Media & Entertainment

  • March 28, 2024

    NBCUniversal, DeLorean Settle 'Back To The Future' TM Suit

    NBCUniversal Media LLC has settled a trademark infringement suit over royalty payments for its use of the iconic DeLorean DMC-12 sports car on "Back to the Future" merchandise, according to a notice filed Tuesday in California federal court.

  • March 28, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen investors target fraudsters who ran a fake film tax scheme, Barclays Bank sue privately owned Russian bank PJSC Sovcombank, easyGroup bring a trademark infringement claim against online casino TGI Entertainment for its "easybet" word sign, and a bioethanol fuel company hit high-profile individuals connected to the collapsed Elysian Fuels scheme. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • March 28, 2024

    Judge Nixes Aviation Atty's Defamation Suit Against Blogger

    A Connecticut federal judge has permanently dismissed a defamation suit brought by an aviation attorney against a Connecticut-based blogger and journalist, stating the claims are barred by the state's statutes of limitations and cannot be saved by equitable tolling arguments based on federal law.

  • March 27, 2024

    Amazon Can't Block DSA Ad Repository Requirements

    A European court reversed a ruling temporarily exempting Amazon from a set of regulations for large digital platforms, ruling Wednesday that — like Apple's App Store, Facebook and Instagram — Amazon will have to maintain a publicly available repository of advertising information, as mandated by the European Union's 2022 Digital Services Act.

  • March 27, 2024

    Kim Kardashian Accused Of Touting Fake Donald Judd Tables

    Kim Kardashian bought knockoff Donald Judd tables and chairs for her Skkn By Kim office space and then touted the furniture in a video to her 2 million YouTube subscribers as authentic pieces designed by the late artist, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday in California federal court.

  • March 27, 2024

    Roblox Needs To Face Calif. Law Claims Over Illegal Gambling

    A California federal judge on Tuesday allowed proposed class claims that the Roblox Corp. gaming company broke California unfair competition law and was negligent for luring minors to gamble to proceed, but tossed other claims brought under racketeering and New York business law.

  • March 27, 2024

    Video Streamer Escapes Crypto Token Holder's Fraud Suit

    A New York federal judge has permanently tossed a suit accusing video streaming service Open Props Inc. and its executives of misrepresenting to investors that it would become a decentralized blockchain network following the sale of its native cryptocurrency tokens.

  • March 27, 2024

    SEC Wins Nearly $1M Against Penny Stock Influencer

    A California man who used his large social media following to manipulate penny stock prices has been ordered to pay more than $917,000 by a federal judge who said the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission proved the influencer committed fraud by failing to tell his followers he was selling off the very same stocks he was urging them to buy. 

  • March 27, 2024

    Warner Bros. Beats Claim It Stole Idea For 2022 'Batman' Film

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday granted Warner Bros. and DC Comics separate wins in a suit accusing the entertainment giants of stealing a comic book artist's story idea for the 2022 movie "The Batman," finding it was actually the artist who exploited the Batman universe.

  • March 27, 2024

    TikTok Star Ordered To Pay $805K To Sony For Sampling Song

    A Texas federal judge on Wednesday ordered TikTok musician Trefuego to pay Sony Music Entertainment Inc. more than $805,000 for illegally sampling its licensed song "Reflections," but he denied Sony's bid for an injunction.

  • March 27, 2024

    Citing Warhol, 10th Circ. Undoes Netflix's 'Tiger King' Win

    The Tenth Circuit on Wednesday relied on last year's landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling in the Warhol case to set aside a fair use win for Netflix Inc. in a copyright suit brought by a former zoo employee who livestreamed the funeral of the husband of "Tiger King" star Joe Exotic.

  • March 27, 2024

    Travis Scott Says He Had No Duty Over Astroworld's Safety

    Rapper Travis Scott, the safety director of the 2021 Astroworld Festival and other defendants have asked a Texas judge to free them from a slew of lawsuits stemming from the concert's fatal crowd crush, with roughly two months until the first plaintiff is set to go to trial.

