Michigan

  • February 01, 2024

    Michigan Co. To Pay $5M To Resolve Army Overcharge Claims

    A Michigan company will pay $5 million to the U.S. government to resolve a former employee's whistleblower claims it overstated pricing data for subcontractor work in a deal to manufacture armored vehicle upgrades for the U.S. Army, federal prosecutors announced.

  • February 01, 2024

    $25M Flint Water Crisis Deal Heads Off Impending Trial

    Flint residents and the last remaining engineering defendant in sprawling litigation over the city's water crisis announced Thursday they had reached a $25 million deal that would avoid an upcoming trial, with the engineering firm saying more than half of Flint residents will get a payout.

  • January 31, 2024

    6th Circ. Pushes Ford Buyer On Missing Claims In RV Suit

    A Sixth Circuit panel seemed unsure Wednesday about who should be responsible for alignment issues in a recreational vehicle built from a Ford Motor Co. chassis, questioning why a purchaser of the RV wants to wait until discovery is complete to zero in on when the alignment problems occurred.

  • January 31, 2024

    GM Execs Hid Driverless Tech And Airbag Concerns, Suit Says

    GM executives and directors have been hit with a shareholder derivative suit alleging they placed the company in legal jeopardy and harmed its share price by downplaying safety concerns about its Cruise autonomous vehicle technology and making misrepresentations about airbag safety.

  • January 31, 2024

    Michigan Justices Demur On Ambulance Mishap Case

    The Michigan Supreme Court has declined to review an appellate panel's finding in a patient's suit over an ambulance transport injury, saying the claims only raise questions of negligence and not an error of medical judgment.

  • January 31, 2024

    FedEx Pushes 6th Circ. To Reboot Contractor False Ad Fight

    FedEx urged a Sixth Circuit panel Wednesday to revive a lawsuit targeting an industry consultancy that the delivery company said tried to manufacture a crisis among FedEx contractors to drum up business for itself.

  • January 31, 2024

    Architect Says Steward Owes $2M For Work On Mass. Hospital

    Financially troubled Steward Health Care and its landlord owe nearly $2 million for architectural and other professional services on a project to replace one of its Massachusetts hospitals after a 2020 flood, according to a lawsuit filed in state court.

  • January 31, 2024

    Mich. Justices Send Tax Cut Duration Fight To Appeals Court

    The Michigan Supreme Court declined Wednesday to directly review a group of taxpayers' appeal of a judge's ruling that a 2023 personal income tax cut was only temporary, but it ordered the state Court of Appeals to rule on the case within six weeks.

  • January 31, 2024

    Mich. Hospital 'Didn't Do Its Job' For Deaf Patient, Judge Says

    A Michigan federal judge on Wednesday pressed counsel for Henry Ford Health System to explain why a deaf patient was not provided with any communication aids during a surgery, seemingly skeptical of the hospital system's defense that the chaos of the early pandemic justified the lapses.

  • January 31, 2024

    6th Circ. Mulls How To Filter Ageist Insults From Other Barbs

    The Sixth Circuit seemed hesitant Wednesday to reopen a suit from a General Motors engineer who said he was harassed and transferred to a job with fewer overtime opportunities illegally because he's over 50, with panel judges grappling with how to separate explicit age-based insults from other offensive conduct.

  • January 30, 2024

    Mich. Atty Ethics Board Won't Toss Trump Allies' Cases

    Michigan's attorney discipline board has said Trump-allied lawyers must face professional misconduct charges for challenging the results of the 2020 presidential election in the state, refusing again to toss the cases.

  • January 30, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs Antero's Win In Oil Royalties Breach Suit

    The Sixth Circuit affirmed on Tuesday a lower court's dismissal of a lessor's contract breach suit accusing Antero Resources of underpaying royalties under an oil-and-gas lease, finding the lessor failed to follow the lease's 90-day presuit notice requirement and "made no attempt to provide any prelawsuit notice at all."

  • January 30, 2024

    Fla. Jury Awards No Damages In Chrysler Headrest Trial

    A Florida federal jury on Tuesday decided that the Chrysler carmaker doesn't have to pay damages to consumers in the state who sued over alleged faulty automatic head restraints that inadvertently deployed while people were driving, but said the company violated the state's unfair trade practices law.

  • January 30, 2024

    Stryker Can't Slip California Workers' Wage Suit

    Medical device company Stryker cannot escape former workers' wage claims, a California federal judge ruled Tuesday, saying it was unclear whether the company was the workers' employer because it still retained some authority over workers employed by the company's subsidiaries.

  • January 30, 2024

    Tribe's Repeat Default Bids Disrespect Court, Blue Cross Says

    Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan says a Native American tribe's third request for a default win in its suit alleging the insurer overcharged for tribe members' care is disrespectful and constitutes a continued violation of a court order for the tribe to identify members involved in the insurance plan.

  • January 30, 2024

    Mich. Judge OKs $20M For Victims Of Faulty Fraud Algorithm

    A Michigan state judge signed off Monday on a settlement that will see the state's unemployment agency pay $20 million to people wrongly accused of fraud by an algorithm.

