Media & Entertainment

  • February 08, 2024

    OpenAI Asks 11th Circ. To Uphold Fee Ruling

    OpenAI urged the Eleventh Circuit on Wednesday to uphold a federal judge's decision not to dock it attorney fees for attempting to remove a Georgia radio host's defamation lawsuit to federal court, saying it had "an objectively reasonable basis for removal."

  • February 08, 2024

    Norton Rose Fulbright Adds IP Partner From Kirkland

    Norton Rose Fulbright recently welcomed to its New York office an experienced intellectual property attorney who previously worked at Kirkland & Ellis and O'Melveny & Myers.

  • February 08, 2024

    Alex Jones Atty Calls Infowars 'Nonsense' In $1.4B Appeal

    Arguing in front of the shooting victims' families and squarely calling his client's broadcasts "nonsense," a lawyer for Alex Jones told the Connecticut Appellate Court on Thursday that $1.44 billion was too high a price for the Infowars website host's claims that the Sandy Hook school massacre was a "hoax."

  • February 08, 2024

    EU Says It's Not Debating Sanctions For Broadcaster Carlson

    The European Union is not currently discussing any sanctions against U.S. broadcaster Tucker Carlson for what the EU considers is the spreading of Russian propaganda, although each EU country may at any time propose possible media candidates for blacklisting, the European Commission said Thursday.

  • February 08, 2024

    NY Judge Scolds Trump Attys For Response To Perjury Query

    The New York state judge overseeing Donald Trump's civil fraud trial on Thursday chastised defense attorneys for their "misleading" response to his demands for information about reports of possible perjury by defendant and key trial witness Allen Weisselberg.

  • February 07, 2024

    X's 'Smear Campaign' Suit Doesn't Hold Up, Watchdog Says

    Media Matters for America has asked a Texas federal judge to toss a suit by X Corp., claiming it drove advertisers from the social media site via a "blatant smear campaign," arguing the complaint "fails in just about every way that a complaint can possibly fail."

  • February 07, 2024

    Dish's Bid For More Fees Called 'Nightmare' By Fed. Circ. Judge

    A Federal Circuit judge told counsel for Dish Network LLC on Wednesday that to secure more fees after the cable giant defeated a patent case in district court that was found to be "exceptional" to cover the costs of challenging the patent at the patent board would create "an effing nightmare."

  • February 07, 2024

    Unfriend $90M Facebook Privacy Deal, Objectors Tell 9th Circ.

    The Ninth Circuit heard Wednesday from various objectors who oppose a $90 million deal ending litigation accusing Facebook of unlawfully tracking logged-out users' browsing activity, with one attorney saying Facebook's due process rights wouldn't be violated if it were ordered to pay over $1 trillion in damages.

  • February 07, 2024

    Public Safety Orgs Fight FirstNet, AT&T Control Of 4.9 GHz

    The Federal Communications Commission is facing renewed calls from some public safety interests to maintain local public safety control of the 4.9 gigahertz band and reject a proposal that would let an AT&T-affiliated national entity manage the newly overhauled band.

  • February 07, 2024

    Skadden, Wilson Sonsini Steer Disney's $1.5B Epic Investment

    The Walt Disney Co., represented by Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP, and Epic Games, guided by Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati PC, announced Wednesday that they will collaborate on an "all-new games and entertainment universe," with Disney investing $1.5 billion to acquire an equity stake in the "Fortnite" maker.

  • February 07, 2024

    Video Game Effects Co. Ends Patent Suit With Ubisoft

    A Texas video game developer told a North Carolina federal court Tuesday it has agreed to end a lawsuit accusing French company Ubisoft of infringing a pair of patents, about a year after the patent owner lost an appeal in a similar case against Activision Blizzard.

  • February 07, 2024

    Mich. Judge Rips Romantics Singer For Copying Trial Brief

    A founding member of the Romantics will likely have a tough time regaining control of the band's finances after a Michigan appellate judge said Wednesday he couldn't condone the "incompetence" of the musician's trial attorneys, who filed a brief that was a copy of the opposing side's argument. 