  • March 27, 2024

    Backers Of Trump-Tied SPAC Sue To Confirm Manager Purge

    Investors behind the sponsor of the special-purpose acquisition company that took Donald Trump's Truth Social public sued its managing member, seeking a declaration from the Delaware Chancery Court that they have validly removed him from his post and that he has no authority to act on their behalf.

  • March 27, 2024

    Netflix Owes Fees For Defense Tactics In Patent Trial

    Netflix has been ordered to pay attorney fees to GoTV Streaming LLC after making a last-minute switch of its defense at a patent trial last year in California federal court that resulted in a $2.5 million verdict against the streaming giant. 

  • March 27, 2024

    Make Sure Internet Stays Affordable, House Dems Tell NTIA

    A dozen House Democrats urged a key Biden administration official on broadband policy to ensure high-speed internet projects across the country lead to affordable service as a federal low-income subsidy draws to a close.

  • March 27, 2024

    Bungie, YouTuber Settle False Copyright Infringement Suit

    An online gamer has settled a lawsuit filed by video game developer Bungie Inc. after a Washington federal judge ruled earlier this month that the gamer illegally posed as a company employee and reported Bungie fans' YouTube videos as copyright violations, according to a court order Wednesday.

  • March 27, 2024

    Casino Beats Suit Over Diabetic Customer's Fall

    A now-shuttered floating casino that was moored in Lake Michigan can't be held liable for the fall of a longtime patron who injured her hip after tripping in a hallway that connected two boats, an Illinois federal court has ruled, finding the patron couldn't support any element of her premises liability claim.

  • March 27, 2024

    Disney, Florida District Reach Agreement On Land Use Suit

    The Central Florida Tourism Oversight District on Wednesday approved a settlement with Disney in its lawsuit over two land use agreements the company signed with a predecessor district for property surrounding the Walt Disney World theme park.

  • March 27, 2024

    City Leaders Nix Plan To Move Wizards, Caps To Virginia Site

    Plans for the NBA's Washington Wizards and NHL's Washington Capitals to move from the nation's capital to a $2 billion sports and entertainment complex in northern Virginia came to an abrupt halt Wednesday afternoon, when the city of Alexandria, Virginia announced that its negotiations with Monumental Sports & Entertainment and owner Ted Leonsis "will not move forward.''

  • March 27, 2024

    Troika Media Can Exit Ch. 11 After Settlement And Lender Sale

    Marketing firm Troika Media Group Inc. is set to exit bankruptcy before the end of the month after a New York bankruptcy judge Wednesday said he would approve its Chapter 11 plan to sell itself as a going concern and settle pre-bankruptcy legal disputes.

  • March 27, 2024

    Piracy Claims Against Bankrupt ISP Frontier Can Go Forward

    A New York bankruptcy judge Wednesday said a group of copyright holders can go to trial with claims internet service provider Frontier Communications is liable for failing to cut off customers who downloaded pirated music and movies.

  • March 26, 2024

    Meta Can't Escape Suit Over Collection Of Taxpayers' Data

    A California federal judge refused to release Meta from a consolidated class action accusing it of unlawfully collecting sensitive information from tax filing websites H&R Block, TaxAct and Tax Slayer, allowing state and federal wiretapping claims to move forward and permitting the plaintiffs to amend several deficient privacy allegations. 

  • March 26, 2024

    Columbia Beats Bulk Of Students' Ranking Stats Suit, For Now

    A New York federal judge on Tuesday largely threw out Columbia University students' proposed class action claiming the institution intentionally gave inaccurate data to U.S. News & World Report, but he also gave some of the former student plaintiffs the chance to tweak their complaint.

  • March 26, 2024

    FCC Urged To Require Unlocked Phones In T-Mobile-Mint Deal

    A collection of public interest groups is asking the Federal Communications Commission to attach new strings to T-Mobile's proposed $1.3 billion purchase of prepaid phone sellers Mint Mobile and Ultra Mobile, including a requirement that the carrier more quickly "unlock" its phones so they can be transferred between service providers.

