widening the scope of control, the Court of Appeal's recent judgment in Mints v. PJSC opens the possibility that everything in Russia could be deemed to be controlled by President Vladimir Putin, which would significantly expand the U.K.'s sanctions regime in unintended ways, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Best Practices For Cos. Navigating US-China Investigations

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    Given recent enforcement trends and the broad jurisdictional reach of U.S. laws, companies with operations in China must enhance their compliance programs in order to balance new corporate enforcement expectations with Chinese data protection and privacy requirements, say attorneys at Paul Hastings.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Compliance Primer: Foreign Investment In US Real Property

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    The rise in foreign investment in U.S. real property, especially agricultural land, has led to increased national security concerns, meaning it’s important to understand reporting requirements under the Agricultural Foreign Investment Disclosure Act and state-level statutes, and to monitor legislative proposals that could create more stringent reporting and review processes, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Bank's Penalties Highlight Key AML Compliance Expectations

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    Recently, Shinhan Bank America faced coordinated enforcement actions from federal and state financial agencies for ongoing, unremedied anti-money laundering compliance failures, revealing current areas of regulatory oversight and focus, including expectations that AML compliance data systems provide a 360-degree view of customers, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Avoiding Bribery, Corruption And Sanctions Risks In Int'l M&A

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    Given the evolving merger and acquisition landscape — as evidenced by the Justice Department’s recently announced safe harbor policy — acquirers conducting international transactions must build bribery, anti-corruption and sanctions risk considerations squarely into their due diligence processes, say Brian Markley and Jennifer Potts at Cahill Gordon.

  • Key Terms Of European Hydrogen Bank's 2023 Pilot Auction

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    The European Hydrogen Bank is a meaningful step in supporting production of green hydrogen within Europe, although its first auction round may not have the financial firepower needed to make major projects happen in Europe, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • How Int'l Regulatory Collabs Can Expedite Pharma Approvals

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    Recent announcements highlight the growing importance of international regulatory collaboration for drug approval, which can greatly streamline the process for companies seeking to market their drugs in other countries, say Geneviève Michaux and Christina Markus at King & Spalding.

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