Michigan

  • April 17, 2024

    How Pro Leagues Are Grappling With Sports Betting Blues

    The NBA on Wednesday banned Toronto Raptors forward Jontay Porter for life for violating its gambling rules, making it the latest professional sports league to face betting-related problems in wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2018 decision striking down a federal law prohibiting states from legalizing sports betting. Here, Law360 looks at the recent sports betting issues, infractions and penalties that professional leagues have had to handle.

  • April 17, 2024

    Mich. Justice Warns Of Price Tag In School Liability Case

    A Michigan Supreme Court justice on Wednesday said a victory for a mother seeking to hold a school liable for her toddler's dangerous fall from bleachers could have far-reaching implications, potentially requiring expensive upgrades at public buildings across the state, including courthouses.

  • April 17, 2024

    Flagstar Bank Beats Overdraft 'Fee Maximization' Suit

    A Michigan federal judge has shut down a proposed consumer class action that accused Flagstar Bank of unlawfully charging millions of dollars in surprise overdraft fees, ruling that the bank had provided clarifying disclosures that left no more room for surprise.

  • April 17, 2024

    Fired Whistleblowers' Right To Sue Vital, Mich. Justices Hear

    A former Fiat Chrysler plant employee told a mostly quiet Michigan Supreme Court on Wednesday that state regulators should not be his only option for recourse after he was terminated, allegedly for reporting a workplace safety concern, arguing that Michigan workers will be hung out to dry if they can't bring their own lawsuits against employers.

  • April 17, 2024

    Racetrack's Unlisted Use Unremarkable, Mich. Justice Says

    A Michigan Supreme Court justice said Wednesday it was not "particularly remarkable" that a zoning ordinance did not list all approved commercial uses, as residents push the court to restrict a race dragway's operations, noting that the law uses examples because it would be impossible to list everything allowed.

  • April 17, 2024

    GOP Sens. Raise Ethical Concerns Over 6th Circ. Nominee

    Republicans went after a nominee for the Sixth Circuit during a hearing on Wednesday over allegations that he has behaved unethically as a prosecuting attorney, and that the White House picked him through a "backroom deal."

  • April 16, 2024

    Mich. Justice Questions Abuse Law's Missing Language

    A Michigan Supreme Court justice on Tuesday challenged an attorney for a victim of a 1990s sexual assault on why the state Legislature didn't explicitly include retroactive language for a 2018 change that allowed survivors of Larry Nassar's abuse scandal more time to bring civil suits, noting that the law was specific in other areas.

  • April 16, 2024

    Amazon Beats Suit After Injured Drivers Bury Medical Details

    Amazon can't be held liable in a personal injury lawsuit accusing an affiliate semitruck driver of rear-ending a family's vehicle, Michigan appeals court has ruled, saying it's not the court's responsibility to dig through a "huge stack of medical records" to find information favorable to the plaintiff.

  • April 16, 2024

    Mich. Justices Flag Bias Potential In Lost-Pay Damage Awards

    Michigan Supreme Court justices asked about double-dipping damages and whether implicit bias could skew projections of a child's lifetime earnings as they examined whether to back lost wages awards in wrongful death cases Tuesday.

  • April 16, 2024

    Ex-NBA Guard Gets 18 Months In Healthcare Scheme

    A former Detroit Pistons point guard was sentenced to 18 months in prison Tuesday after being convicted of one of two counts over an alleged scheme to defraud the NBA's healthcare plan, with a Manhattan federal judge saying his proceeds were "not chump change" and faulting his behavior on pretrial release.

  • April 16, 2024

    Ex-Mich. Speaker, Wife Charged With Embezzlement

    Former Michigan House Speaker Lee Chatfield was charged Tuesday with criminally misusing money from his nonprofit to pay for family trips and designer clothing while in office, as the state attorney general called on lawmakers to beef up Michigan's "worthless" campaign finance laws.

  • April 16, 2024

    Amway Parent Must Face Trial In Retirees' 401(k) Suit

    A Michigan federal judge refused Tuesday to totally free Amway's parent company from a class action accusing it of stacking its 401(k) with unwise investments and excessive fees, saying a jury should determine whether the company's investment review process was prudent.

  • April 16, 2024

    Buttigieg, State AGs To Probe Consumer Airline Complaints

    Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg on Tuesday announced a new partnership with Colorado and over a dozen other states to investigate consumer complaints about air travel, vowing to hold airlines and ticket agents accountable for excessive flight cancellations and unfair business practices.

