Massachusetts

  • February 21, 2024

    Mass. Landlords, Brokers Sued For Alleged Voucher Refusals

    A national housing advocacy group on Wednesday sued 20 Boston-area landlords and real estate brokers in state court, alleging they illegally refused to rent apartments to potential tenants with housing vouchers.

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices Squabble Over Emergency Review Of EPA Smog Plan

    The U.S. Supreme Court's liberal wing denounced during oral argument Wednesday their colleagues' decision to consider the merits of four related emergency requests to prevent the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from implementing a plan to reduce cross-state pollution without first getting lower court input.

  • February 21, 2024

    Boston Faces Suit Over Women's Soccer Stadium Project

    The city of Boston was slammed with a complaint in Massachusetts Superior Court by a nonprofit organization seeking to halt the city's pending privatization of the George Robert White Memorial Stadium in order to transform it into a women's professional soccer stadium.

  • February 21, 2024

    Mass. High Court Pick Challenged Over Past With Governor

    Massachusetts Gov. Maura Healey's pick for the state's highest court faced questions Wednesday about potential conflicts of interest arising from her past romantic relationship with the governor from members of the panel that votes to confirm judicial nominations in the state, a rare pushback by the Governor's Council.

  • February 21, 2024

    CoStar, Hotel Giants Accused Of Data-Driven Price-Fixing

    Hilton, Hyatt and other big name hotel operators are the target of a proposed class action alleging they colluded with hospitality industry analytics firm CoStar Group Inc. to fix prices in luxury hotel markets in Seattle and other major U.S. cities, according to a suit filed in Washington federal court.

  • February 21, 2024

    Morgue Manager's Wife Cops To Role In Body Part Sales

    The wife of a Harvard University morgue manager will cop to interstate transport of stolen goods for her role in the alleged scheme to steal and sell human remains to a nationwide network, prosecutors said Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Mass., Property Developer Strike Deal Over Wetlands Pollution

    The state of Massachusetts and a nationwide residential property developer have settled claims the company caused sediment runoff in wetlands in a town about 16 miles south of Boston, in violation of the Clean Water Act.

  • February 21, 2024

    1st Circ. Won't Revive $19M Casino Deal Suit Against Wynn

    The First Circuit affirmed the dismissal of a real estate executive's suit claiming Wynn Resorts reneged on a handshake deal to pay him $19 million for helping it obtain a casino license, pointing to an opinion from Massachusetts' top appellate court saying the agreement is unenforceable on public policy grounds.

  • February 21, 2024

    Feds Seek 5 Years Over Red Sox Network Exec's Billing Fraud

    Federal prosecutors are arguing for a prison sentence of more than five years for a former executive with the network that broadcasts Boston Red Sox and Boston Bruins games after he was convicted of stealing more than $575,000 from the company through a sham billing scheme.

  • February 20, 2024

    Crypto-Friendly Atty Challenges Warren For Senate Seat

    An attorney known for his pro-crypto views and criticism of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced on Tuesday a campaign to unseat incumbent and crypto critic Sen. Elizabeth Warren in the Massachusetts senatorial race.

  • February 20, 2024

    How Future Litigators Are Training In A 'Flight Simulator'

    Law students who would traditionally experience only a few courtroom scenarios over a semester have begun working with programs that can provide an entire array of courtroom curveballs, thanks to large language model artificial intelligence technology.

  • February 20, 2024

    Angry Buyer Told Machine Seller, 'I'll Kill You All,' Jury Hears

    Counsel for an Italy-based woodworking machinery manufacturer told an Atlanta federal jury Tuesday that their client's employees had been subjected to "profanity, and insults, and actual threats of physical violence" from a disgruntled customer who claimed his company had been sold a "lemon" of a high-tech wood cutting device.

  • February 20, 2024

    Warhol Faker Gets 37 Mos. As He Awaits Murder Trial

    A Massachusetts man who is awaiting trial for allegedly murdering his wife was sentenced Tuesday to just over three years in federal prison for a yearslong scheme to sell forged artworks purporting to be original Andy Warhol pieces.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Decline Malpractice Dispute Over $6M Settlement

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to hear the appeal of a Massachusetts legal malpractice suit in which Lubin & Meyer PC was accused, and cleared by a lower court, of pressuring a family into accepting a $6 million settlement that the family claims could have been higher.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Pass On Discrimination Suit Over Calif. Bar Exam

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to hear a Massachusetts patent attorney's suit alleging age discrimination is baked into the California bar exam.

