Legal Ethics

  • April 03, 2024

    OneCoin Atty Gets 4 Years For Role In $4B Crypto Fraud

    The former head of legal and compliance at OneCoin on Wednesday was sentenced to four years in prison for her role in the $4 billion cryptocurrency scheme that defrauded millions of investors around the world.

  • April 03, 2024

    Netflix Libel Trial To Feature Full Central Park 5 Series

    Jurors will watch Netflix's entire four-part dramatization of the Central Park Five rape case and exoneration before deciding whether the series defamed a longtime top prosecutor in the Manhattan District Attorney's Office, a New York federal judge ruled Wednesday ahead of the trial.

  • April 03, 2024

    Trump's Late Immunity Motion Fails To Halt Hush Money Trial

    A New York judge on Wednesday rejected Donald Trump's effort to delay his hush money trial based on his claimed presidential immunity from criminal prosecution, keeping the historic case on track for jury selection later this month.

  • April 03, 2024

    UMich Says Law Prof's FMLA Leave Can't Prevent Discipline

    The University of Michigan told a federal judge Wednesday that a law professor's need for medical leave did not mean administrators couldn't discipline her for allegedly walking out on certain teaching responsibilities, rebutting her claims that the university's actions were because of her race or gender.

  • April 03, 2024

    White House Refuses To Call For Justice Sotomayor To Retire

    White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Wednesday that any decision by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor to retire is a personal choice for her alone to make, amid calls for the 69-year-old liberal justice to step down while President Joe Biden is in office and able to nominate her replacement.

  • April 03, 2024

    Judge Wary Of Atty's Bid To Cut Sentence For Hiding Assets

    A Seventh Circuit judge appeared skeptical Wednesday of an Illinois lawyer's contention that she should not have received an abuse-of-trust sentencing enhancement for helping her brother conceal more than $350,000 in bankruptcy assets, noting she deposited them in her attorney trust account and attempted to assert attorney-client privilege to hide her conduct from the trustee.

  • April 03, 2024

    Tort Report: Cert Bid For NY Gun Law; Insult Atty Update

    A high court challenge of New York's gun sales law and an update on disciplinary proceedings against an attorney who hurled insults at judges, calling them "scumbags," lead Law360's Tort Report, which compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news that may have flown under the radar.

  • April 03, 2024

    Sen. Durbin Urged To Pass Legislation To Curb Judge Shopping

    A coalition of more than 20 organizations have called on Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, to curtail the use of judge shopping through legislation and oversight because they believe more is needed beyond the Judicial Conference of the United States' latest action to curb "right wing" influence over the courts. 

  • April 03, 2024

    Conn. Atty Disbarred For Theft Seeks Early Reinstatement

    A former Connecticut attorney has asked the state bar to reinstate him after he was disbarred in 2016 following his conviction in connection with charges that he stole from his employer, requesting the bar set aside an order stating he must wait 20 years to apply for reinstatement.

  • April 03, 2024

    Atty May Be Disciplined Over Filing Cases For Media Attention

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday referred an attorney to her court's grievance committee over a pattern of filing cases to garner media attention and pressure defendants to settle quickly.

  • April 03, 2024

    Trump Ally Brings Ethics Query Over Judge's CNN Interview

    An ally of Donald Trump has raised ethics concerns about a senior D.C. federal judge, complaining that the judge's statements on CNN about the former president's statements about the judiciary was "highly prejudicial" toward Trump's four pending criminal cases.

  • April 03, 2024

    Ex-Saul Ewing Paralegal Gets 2 Years For $600K Fraud

    An Illinois federal judge sentenced a former Saul Ewing LLP paralegal to two years in prison for embezzling more than $600,000 from the firm's bankruptcy practice over nine years, which she used to make mortgage payments, buy a car and partially fund her son's college education.

  • April 03, 2024

    Oil Company Says Judge's Recusal Not Needed In Cartel Suits

    Pioneer Natural Resources Co. fired back at gasoline buyers' attempt to recuse a Nevada federal judge from the parties' antitrust litigation over her stock ownership in ExxonMobil Corp., arguing that the company isn't a party to the case, and that the litigation should be transferred to Texas.

