Michigan

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Deny Chinese Co.'s Appeal To Whirlpool Injunction

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday denied a petition from a Chinese company to review a Fifth Circuit decision to temporarily bar it from selling its kitchen stand mixers because Whirlpool Corp. is alleging the products infringe the registered trade dress for its KitchenAid mixers.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Declines To Review Trump Attorney Sanctions

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Tuesday to review onetime Trump lawyer Sidney Powell's and six other attorneys' claims that they were wrongly sanctioned and referred for bar discipline for filing a frivolous challenge to Michigan's 2020 presidential election results.

  • February 16, 2024

    Mayer Brown Denies Knowing Of 'Disturbing' Flint PR Effort

    A Mayer Brown LLP partner representing Veolia North America, the water engineering firm facing negligence claims from children exposed to lead in Flint, Michigan, told a Michigan federal judge Friday that his team didn't know about Veolia's public relations campaign disparaging the children's counsel, a campaign the judge labeled a "disturbing development."

  • February 16, 2024

    6th Circ. Rejects FirstEnergy Objector's Appeal In $180M Case

    The Sixth Circuit on Friday rejected an appeal from a FirstEnergy investor who was holding up a $180 million settlement in a derivative suit seeking to hold the utility company responsible for its involvement in a $1 billion bribery scandal.

  • February 16, 2024

    PTAB To Review Engine Patent After Court Axed It

    The BMW brand has won a decision from the patent board to review the validity of a patented method for calculating the valve timing in a car engine, over half a year after a federal judge in Illinois ruled that the patent failed the U.S. Supreme Court's Alice standard for patent eligibility.

  • February 16, 2024

    Jewish Teacher Says Bias Suit Dismissal Flouted Case Law

    A Jewish middle school teacher who claims she faced unfair treatment at work due to her religion and repercussions for posting on Facebook about an assault by a student has urged a federal judge to rethink an early win granted to her school district against her retaliation and bias claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    The Congressman Who Reps Cannabis Reform On Capitol Hill

    Rep. Earl Blumenauer speaks to Law360 about the prospects for Congress enacting marijuana reform, why he supports moving cannabis to Schedule III and some of the drug policy triumphs and setbacks in his home state of Oregon.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fired Hospital Worker Can't Keep Fighting PTO Denial

    A maintenance worker who lost an administrative case alleging his ex-employer owed him money for unused paid time off when he was fired cannot try again to get a judgment in state court against the hospital where he worked or Michigan labor regulators, an appellate panel has found.

  • February 16, 2024

    Former Worker Says Supercuts Owner Cut OT Rate Too Short

    A former worker is accusing the owner of about 400 Supercuts, Cost Cutters and Holiday Hair salons in seven states of shortchanging its hourly employees on their compensation by not accounting for commissions and other non-discretionary bonuses in their overtime rate calculations.

  • February 15, 2024

    GM Tells 6th Circ. Unharmed Drivers Can't Be Certified

    General Motors urged the Sixth Circuit on Wednesday to reverse the certification of 26 classes of drivers who allege the automaker sold vehicles with defective transmissions, saying the district court "shirked" its duty to rigorously analyze issues before granting the certification.

  • February 15, 2024

    AGs Press FDA On Safeguards Against Metal In Baby Food

    Attorneys general from states across the country urged the U.S. Food and Drug Administration once again on Thursday to establish requirements that baby food producers test for lead and other metals in products headed for store shelves, citing a recent wave of childhood lead poisoning connected to recalled applesauce pouches.  

  • February 15, 2024

    Michigan Wants 1 Panel For 3 Appeals Of LGBTQ Rights Laws

    The Michigan Civil Rights Commission asked the Sixth Circuit to put three separate appeals brought by religious organizations objecting to the state's laws designating gender identity and sexual orientation as protected classes before the same merits panel, arguing that doing so would ensure judicial consistency.

  • February 15, 2024

    What Rescheduling Pot Would Mean For Criminal Justice Reform

    While federal drug enforcers mull a recommendation from health regulators to loosen restrictions on marijuana, criminal justice reformers are warning that rescheduling the drug would not realize President Joe Biden's campaign promise to decriminalize marijuana.

  • February 15, 2024

    GM Fuel Pump Class Can't Take Second Go At Multistate Cert

    A Michigan federal judge has ruled that drivers alleging General Motors sold them vehicles with faulty fuel pumps cannot toll some of their claims or try for a second round of certifying a multistate class, concluding that the "unusual" request was not supported by case law.

  • February 15, 2024

    Petition Watch: Classes, Litigation Changes & Fraud Theories

    The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of petitions for review each term, but only a few make the news. Here, Law360 looks at four petitions filed in the past three weeks that you might've missed, including questions over how courts should analyze class certification bids and regulations restricting specific speech for content-neutral reasons, whether plaintiffs must reestablish standing after amending lawsuits, and what constitutes fraud.