  • February 07, 2024

    Trump Trial Judge Gets Little Info On Exec's Alleged Perjury

    An attorney for Donald Trump and his companies' former chief financial officer Allen Weisselberg told the New York state judge presiding over their civil fraud trial Wednesday that she could not respond to "unsubstantiated" reports that the ex-CFO was in plea negotiations for allegedly lying on the stand, citing her ethical obligations.

  • February 07, 2024

    FCC Says 10 Suits Filed Over Anti-Discrimination Rule

    The Federal Communications Commission notified a federal court panel on Wednesday of 10 appeals filed across half a dozen circuit courts challenging the agency's recently passed rules preventing discrimination in broadband deployment.

  • February 07, 2024

    FCC Republican Says 'Cyber Trust Mark' Needs Teeth

    For the Federal Communications Commission's Cyber Trust Mark — a label intended to signal that a device is secure from cyber interference — to have "teeth," companies need to be legally liable for any vulnerabilities that crop up after sale, one of the agency's Republican commissioners says.

  • February 07, 2024

    Facebook User Fights Uphill To Revive BIPA Case At 9th Circ.

    A Ninth Circuit judge on Wednesday told an attorney for a man alleging Facebook violated an Illinois biometric privacy law by storing an image of his face that he may agree a lower court's rationale for tossing the case was wrong, but said there might be other grounds for affirming the judgment.

  • February 07, 2024

    FTC Says Layoff Shows Microsoft Will Control Activision

    The Federal Trade Commission, which is appealing a district court's refusal to block the $68.7 billion acquisition of Activision Blizzard, told the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday that a plan to lay off 1,900 video game workers undercuts assertions of an independent post-deal Activision.

  • February 07, 2024

    Forbes Distributor Says Mexican Court Order Must Stand

    A distributor of Forbes magazine in Latin America is urging a New York court to nix the media company's bid to overturn a Mexican court injunction barring it from terminating their deal while the companies arbitrate a renewal dispute, saying the request is improper.

  • February 07, 2024

    Man Pleads Guilty In Journalist Harassment Case

    A man who was accused of participating in a vandalism scheme targeting two New Hampshire Public Radio journalists has reached a plea agreement, according to a filing Tuesday in Boston federal court.

  • February 07, 2024

    NBA, McCarter & English Roped Into Voyager Crypto Fight

    The fallout from the collapse of Voyager Digital Holdings Inc. has widened as investors in the bankrupt cryptocurrency exchange filed a proposed class action against the NBA and the law firm McCarter & English for their roles in boosting the company before its implosion.

  • February 07, 2024

    Alec Baldwin Trial Date Scrapped After Judge Shuffle

    Alec Baldwin's trial date in August has been nixed following a judge reassignment in the case against the actor, who is accused of involuntary manslaughter in connection with the on-set shooting death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins during the filming of "Rust" in New Mexico.

  • February 06, 2024

    Snoop Dogg Says Post, Walmart Sabotaged Cereal Brand

    Business partners Snoop Dogg and Master P claim Post Foods LLC worked with Walmart to prevent sales of "Snoop Cereal," despite signing a profit-sharing agreement to place the rappers' product on shelves next to Post's well-known cereal brands, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday in Minnesota state court.

  • February 06, 2024

    Musk's X Corp. Helps 'Star Wars' Actor Sue Disney Over Firing

    Actor Gina Carano, who played mercenary Cara Dune in the "Star Wars" spinoff series "The Mandalorian," claims Disney unlawfully fired her from the role in retaliation for posting her personal political beliefs on social media, according to a lawsuit filed in California federal court Tuesday with financial backing from Elon Musk's X Corp.

  • February 06, 2024

    1st Circ. Appears Unlikely To Deflate Balloon Fraud Verdict

    A defunct Massachusetts air balloon company on Tuesday struggled to persuade the First Circuit to throw out a fraud verdict by arguing that the jury had "rubber-stamped" a judge's damages estimate.