  • April 03, 2024

    Judge's Recusal Not Needed In Indiana Hospital Fall Suit

    An Indiana appeals panel rejected a woman's bid to revive her suit over a trip and fall injury she suffered while taking her grandson to a hospital in Hobart, saying the fact the judge's son worked for the hospital's law firm does not show there was a conflict requiring the judge's recusal.

  • April 03, 2024

    Special Counsel Tells Judge Cannon To Rule On PRA Issue

    The special counsel prosecuting former President Donald Trump over the alleged mishandling of classified documents at his Mar-a-Lago estate told U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon that she needs to rule on Trump's argument that he was authorized under the Presidential Records Act to take the documents and cannot send the question of law to the jury.

  • April 03, 2024

    Houston Firm Ditches Proposed Data Breach Class Action

    A Texas federal judge threw out a proposed class action accusing Fleming Nolen & Jez LLP of waiting a month to disclose a cyberattack that exposed more than 100 clients' protected health information, citing the lead plaintiff's admission that she didn't even know if any of her data was compromised.

  • April 02, 2024

    Trump Wants New Bite At Recusal Over Judge's Daughter

    Donald Trump is again seeking the recusal of the judge overseeing his Manhattan criminal case, saying the judge's daughter and her political consulting firm stand to financially benefit from the case, while prosecutors argued Trump's "daisy chain of innuendos" isn't evidence that the judge, or his daughter, will gain anything.

  • April 02, 2024

    Judge Rides Denver Firm On Atty Fees In Elijah McClain Case

    A Colorado appellate judge pressed a Denver law firm Tuesday on how exactly it was entitled to millions of dollars in contingency fees in a high-profile civil rights suit after the mother of a slain man at the center of the civil rights case fired the firm before the case resulted in a $15 million settlement.

  • April 02, 2024

    DC Judge Grapples With Malice Claim In Nunes' WaPo Suit

    A D.C. federal judge on Tuesday questioned whether former California Rep. Devin Nunes had shown The Washington Post acted with actual malice in publishing a 2020 article that discussed the congressman, as the judge weighed the newspaper's bid for summary judgment in defamation litigation brought by Nunes.

  • April 02, 2024

    Backlash To 3rd Circ. Nom Could Hamper More Muslim Picks

    Only two Muslims serve on the federal bench, well below the prevalence of people practicing the faith within the U.S., and the recent travails of a third picked to serve on the court might bode ill for adding more.

  • April 02, 2024

    Crowell & Moring Attys Avoid Bias Fault In Army Deal Protest

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office denied a Virginia-based defense contractor's protest of a $192.7 million U.S. Army technical and engineering support deal but refused to fault Crowell & Moring LLP attorneys for representing the contractor despite conflict of interest allegations.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ex-NY Court Atty Says DA Has No Evidence Of Corruption

    A former appeals court attorney told a Manhattan jury Tuesday that the district attorney can't back up charges that she intended to benefit her husband when she gave a "basic, procedural fact" about the status of a case to his client.

  • April 02, 2024

    Amazon, Apple Buyers Defend Adding New Class Reps

    Attorneys for a proposed antitrust class action against Apple and Amazon say the tech giants are being unreasonable by trying to stop them from adding new class representatives to the case after the initial delegate stopped talking with his legal team.

  • April 02, 2024

    Feds Seek Use Of 'Intertwined' Evidence In NC Tax Fraud Trial

    Federal prosecutors have asked a North Carolina district court to permit tangential evidence in a tax fraud trial, saying that the evidence is "inextricably intertwined with the charged conduct" of two St. Louis attorneys and a North Carolina insurance agent.

  • April 02, 2024

    Conn. Firm Defends Infant Death Probe In Sanctions Feud

    A Connecticut firm is defending its investigation leading up to filing to a product liability lawsuit against two companies it claims produced and sold an infant lounger linked to a number of baby deaths, asking a Connecticut federal court to quash twin Rule 11 sanctions accusing it of pursuing frivolous claims.

Expert Analysis

  • 'Blind Side' Family Case Is A Cautionary Tale For Attorneys

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    Former NFL player Michael Oher's recent allegations against Sean and Leigh Anne Tuohy that they never legally adopted him and tricked him into conservatorship — which paint a very different picture than the 2009 film "The Blind Side" — demonstrate the importance of attorney due diligence and safeguards against abuse of process, says Roland Weekley at Smith Gambrell.