  • February 15, 2024

    Credit Repair Biz Urges Sanctions In Sales Reps' Firing Suit

    A credit repair services company being sued by a group of fired sales agents has called on a Michigan federal court to sanction them, saying their claim of not knowing if they had signed contracts with arbitration terms was an attempt to wriggle out of arbitration.

  • February 14, 2024

    Honda, Ford Push For Review Of New Wireless IP

    Honda is urging U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Director Kathi Vidal to vacate the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's decision not to review a Neo Wireless patent it had challenged, the same day Ford did the same.

  • February 14, 2024

    Atty Fighting Sanctions Not Blameless, Mich. Justices Told

    A Michigan defense attorney's arguments for why he should escape sanctions contain "several important inaccuracies and deficiencies," plaintiffs in an underlying real estate dispute have told the state Supreme Court in a brief, arguing that the attorney cannot escape being held jointly and severally liable along with previous defense counsel.

  • February 14, 2024

    Tech Overhaul Tops Mich. Courts' Budget Priorities

    The Michigan Supreme Court's chief justice testified Wednesday that uniting all trial courts on the same case management system is a top priority and the biggest project on the court's plate as she asked legislators for more funding to support the rollout.  

  • February 14, 2024

    Diocese Says Mich. Victims Can't Bring Decades-Old Claims

    The Roman Catholic Diocese of Lansing told the Michigan Supreme Court on Tuesday that a 2018 law extending the statute of limitations for sexual abuse claims doesn't apply retroactively, arguing parties would otherwise be forced to mount "nearly impossible" defenses of decades-old claims.

  • February 14, 2024

    SEC Says Bankruptcy Doesn't Stop Crowdfunding Fraud Case

    Securities regulators are urging a Michigan federal judge to allow them to press on with their claims against the alleged mastermind behind a $2 million crowdfunding scheme — who has since quietly changed his name and allegedly bilked his attorney — arguing that his recent bankruptcy filing shouldn't pause proceedings.

  • February 14, 2024

    Music Licensor Sues Restaurant For Performing Disco Songs

    A New York music licensor has hit a Detroit-area restaurant with a copyright suit over the unauthorized performance of three 1970s-era disco songs by artists like the Bee Gees and KC and the Sunshine Band, telling the Michigan court that it had reached out to the dining establishment over 50 times ahead of filing its claims.

  • February 14, 2024

    Mich. Health Co. Settles Payroll Outage Dispute For $325K

    A Michigan health system agreed to pay $325,000 to settle over 2,000 workers' claims for unpaid wages following the Kronos timekeeping system hack in 2021 and asked a Michigan federal court to approve the deal.

  • February 14, 2024

    Detroit Firm Adds 3 Attys, Including Ex-GM Software Engineer

    An intellectual property law firm in Detroit has recruited a trio of patent prosecution lawyers, including a former software engineer at GM and another lawyer who is going to lead the firm's new office in St. Louis.

Expert Analysis

  • 10 Years Of Retail Battles: Unpacking Pricing Litigation Trends

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    A close look at a decade of pricing class actions against retailers reveals evolving trends, plaintiffs bar strategies, and the effects of significant court decisions across states, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • 3 Significant Ohio Insurance Updates From 2023

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    The past year saw some significant changes and developments in Ohio's insurance coverage landscape, from new bad faith discovery mechanisms relating to out-of-state property to the Ohio Supreme Court's interpretation of what constitutes an assault or battery for coverage purposes, say Jenna Pletcher and William Peseski at Brouse McDowell. 

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • A Closer Look At The Federal Criminal Enforcement Slump

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    Former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, now at King & Spalding, explains that the U.S. Department of Justice’s statistical reports reveal that federal authorities are considerably less productive today than in the past, as criminal prosecutions fell in 2022 in every major category, for reasons that are not entirely clear.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • 5 Securities Litigation Issues To Watch In 2024

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    There is yet another exciting year ahead for securities litigation, starting with the U.S. Supreme Court hearing argument next week in a case presenting a key securities class action question that has eluded review for the last eight years, say attorneys at Willkie.

  • A Look At Consumer Reporting In 2023, And What's To Come

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    The legal landscape of consumer reporting is evolving as courts, federal regulators and state legislatures continue to weigh in — and while last year may have seen a slight downtick in the overall volume of Fair Credit Reporting Act litigation, 2024 is set to be a watershed year for this area of the law, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Evaluating Retroactivity Of Mich. Drugmaker Immunity Repeal

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    In assessing whether a new Michigan law lifting drugmakers' blanket immunity from product liability suits will apply retroactively, there are four key factors that Michigan courts will likely consider, say Sherry Knutson and Brenda Sweet at Tucker Ellis.

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