  • February 06, 2024

    LA Times Nears Fee Win After Beating Mark Geragos Libel Suit

    A California judge said Tuesday she will likely grant most of the Los Angeles Times' request for over $212,000 in attorneys' fees after defeating attorney Mark Geragos' libel suit over its coverage of a $37 million settlement, saying the case had "real implications" for the newspaper.

Expert Analysis

  • FTC Warning Letters Note 5 Mistakes For Influencers To Avoid

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    The Federal Trade Commission recently sent warning letters to two trade associations and 12 health influencers over their social media posts, offering insight into how the agency plans to enforce its updated endorsement guides and highlighting five concerns to keep in mind for marketing campaigns, says Gonzalo Mon at Kelley Drye.

  • Opinion

    A Telecom Attorney's Defense Of The Chevron Doctrine

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    The Chevron doctrine, which requires judicial deference to federal regulators, is under attack in two U.S. Supreme Court cases — and while most telecom attorneys likely agree that the Federal Communications Commission is guilty of overrelying on it, the problem is not the doctrine itself, says Carl Northrop at Telecommunications Law Professionals.

  • Seized Art Ownership Row Highlights Importance Of Vetting

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    The Cleveland Museum of Art's recent suit against the Manhattan District Attorney's Office to block a seizure order and contest its rightful ownership of a headless statue worth $20 million presents an uncommon challenge that underscores the criticality of due diligence prior to acquiring artworks, especially older pieces, say Robert Darwell and Zach Dai at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • 'Trump Too Small' Args Show Justices Inclined To Reverse

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently heard oral arguments in the "Trump Too Small" trademark case Vidal v. Elster — and the tenor of the justices' feedback makes it clear that the refusal to register a mark under the Lanham Act most likely does not violate free speech rights, as opposed to the Federal Circuit's decision last year, says Brian Brookey at Tucker Ellis.

  • What Cos. Should Know About FTC's Proposed Junk Fee Rule

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    The Federal Trade Commission recently announced a notice of proposed rulemaking targeting junk fees and how businesses may advertise prices to consumers — and since it would give the agency powers to seek monetary penalties against businesses that do not comply, companies should look to get ahead now, say Phyllis Marcus and Nicole Johnson at Hunton Andrews.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Opinion

    What 5th Circ. Uncrewed Aircraft Systems Ruling Got Wrong

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent ruling in National Press Photographers Association v. McGraw threatens to dilute the First Amendment rights of photographers using uncrewed aircraft systems and undermine federal control of the airspace, and is indicative of how other courts may misinterpret the Federal Aviation Administration's new fact sheet down the line, say attorneys at Wiley Rein.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: South Korea

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    Numerous ESG trends have materialized in South Korea in the past three years, with impacts ranging from greenwashing prevention and carbon neutrality measures to workplace harassment and board diversity initiatives, say Chang Wook Min and Hyun Chan Jung at Jipyong.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Young Thug Case Spotlights Debate Over Lyric Admissibility

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    A Georgia court’s recent ruling, allowing prosecutors to use some of rapper Young Thug’s lyrics in his conspiracy trial, captures the ongoing debate about whether rap lyrics are admissible, with courts often stretching the boundaries of the federal evidence rules, say Amy Buice at Smith Gambrell and Emily Ward at Continuum Legal Group.

  • Del. Dispatch: Refining M&A Terms After Twitter Investor Suit

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    The Delaware Court of Chancery's recent decision in Crispo v. Musk — invalidating a merger agreement provision that has been commonly used to disincentivize buyers from wrongful merger termination — should cause target companies to consider new approaches to ensure the payment of lost premium damages, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • First-Of-Its-Kind Artist AI Ruling Offers Liability Guidance

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    A California judge recently became the first federal judge in Andersen v. Stability AI to rule at the pleading stage on a challenge to claims that training artificial intelligence models involves mass-scale copyright infringement, providing insight into the potential legal exposure of AI-enabled products, say attorneys at Fenwick.

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