Michigan

  • March 06, 2024

    Antisemitism Org. Slams Ex-Hockey Player's Defamation Suit

    An antisemitism watchdog group has said it should not have to face a former University of Michigan hockey player's defamation suit for calling him antisemitic after the student was caught spray-painting offensive graffiti in front of the campus' Jewish cultural center, arguing the group's speech is protected by the First Amendment.

  • March 06, 2024

    Sports Illustrated Betting Platform To Be Shut Down

    The turmoil at Sports Illustrated continued Wednesday as its partner 888 Holdings PLC announced that it was terminating its sportsbook agreement with the brand's parent company, saying the scale of operating costs in the United States has made the venture untenable.

  • March 06, 2024

    Mich. Judges Skeptical Taking Photos Is Eavesdropping

    A Michigan appellate judge said on Wednesday that he was hesitant to interpret a decades-old eavesdropping statute to say that taking a photograph is the same as overhearing a conversation, in a union leader's attempt to go after a rival union for snapping a picture during his deposition. 

  • March 06, 2024

    Mich. Lawmakers Take Up Trial Court Funding Reforms

    Michigan lawmakers are considering legislation that would set in motion reforms to a major source of funding for the state's trial courts: fees imposed on criminal defendants.

  • March 05, 2024

    Court Has No Cause To Deny Casino Land Request, Tribe Says

    A Michigan tribe urged the D.C. Circuit to reverse a lower court's ruling blocking it from acquiring land for two casino developments, arguing there's no dispute it bought the land to generate gaming revenue and that the Supreme Court and Congress have recognized its endeavor.

  • March 05, 2024

    Pharmacist Takes Deal In Mich. Over Fatal Meningitis Outbreak

    The founder of a Massachusetts drug compounding center that was the source of a deadly meningitis outbreak has pled no contest to 11 counts of manslaughter brought by Michigan state prosecutors, the latter state's Department of Attorney General announced Tuesday.

  • March 05, 2024

    Security Co. Off The Hook For Guard Dozing During Auto Theft

    A Michigan state judge threw out a logistics company's suit accusing a contracted security guard of dozing off while eight of its vehicles were stolen, ruling the company never specified what exactly it wanted guards to do on the clock.

  • March 05, 2024

    Mich. Appeals Court Speeds Up Ford Battery Factory Dispute

    A Michigan appeals judge agreed Tuesday to fast-track a case brought by opponents of a planned $3.5 billion Ford battery plant who want to put a ballot question to voters in the next election.

  • March 05, 2024

    Judges Should Skip Most Law Firm Socials, Mich. Bar Says

    Michigan judges should avoid most law firm-sponsored events to avoid the appearance of impropriety, according to the latest ethics guidance produced by the State Bar of Michigan's Judicial Ethics Committee.

  • March 04, 2024

    Debtors Challenging Law Firm's Interest Rates Get Class Cert.

    A Michigan federal court has certified a class of debtors accusing creditor law firm Mary Jane M. Elliott PC of charging unlawfully high post-judgment interest rates on dozens of debt collection suits across the state.

  • March 04, 2024

    9th Circ. Rejects Abstention In Calif. Pot Permit Law Challenge

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Monday reversed and remanded a district court's decision to abstain from a challenge to Sacramento's social equity cannabis licensure program, saying even if a state court clarified the program's unambiguous residency requirements, it wouldn't change the outcome of the plaintiff's federal commerce clause claim.

  • March 04, 2024

    Judge 'Uncomfortable' In Tossing Man's No-Fly-List Suit

    A Michigan federal judge dismissed Monday a Lebanese-American businessman's lawsuit accusing several federal agencies of violating his fundamental rights by putting him on a secretive no-fly list, but the judge said the decision wasn't easy since the man couldn't face certain evidence.

  • March 04, 2024

    Mich. Defeats Challenge To Dead Voter Deletion Process

    A Michigan federal judge has tossed a nonprofit's suit claiming the state violated federal election laws by failing to remove deceased residents from its voter rolls, finding the state made thorough efforts to remove voters after they died.

  • March 04, 2024

    Electric Co. Must Face Claim It Kept Coal Partner In The Dark

    Consumers Energy Co. still faces potential liability for excluding a minority owner from a decision to shut down its last remaining coal-fired power plant in 2025, a Michigan state judge ruled Friday, while also narrowing the company's dispute ahead of trial.

  • March 04, 2024

    Chrysler Gets Claims Trimmed In Truck Fire Defect Suit

    A Michigan federal judge on Monday trimmed one plaintiff's breach of express warranty claims and all unjust enrichment claims from a suit against Fiat Chrysler alleging it sold vehicles with engines prone to overheating and catching fire.

  • March 01, 2024

    Cannabis Consulting Co. Says Clinic Owes $101K On Contract

    A laboratory and consulting firm that focuses on the cannabis industry alleged that a Michigan clinic owes the firm more than $100,000 for unpaid services, according to a lawsuit filed in Colorado federal court.

  • March 01, 2024

    Auto Coverage Hinges On Victim's Domicile, Mich. Panel Says

    A dispute over personal protection insurance will return to a trial court to determine whether a crash victim was residing in Michigan or Kentucky at the time of the incident, after a Michigan state appeals court granted neither the victim's guardian nor Progressive an early win.

  • March 01, 2024

    Mich. Wineries Crush Town's Live Music, Catering Bans

    A Michigan federal judge has again ruled that a township's bans on wineries hosting amplified live music and catering are preempted by state regulations, narrowing a long-running zoning dispute ahead of an April trial.

  • March 01, 2024

    Colo. Real Estate Brokerage Settles Data Breach Class Claims

    A proposed class settled a data breach lawsuit against a Denver-based real estate brokerage and property management company in Colorado federal court.