  • The Basics Of Being A Knowledge Management Attorney

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Michael Lehet at Ogletree Deakins discusses the role of knowledge management attorneys at law firms, the common tasks they perform and practical tips for lawyers who may be considering becoming one.

  • To Hire And Keep Top Talent, Think Beyond Compensation

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    Firms seeking to appeal to sophisticated clients and top-level partners should promote mentorship, ensure that attorneys from diverse backgrounds feel valued, and clarify policies about at-home work, says Patrick Moya at Quaero Group.

  • Ethics Issues For Mainland Firms Involved In Maui Fire Suits

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    Before law firms located outside of Hawaii represent clients affected by the Lahaina wildfires, they must be aware of local ethics rules and regulatory gray areas, as any any ethical missteps could have major ramifications for the firm's practice in its home jurisdiction, says Ryan Little at Klinedinst.

  • Perspectives

    More States Should Join Effort To Close Legal Services Gap

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    Colorado is the most recent state to allow other types of legal providers, not just attorneys, to offer specific services in certain circumstances — and more states should rethink the century-old assumptions that shape our current regulatory rules, say Natalie Anne Knowlton and Janet Drobinske at the University of Denver.

  • Identifying Trends And Tips In Litigation Financing Disclosure

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    Growing interest and controversy in litigation financing raise several salient concerns, but exploring recent compelled disclosure trends from courts around the country can help practitioners further their clients' interests, say Sean Callagy and Samuel Sokolsky at Arnold & Porter.

  • Attorneys Using AI Shouldn't Worry About Waiving Privilege

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    As large language models become more advanced, attorneys may be concerned that sending confidential data to companies like OpenAI risks waiving attorney-client or work-product privilege, but there’s nothing about such tools that would negate the reasonable expectation of privacy, say John Tredennick and William Webber at Merlin.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Elrod On 'Jury Duty'

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    Though the mockumentary series “Jury Duty” features purposely outrageous characters, it offers a solemn lesson about the simple but brilliant design of the right to trial by jury, with an unwitting protagonist who even John Adams may have welcomed as an impartial foreperson, says Fifth Circuit Judge Jennifer Elrod.

  • NJ Justices Clarify Bribery Law Scope, But Questions Remain

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    The New Jersey Supreme Court’s recent State v. O'Donnell decision clarified that the state’s bribery law unambiguously applies to candidates for public office, but there are still unresolved questions about how the ruling may affect lobbyists, undeclared candidates and political speech, says Scott Coffina at Pietragallo Gordon.

  • 4 Business-Building Strategies For Introvert Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Introverted lawyers can build client bases to rival their extroverted peers’ by adapting time-tested strategies for business development that can work for any personality — such as claiming a niche, networking for maximum impact, drawing on existing contacts and more, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Opinion

    3 Ways Justices' Disclosure Defenses Miss The Ethical Point

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    The rule-bound interpretation of financial disclosures preferred by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas — demonstrated in their respective statements defending their failure to disclose gifts from billionaires — show that they do not understand the ethical aspects of the public's concern, says Jim Moliterno at the Washington and Lee University School of Law.

  • Trump's 'I Thought I Won' Jan. 6 Defense Is Unlikely To Prevail

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    Since being indicted for his alleged attempts to overthrow the 2020 presidential election, former President Donald Trump’s legal team has argued that because he genuinely believed he won, his actions were not fraudulent — but this so-called mistake of fact defense will face a steep uphill battle for several key reasons, says Elizabeth Roper at Baker McKenzie.

  • Caregiver Flexibility Is Crucial For Atty Engagement, Retention

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    As the battle for top talent continues post-pandemic, many firms are attempting to attract employees with progressive hybrid working environments — and supporting caregivers before, during and after an extended leave is a critically important way to retain top talent, says Manar Morales at The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • How Judicial Privilege Shields Attys Facing Wiretap Violations

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    A recent ruling from the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania, as well as past rulings across the country, indicates that the judicial privilege is applicable to alleged violations of wiretapping laws, so attorneys presented with audio evidence beneficial to their case should not fear being sued, says David Scott at Kang Haggerty.

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

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