  • February 20, 2024

    Pot Shop Says Trade Group CEO Bungled License Bid

    The leader of a cannabis industry trade group is being accused in a lawsuit of convincing the owner of a dispensary to invest in what he was promised would be a "guaranteed" license to operate another retail location, only to mishandle the process.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Denies Review Of Wrestler Attorney Sanctions

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to review a petition from an attorney seeking to vacate a $312,000 sanctions order over his representation of former wrestlers over brain injuries they suffered while working for World Wrestling Entertainment Inc.

  • February 20, 2024

    1st Circ. Backs Genzyme Win In Worker's Race Bias Case

    Genzyme Therapeutic Products LP saw its pretrial win in a discrimination case upheld by the First Circuit, which found that a Black manager did not offer enough proof to show that his poor performance review was the result of racial bias.

  • February 16, 2024

    Stop Trying To Relate To Jurors If You Liked Harvard: Judge

    A senior federal district judge from Oregon on Friday urged intellectual property attorneys to stop pretending they can connect with juries when their backgrounds at times make it impossible to do so.

  • February 16, 2024

    The Congressman Who Reps Cannabis Reform On Capitol Hill

    Rep. Earl Blumenauer speaks to Law360 about the prospects for Congress enacting marijuana reform, why he supports moving cannabis to Schedule III and some of the drug policy triumphs and setbacks in his home state of Oregon.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    DOJ Says $3M Antitrust Deal Doesn't Fix Commission Rule

    The U.S. Department of Justice urged a Massachusetts federal court to reject a proposed $3 million settlement in an antitrust class action alleging a multiple listing service's commission rule inflated fees, saying the deal "perpetuates the very same competitive concerns that trouble the current rule."

  • February 16, 2024

    Carl Icahn, JetBlue Strike Deal For 2 Board Seats

    JetBlue Airways said Friday it has reached a deal with Carl Icahn to place two of the billionaire's handpicked nominees on the JetBlue board, just days after Icahn unveiled a nearly 10% stake in the airline.

  • February 16, 2024

    Feds Tell 1st Circ. Mass. Wind Farm Approval Was Sound

    The federal government has said a Massachusetts federal judge properly dumped a challenge lodged by commercial fishing groups seeking to upend federal approvals of the Vineyard Wind project, telling the First Circuit that the record shows federal agencies thoroughly studied the project's potential impacts.

  • February 16, 2024

    Janssen FCA Claims Not Barred By Old Cases, Judge Says

    Prior litigation that referred to Janssen Biotech's marketing practices does not bar a False Claims Act complaint from moving forward because the earlier cases did not allege the same type of fraud, a Massachusetts federal judge ruled Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Workplace Speech Policies Limit Legal And PR Risks

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    As workers increasingly speak out on controversies like the 2024 elections and the Israel-Hamas war, companies should implement practical workplace expression policies and plans to protect their brands and mitigate the risk of violating federal and state anti-discrimination and free speech laws, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: A Strong Year For MDLs

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    While the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation granted even fewer MDL petitions last year than in 2022, hitting a 21st-century low, a closer look at the record-setting number of total actions encompassed within current proceedings reveals that MDL practice is still quite robust, says Alan Rothman at Sidley.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Perspectives

    Justices May Clarify Expert Witness Confrontation Confusion

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    After oral arguments in Smith v. Arizona, the U.S. Supreme Court seems poised to hold that expert witness opinions that rely on out-of-court testimonial statements for their factual basis are unconstitutional, thus resolving some of the complications created by the court’s confrontation clause jurisprudence, says Richard Friedman at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • Uncharted Waters Ahead For FCA Litigation In 2024

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    Following a year of significant court decisions, settlements, recoveries and proposed amendments, 2024 promises to be a lively year for False Claims Act actions and litigation, and one that will hopefully provide more clarity as FCA jurisprudence evolves, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • 3 Key Class Action Trends To Use As Guidance In 2024

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    Telephone Consumer Protection Act, privacy and false advertising class actions saw significant shifts last year — including a trend toward expanding the application of preexisting laws to current technologies — that businesses should keep in mind to navigate the class action landscape in 2024, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Opinion

    Anti-Kickback Statute Does Not Require But-For Causation

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    A proper interpretation of the Anti-Kickback Statute clearly indicates that but-for causation is not required for False Claims Act Liability, and courts that hold otherwise will make it significantly easier for fraudsters to avoid accountability, says Kenneth Capesius at Baron & Budd.

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