  • March 01, 2024

    Romantics Singer Can't Tune Out Atty's Copy-Paste Error

    A founding member of The Romantics can't regain control of the band's finances after his attorney mistakenly copied an opposing brief that said the singer should lose, a Michigan state appeals panel has ruled, because the lawyer had certified that she read the brief before filing. 

  • February 29, 2024

    Ousted Mich. GOP Leader Can't Halt Removal Ruling

    A state appellate court said Thursday it will not suspend an order forcing Kristina Karamo to step down as chair of the Michigan Republican Party while litigation over her removal plays out.

  • February 29, 2024

    Auto Co. Says $50M Policy Endorsement Covers COVID Loss

    An auto parts manufacturer is seeking $50 million in coverage for its COVID-19 pandemic-related losses in North Carolina federal court, claiming its policy's "unique" communicable disease provision was misrepresented when its insurer denied coverage for losses at its Indiana, Ohio, Michigan and North Carolina locations.

  • February 29, 2024

    Mich. Judge Floats Sanctions If Doc Review Wastes Her Time

    A Michigan federal judge on Thursday warned attorneys for a water engineering firm accused of prolonging lead exposure in the Flint water crisis not to waste her time by improperly withholding unprotected documents related to its public relations strategy around the case.

  • February 29, 2024

    Law Firm Recruited Objectors To Tank Vax Deal, Class Says

    Indianapolis-based law firm Kroger Gardis & Regas LLP is trying to unravel a settlement with Ascension Health Alliance because the firm wants to pursue its own class litigation, hospital staff told the Sixth Circuit in a brief filed Wednesday.

  • February 29, 2024

    Bankrupt Endo To Pay $465M To Resolve Opioid Claims

    Drugmaker Endo International has agreed to pay as much as $465 million to resolve criminal and civil claims stemming from its sale and marketing of a powerful opioid, and will turn over its assets to a group of secured lenders who will operate the company under a new corporate structure.

Expert Analysis

  • The Issues Brewing Around Starbucks Labor Practice Cases

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    Starbucks is faced with fighting off another push for a nationwide injunction against firing any employees that support unionization, and there's a distinct possibility that the company and the National Labor Relations Board could be fighting the same fight over and over in various locations, says Janette Levey at Levey Law.

  • Assessing EPA's Potential Retreat On Title VI Enforcement

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    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's decision to close its Title VI investigation of Louisiana — rather than respond to the state's litigation challenge against it — raises questions about the efficacy of the agency's plans to use Title VI in support of its environmental justice initiatives, say Susan Richardson and Jeffrey Davidson at Kilpatrick Townsend.

  • Immigration Program Pitfalls Exacerbate Physician Shortages

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    Eliminating shortcomings from U.S. immigration regulations and policies could help mitigate the national shortage of physicians by encouraging foreign physicians to work in medically underserved areas, but progress has been halted by partisan gridlock, say Alison Hitz and Dana Schwarz at Clark Hill.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • FLSA Collective Actions: Are Courts Still Dancing The 2-Step?

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    In the absence of amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act, courts have filled in some of the statute's gaps and established a two-step framework for conditional certification of a class, but recent rulings show signs that courts are ready to hold party plaintiffs to a higher standard if they want to recruit others to join their lawsuits, says Allison Powers at Barack Ferrazzano.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

  • The Legal Issues Flying Around The Evolving Drone Market

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    As the number of drone registrations is expected to more than double over the next three years, the industry faces new risks and considerations related to privacy, Fourth Amendment, criminal, evidentiary, First Amendment, and insurance litigation, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Opinion

    Supreme Court Must End Acquitted Conduct Sentencing

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    While all three branches of government have shown reluctance to address the issue of acquitted conduct sentencing, including the U.S. Supreme Court in its recent denial of certiorari in a case addressing the topic, the court must — as only it can — put an end to this unconstitutional practice, say Alan Ellis at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis and Mark Allenbaugh at Sentencing Stats.

  • Challenging Standing In Antitrust Class Actions: Timing

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    The early resolution of Article III standing disputes in antitrust class actions can result in sizable efficiencies, but some litigants and courts are improperly relying on the Amchem and Ortiz U.S. Supreme Court cases to defer standing issues until after ruling on plaintiffs' class certification motions, say Michael Hamburger and Holly Tao at White & Case.

  • Level Up Lawyers' Business Development With Gamification

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    With employee engagement at a 10-year low in the U.S., there are several gamification techniques marketing and business development teams at law firms can use to make generating new clients and matters more appealing to lawyers, says Heather McCullough at Society 54.

  • Mallory Ruling Leaves Personal Jurisdiction Deeply Unsettled

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    In Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway, a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court recently rolled back key aspects of its 2017 opinion in Daimler AG v. Bauman that limited personal jurisdiction, leaving as many questions for businesses as it answers, say John Cerreta and James Rotondo at Day Pitney.

  • 4 Legal Issues Grant-Funded Broadband Projects May Face

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    The Biden administration's recently announced funding allocations represent the largest ever government investment in broadband internet infrastructure, but these new development opportunities will require navigation of complicated and sometimes arcane legal environments, says Casey Lide at Keller & Heckman.

  • 5 Ways Firms Can Rethink Office Design In A Hybrid World

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    As workplaces across the country adapt to flexible work, law firms must prioritize individuality, amenities and technology in office design, says Kristin Cerutti at Nelson Worldwide.

  • False Ad Snapshot Shows Risks Of Geographic Origin Claims

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    A look at recent and historical cases involving deceptive use of geographic origin descriptors show that companies proclaiming they are American, but that sell products originating from outside the U.S., could be at risk under unfair competition laws or Federal Trade Commission enforcement, say attorneys at Carlson Gaskey.

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