Massachusetts

  • February 29, 2024

    Harvard Faces Appeal Of Ruling Over Alleged Body Part Sales

    Families suing Harvard University over the alleged theft and sale of body parts donated to the institution's medical school on Thursday appealed a ruling that found the university was immune from all claims across a dozen related lawsuits.

  • February 29, 2024

    Amazon Seller Thrasio Seeks $360M DIP Facility In Ch. 11

    Thrasio Holdings Inc., which aggregates third-party brands for sale on Amazon, has urged a New Jersey bankruptcy court to sign off on an agreement the company struck with lenders to finance the consumer goods business' Chapter 11 case to the tune of $360 million.

  • February 29, 2024

    Hub Hires: Proskauer, Hogan Lovells, The SJC

    The shortest month of the year was a day longer this year and featured some significant Boston legal market moves, including a new member of the top court, a new finance attorney at Proskauer, and Hogan Lovells adding a longtime Foley Hoag partner.

  • February 28, 2024

    Au Pair Agency Can't Arbitrate Wage Claims, Judge Says

    Au pair agency Cultural Care has waived any claimed right to pursue arbitration in a proposed collective wage complaint by extensively litigating the case for several years, including a trip to the First Circuit, a Massachusetts federal judge concluded Wednesday.

  • February 28, 2024

    Green Groups Back Mass. Lobstering Closure To Save Whales

    Conservation groups told a Massachusetts federal court that an offshore seasonal fishing closure is critical to stop gear entanglements threatening nearly extinct North Atlantic right whales, urging the court to reject the lobster industry's move to block the restrictions.

  • February 28, 2024

    Construction Co. Boss Gets 9 Mos. For $1M Payroll Tax Fraud

    A Boston federal judge has sentenced the owner of two Massachusetts construction companies to nine months in prison for failing to pay more than $1 million in employment taxes over a decade.

  • February 28, 2024

    Equinox And Trainer Ignored Struggling Before Injury, Suit Says

    An Equinox personal trainer ignored a client whose struggle to complete a bench press led to a ruptured pectoral muscle, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday in Massachusetts.

  • February 28, 2024

    Mass. High Court Nominee Who Dated Gov. Confirmed 6-1

    A Massachusetts Appeals Court justice and former WilmerHale partner whose past relationship with Gov. Maura Healey raised concerns about potential conflicts of interest was confirmed 6-1 to a seat on the state's highest court on Wednesday, with several members of the Governor's Council dismissing those concerns.

  • February 28, 2024

    NuVasive Can Pierce Co. To Collect From Ex-Rep, Judge Says

    NuVasive Inc. can pierce the corporate veil to collect a $617,000-plus arbitration judgment it won against a company operated by one of its former sales representatives who improperly cut ties with the medical device company and violated his noncompete agreement, a Boston federal judge has ruled. 

  • February 28, 2024

    Major Amazon Seller Thrasio Enters Ch. 11 To Cut $500M Debt

    Thrasio Holdings Inc., a consumer goods company that is one of Amazon's largest third-party sellers, announced Wednesday that it entered Chapter 11 bankruptcy in New Jersey with the aim of cutting nearly $500 million in debt while bringing in more capital.

  • February 27, 2024

    TV Station Can't Kill Verizon Counterclaims In Carriage Fight

    A Rhode Island television station can't dodge counterclaims that it was the one responsible for letting Verizon know that it had been paying retransmission fees to the wrong company, the Massachusetts federal judge overseeing the TV station's lawsuit against Verizon and Nexstar has ruled.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ex-NESN Exec Gets 3½ Years In Fraud Scheme

    A former executive at the Massachusetts cable network that broadcasts Red Sox and Bruins games was sentenced Tuesday to 3½ years in prison for embezzling nearly $600,000 from his employer through an elaborate invoicing scheme, crimes a judge called both "deliberate" and "insidious" and the government called "brazen."

  • February 27, 2024

    Architect May Be Negligent, But He's No Liar, Court Rules

    An intermediate Massachusetts appellate panel ruled Tuesday that a home contractor could not show an architect acted with deception or dishonesty when he repeatedly questioned the company's billing during a $2.5 million home renovation project.

  • February 27, 2024

    PTAB Takes Up Challenge To Dyson Hair Dryer Patent

    An administrative patent board has decided to look into a petition from a Massachusetts home appliance brand that makes the case that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office should never have issued a patent to Dyson covering a kind of hair dryer.