  • April 16, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Rehear White Ex-Kroger Manager's Bias Case

    A former manager for Kroger will not get to argue his claims he was fired because he is a white man before the full Sixth Circuit, according to a new order, letting stand the appellate court's decision to dismiss the former manager's claims.

  • April 16, 2024

    Pot Transport Co. Can't Escape Overtime Suit

    A company specializing in secure transport of marijuana products didn't show that its drivers engage in interstate commerce and therefore can't escape a driver's misclassification suit seeking unpaid overtime, a Michigan federal judge has ruled.

  • April 16, 2024

    Atty Sanction's 'Chilling Effect' Worries Mich. Justice

    A Michigan Supreme Court justice asked Tuesday whether upholding sanctions against an attorney who joined a case after earlier frivolous litigation would scare away lawyers from agreeing to represent clients in those situations, echoing concerns shared by the plaintiff and defense bars.

  • April 16, 2024

    Arbitration Pacts Leave Domino's Wage Suit Plaintiff-Less

    An expense reimbursement dispute against Domino's can't go forward because it will be without a named plaintiff, as the four drivers who were supposed to step in are all bound by arbitration agreements, a Michigan federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • April 16, 2024

    AIG Unit Must Cover $20M Botched Tunnel Project, Court Told

    A Michigan county's water resources commissioner and sewage disposal system accused an AIG unit of failing to arbitrate their coverage claims over a design contractor's faulty work on a tunnel project, claiming they've suffered more than $20 million in damages.

  • April 15, 2024

    Gov't Says Mich. Court Lacks Authority Over U-Visa Delay Suit

    The federal government on Friday urged a Michigan federal court to toss a proposed class action alleging unreasonable decision delays in U-visa petitions, saying the court wouldn't be able to cure the visa-seeking plaintiffs' alleged harm of being unable to work.

  • April 15, 2024

    Judge Tosses 'Boilerplate' Infringement Suit Against OnStar

    OnStar LLC has escaped an infringement suit alleging it infringed a wireless company's patent for tracking vehicles after a Michigan federal judge said the wireless company did not properly describe its patent or allege how OnStar was misusing the technology.

  • April 15, 2024

    Mich. High Court To Hear Siblings' Ski Share Valuation Fight

    A sibling feud between the CEO of a family-run ski resort company and his sister, a minority shareholder, will get a hearing in front of the Michigan Supreme Court after the justices agreed to look at whether the company honored an agreement for redemption of shares in the family company.

  • April 15, 2024

    Detroit Court To Go All-Virtual During NFL Draft Week

    Michigan's Third Judicial Circuit is going virtual-only for court proceedings next week because the National Football League draft in downtown Detroit, and the hundreds of thousands of visitors expected to descend on the Motor City, will limit parking and access to the court building, the court announced Monday.

  • April 15, 2024

    Detroit Fire Safety 'Tax' Case Heads To Mich. Justices

    The Michigan Supreme Court will hear a challenge to Detroit's fire safety inspection fees, taking up an appeal from a pipe fitter's proposed class action alleging that the charges amounted to unlawful taxes.

  • April 15, 2024

    Michigan Court Funding In Spotlight As Contested Fees Expire

    Legislative gridlock could temporarily freeze Michigan judges' power next month to make convicted defendants pay for the costs of their prosecution, as lawmakers float reforms to what has been called a "broken" court funding system.

  • April 12, 2024

    TRO Won't Save Auto Supplier From Fallout, Judge Says

    A Colorado federal judge on Friday denied an auto part supplier's bid to force a business partner to follow through on an exclusivity deal, ruling that a temporary restraining order may not prevent the supplier from having to shut down a facility.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • GSA's Carbon-Free Power Plan: Tips For Electricity Suppliers

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    The U.S. General Services Administration's recent request for information concerning its intent to acquire a large amount of carbon pollution-free electricity over the next decade in the PJM Interconnection region offers key insights for companies interested in becoming electric power suppliers to federal government agencies, say Shaunna Bailey and Nicholas Dugdale at Sheppard Mullin.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Opinion

    States Should Follow Federal Lead On Expert Evidence Rules

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    The recently amended Federal Rule of Evidence 702 will help ensure expert testimony in federal courts reflects adequate data and reliable methods properly applied to a given case, and state courts — home to the overwhelming majority of U.S. litigation — should adopt similar changes, says retired attorney Michael Harrington.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • Opinion

    High Court Should Settle Circuit Split On Risk Disclosures

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    The U.S. Supreme Court should grant the petition for writ of certiorari in the Facebook case to resolve a growing circuit split concerning when risk disclosures can be misleading under federal securities laws, and its decision should align with the intent of Congress and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, says Richard Zelichov at DLA Piper.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

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    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

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