  • March 26, 2024

    Don't Give ISPs Penalty-Free Buildout 'Amnesty,' FCC Told

    Broadband providers that default on their agreements to use federal funds to deploy service in rural areas shouldn't get a penalty-free pass on those commitments, even though it's critical to still provide those communities with funding, a rural cooperative has said.

Expert Analysis

  • What Prince Harry Privacy Case May Mean For Media Ethics

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    An English High Court recently allowed the privacy case brought by Prince Harry and six other claimants against the Daily Mail publisher to proceed, which, if successful, could embolden other high-profile individuals to bring claims and lead to renewed calls for a judicial public inquiry into British press ethics, says Philippa Dempster at Freeths.

  • Copyright Ruling A Victory For Innovation In Publishing Sector

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    The D.C. Circuit’s recent ruling in Valancourt v. Garland shows that demanding book copies without paying for them is arguably property theft, proving that the practice stifles innovation in the publishing industry by disincentivizing small printing companies from entering the market due to a fear of high costs and outdated government regulations, says Zvi Rosen at Southern Illinois University School of Law.

  • 3 Rulings Illustrate Infringement Hurdles For Hip-Hop Plaintiffs

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    Three district court decisions dismissing hip-hop copyright claims recently came down in quick succession, indicating that plaintiffs face significant hurdles when they premise claims on the use of words, phrases and themes that are common in the genre, say Benjamin Halperin and Shiara Robinson at Cowan DeBaets.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Mexico

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    ESG has yet to become part of the DNA of the Mexican business model, but huge strides are being made in that direction, as more stakeholders demand that companies adopt, at the least, a modicum of sustainability commitments and demonstrate how they will meet them, says Carlos Escoto at Galicia Abogados.

  • Deploying Analogies To Explore AI Copyright Questions

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    Xin Shao at F. Chau & Associates translates two representative artificial intelligence copyright cases into more traditional copyright law scenarios to facilitate the direct application of legal theories to undisputed technological facts.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • FTC Warning Letters Note 5 Mistakes For Influencers To Avoid

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    The Federal Trade Commission recently sent warning letters to two trade associations and 12 health influencers over their social media posts, offering insight into how the agency plans to enforce its updated endorsement guides and highlighting five concerns to keep in mind for marketing campaigns, says Gonzalo Mon at Kelley Drye.

  • Opinion

    A Telecom Attorney's Defense Of The Chevron Doctrine

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    The Chevron doctrine, which requires judicial deference to federal regulators, is under attack in two U.S. Supreme Court cases — and while most telecom attorneys likely agree that the Federal Communications Commission is guilty of overrelying on it, the problem is not the doctrine itself, says Carl Northrop at Telecommunications Law Professionals.

  • Seized Art Ownership Row Highlights Importance Of Vetting

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    The Cleveland Museum of Art's recent suit against the Manhattan District Attorney's Office to block a seizure order and contest its rightful ownership of a headless statue worth $20 million presents an uncommon challenge that underscores the criticality of due diligence prior to acquiring artworks, especially older pieces, say Robert Darwell and Zach Dai at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • 'Trump Too Small' Args Show Justices Inclined To Reverse

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently heard oral arguments in the "Trump Too Small" trademark case Vidal v. Elster — and the tenor of the justices' feedback makes it clear that the refusal to register a mark under the Lanham Act most likely does not violate free speech rights, as opposed to the Federal Circuit's decision last year, says Brian Brookey at Tucker Ellis.

  • What Cos. Should Know About FTC's Proposed Junk Fee Rule

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    The Federal Trade Commission recently announced a notice of proposed rulemaking targeting junk fees and how businesses may advertise prices to consumers — and since it would give the agency powers to seek monetary penalties against businesses that do not comply, companies should look to get ahead now, say Phyllis Marcus and Nicole Johnson at Hunton Andrews.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Opinion

    What 5th Circ. Uncrewed Aircraft Systems Ruling Got Wrong

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent ruling in National Press Photographers Association v. McGraw threatens to dilute the First Amendment rights of photographers using uncrewed aircraft systems and undermine federal control of the airspace, and is indicative of how other courts may misinterpret the Federal Aviation Administration's new fact sheet down the line, say attorneys at Wiley Rein.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

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