  • February 27, 2024

    Mass. AG Sues Boston Suburb For Flouting Housing Law

    Massachusetts Attorney General Andrea Joy Campbell is seeking an injunction, fines or possibly the appointment of a special master to force the Boston suburb of Milton to comply with a state housing law requiring multifamily zoning that the town's voters rejected in a referendum earlier this month, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday.

  • February 27, 2024

    Cybersecurity Firm Says Reseller Stiffed It To Pay Other Bills

    Cybersecurity firm Acronis Inc. is accusing a reseller of using the proceeds from the sale of its products to pay off other financial obligations and ignoring its $1.5 million debt to Acronis, according to a lawsuit filed Monday in Massachusetts state court.

  • February 26, 2024

    Clement, Prelogar Odd Bedfellows In Social Media Showdown

    After GOP-led states targeted perceived stifling of conservative voices on social media, Monday's oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court could have featured predictable partisan fissures. But the case instead illustrated that legal ideology in the digital age is sometimes surprising.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Say Social Media Speech Laws Pose 'Land Mines'

    The U.S. Supreme Court seemed skeptical Monday of the constitutionality of Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on viewpoint, but struggled with whether the still-developing records in the lawsuits challenging the regulations could support a meaningful ruling on platforms' First Amendment rights.

  • February 26, 2024

    'Pig Butchering' Victim Slaps Binance, Ex-CEO With RICO Suit

    Binance and the cryptocurrency exchange's former CEO let criminal syndicates run fraud schemes through its platform by flouting laws against money laundering and money transmitting, according to an $8.1 million civil racketeering suit filed in Boston federal court.

  • February 26, 2024

    Boston Sued For Records Of White Supremacist Protest

    The city of Boston and two law enforcement agencies are flouting the state's public records laws to avoid scrutiny over what one expert called an "intelligence failure of significant proportions" during a march by an avowed white supremacist group in 2022, a lawsuit filed Monday by the National Lawyers Guild alleges.

  • February 26, 2024

    Mass. Judge Won't Rethink SEC Win On Adviser Duty Breach

    A Massachusetts federal judge has refused to reconsider a judgment against Commonwealth Financial Network that found it failed to disclose an arrangement with its clearing firm that favored certain mutual funds to investors, saying the company has not identified any new evidence or an error in the court's application of the law.

  • February 26, 2024

    Boston Moves To Settle Suit Over 2016 Police Shooting

    The city of Boston has reached an agreement in principle to settle a wrongful death lawsuit brought by the mother of a Black man who was shot to death by Boston police officers in 2016, according to a Monday filing.

  • February 26, 2024

    JetBlue, Spirit Tell 1st Circ. $3.8B Deal Is Good For Most Fliers

    JetBlue Airways and Spirit Airlines told the First Circuit on Monday that a $3.8 billion merger should not have been blocked because the judge who stopped the sale sought to protect a small, hypothetical subset of travelers to the detriment of the vast majority who stand to benefit from the deal.

  • February 26, 2024

    Teva Tells 1st Circ. Feds Must Clear High Bar In FCA Case

    Teva Pharmaceuticals told the First Circuit on Monday that the federal government should be held to — and cannot meet — a strict causation standard in a False Claims Act kickback case, asking the court to settle a matter of first impression in the circuit.

  • February 26, 2024

    Liberty Cuts Off Drivers' Rentals Too Soon, Suit Claims

    Liberty Mutual systematically and arbitrarily ends replacement transportation coverage after seven days for policyholders whose vehicles are totaled in collisions, in violation of its own policy language, a proposed class action alleges.

Expert Analysis

  • What Circuit Split May Mean For FCA Kickback Liability

    Author Photo

    The recent circuit split on the meaning of the resulting-from provision in False Claims Act kickback cases could have significant ramifications for FCA liability, as it could affect the standard of causation that plaintiffs must meet to establish liability, say former federal prosecutors Li Yu, Ellen London and Gregg Shapiro.

  • Perspectives

    More States Should Join Effort To Close Legal Services Gap

    Author Photo

    Colorado is the most recent state to allow other types of legal providers, not just attorneys, to offer specific services in certain circumstances — and more states should rethink the century-old assumptions that shape our current regulatory rules, say Natalie Anne Knowlton and Janet Drobinske at the University of Denver.

  • Identifying Trends And Tips In Litigation Financing Disclosure

    Author Photo

    Growing interest and controversy in litigation financing raise several salient concerns, but exploring recent compelled disclosure trends from courts around the country can help practitioners further their clients' interests, say Sean Callagy and Samuel Sokolsky at Arnold & Porter.

  • 10 Legal Subject Matters Popping Up In AI Litigation

    Author Photo

    The past five years have brought judicial opinions addressing artificial intelligence in many different legal areas, so a study of existing case law is an important first step for in-house counsel addressing how to advise on the uncertainty driving many of the AI legal disputes, says Mark Davies at Orrick.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Elrod On 'Jury Duty'

    Author Photo

    Though the mockumentary series “Jury Duty” features purposely outrageous characters, it offers a solemn lesson about the simple but brilliant design of the right to trial by jury, with an unwitting protagonist who even John Adams may have welcomed as an impartial foreperson, says Fifth Circuit Judge Jennifer Elrod.

  • Upcoming High Court ADA Cases May Signal Return To Basics

    Author Photo

    Recent cases, including Acheson Hotels v. Laufer, which will be heard by the U.S. Supreme Court in October, raise a fundamental question of whether Americans with Disabilities Act litigation has spiraled out of control without any real corresponding benefits to the intended beneficiaries: individuals with true disabilities, says Norman Dupont at Ring Bender.

  • 4 Business-Building Strategies For Introvert Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Introverted lawyers can build client bases to rival their extroverted peers’ by adapting time-tested strategies for business development that can work for any personality — such as claiming a niche, networking for maximum impact, drawing on existing contacts and more, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • FTC's 'Made in USA' Enforcement Goes Beyond Labeling Rule

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission's recent enforcement action against a group of businesses for falsely claiming that clothing was made domestically demonstrates that even where the agency's "Made in USA" labeling rule is not violated, other kinds of improper claims about products' origins can get companies in trouble, say Wrede Smith and Kali Yallourakis at McGuireWoods.

  • Opinion

    3 Ways Justices' Disclosure Defenses Miss The Ethical Point

    Author Photo

    The rule-bound interpretation of financial disclosures preferred by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas — demonstrated in their respective statements defending their failure to disclose gifts from billionaires — show that they do not understand the ethical aspects of the public's concern, says Jim Moliterno at the Washington and Lee University School of Law.

  • Series

    In A 'Barbie' World: Questions On Kid Brands In Gambling Ads

    Author Photo

    A recent "Barbie" film marketing partnership with a casino raised some eyebrows as the iconic children's toy brand was being used to promote gambling in possible contravention of advertisement regulations for adult activities, but the campaign's particularities signal that the shtick may comport with responsible ad principles after all, says Abbey Block at Ifrah Law.

  • Cannabis Plain Packaging Rules: Examples And Opportunities

    Author Photo

    States that have legalized adult-use cannabis in recent years have adopted stringent requirements for product packaging and labeling in an effort to protect minors, and these rules may provide a vehicle for compromise between proponents and opponents of legalization, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • What Courts' Deference Preference Can Mean For Sentencing

    Author Photo

    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Vargas decision deepens the split among federal appeals courts on the level of deference afforded to commentary in the U.S. sentencing guidelines — an issue that has major real-life ramifications for defendants, and is likely bound for the U.S. Supreme Court, say Jennifer Freel and Michael Murtha at Jackson Walker.

  • Caregiver Flexibility Is Crucial For Atty Engagement, Retention

    Author Photo

    As the battle for top talent continues post-pandemic, many firms are attempting to attract employees with progressive hybrid working environments — and supporting caregivers before, during and after an extended leave is a critically important way to retain top talent, says Manar Morales at The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • Opinion

    3 Principles Should Guide MTC's Digital Products Tax Work

    Author Photo

    As the Multistate Tax Commission's project to harmonize sales tax on digital products moves forward, three key principles will help the commission's work group arrive at unambiguous definitions and help states avoid unintended costs, say Charles Kearns and Jeffrey Friedman at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • How High Court Is Assessing Tribal Law Questions

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's four rulings on tribal issues from this term show that Justice Neil Gorsuch's extensive experience in federal Native American law brings helpful experience to the court but does not necessarily guarantee favorable outcomes for tribal interests, say attorneys at Dorsey & Whitney.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Massachusetts archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!