  • January 30, 2024

    Cannabis Co. TerrAscend Accused Of Retaliation

    A woman says she was hired by a cannabis company that was later acquired by TerrAscend Corp. around the time she developed a chronic medical condition, only to be fired after requesting accommodations, a Michigan federal lawsuit contends.

  • January 29, 2024

    Rocket Investors Want Class Cert. Despite Meme Stock Surge

    Rocket Mortgage shareholders said a social media-driven surge in the company's stock price shouldn't tank a class certification bid, because even during the so-called meme stock event, the stock price still reflected alleged misrepresentations about the mortgage lender's financial health.

  • January 29, 2024

    Mich. Residents Urge 6th Circ. To Preserve Lead Water Claims

    Residents of Benton Harbor, Michigan, urged the Sixth Circuit to reject city officials' request for qualified immunity in a class action alleging they misled the public about the safety of the city's drinking water.

  • January 29, 2024

    Insurer-Backed Docs Must Show Tax Records For Bias Check

    A split Michigan appellate court panel has said a car crash victim seeking coverage for his injuries can force the medical examiners hired by his insurer to turn over tax documents, finding the records are relevant to determine potential bias that couldn't be discovered otherwise.

  • January 29, 2024

    Kellogg Can't Flout Pension Guardrails, Retirees Say

    Kellogg retirees urged a Michigan federal judge to shoot down the cereal and snack foods company's argument that it has "carte blanche to shortchange employees" by using old data to calculate pension payments.

  • January 29, 2024

    Protein Bar Co.'s Insurer Says Supplier Ruined $3M In Product

    An insurer for a Pittsburgh-based protein-bar maker said the company lost $3 million due to plastic and paper contaminants found in collagen supplied by a Michigan-based company, according to a lawsuit filed in Pennsylvania state court Friday.

  • January 29, 2024

    OCC's Hsu Floats 'Chalk Lines' For Bank Merger Approvals

    The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency's acting chief on Monday unveiled a proposal to provide banks with a sketch of what the agency thinks a winning merger applicant does and doesn't look like, pitching the plans as a boon to bank merger review transparency while stirring industry doubts.

  • January 29, 2024

    Ex-Pistons Exec Faces 2nd Harassment Suit From Ex-Staffer

    A former Detroit Pistons employee who is already suing the team and a former top executive for sexual harassment in state court has lodged a nearly identical complaint in Michigan federal court, alleging a litany of inappropriate workplace conduct.

  • January 29, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A transportation services company and cryptocurrency fund both exited litigation, a grill maker and EV-charging company fired up new cases, and biotechs bandaged old wounds while judges fast-tracked a musical power struggle and unwound a REIT deal. All told, a typical week for Delaware's court of equity.

Expert Analysis

  • State Regs Sow Discord Between Cannabis, Hemp Industries

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    Connecticut, Maryland and Washington are the latest states choosing to require intoxicating hemp products to comply with the states' recreational marijuana laws, resulting in a widening rift between cannabis and hemp as Congress works on crafting new hemp legislation within the upcoming 2023 Farm Bill, say attorneys at Wilson Elser.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

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    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

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    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

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    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

  • How Law Firms Can Use Account-Based Marketing Strategies

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    Amid several evolving legal industry trends, account-based marketing can help law firms uncover additional revenue-generating opportunities with existing clients, with key considerations ranging from data analytics to relationship building, say Jennifer Ramsey at stage LLC and consultant Gina Sponzilli.

  • AGs' Distaste For Food Bill May Signal Other State Issues

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    States' recent opposition to a proposed federal law that would block them from regulating out-of-state agricultural production could affect issues beyond this narrow debate, such as the balance of state and federal regulatory power, reproductive rights post-Dobbs, and energy production and water use, say Christopher Allen and Stephen Cobb at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Strategic Succession Planning At Law Firms Is Crucial

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    Senior partners' reluctance to retire, the rise of the nonequity partner tier and generational differences in expectations are all contributing to an increasing number of departures from BigLaw, making it imperative for firms to encourage retirement among senior ranks and provide clearer leadership pathways to junior attorneys, says Laura Leopard at Leopard Solutions.

  • Autonomous Vehicles Must Navigate Patchwork Of State Regs

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    With only modest action by the federal government on the autonomous vehicle regulatory front in 2023, states and localities remain the predominant source of new regulations affecting AVs — but the result is a mix of rules that both help and hinder AV development and adoption, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Maximizing Law Firm Profitability In Uncertain Times

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    As threats of an economic downturn loom, firms can boost profits by embracing the power of bottom-line management and creating an ecosystem where strategic financial oversight and robust timekeeping practices meet evolved client relations, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Strategic Consulting.

  • Federal Policies Keeping Autonomous Vehicles In Slow Lane

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    In the first installment of this two-part article, attorneys at Faegre Drinker examine recent federal regulations and programs related to autonomous vehicles — and how the federal government's failure to implement a more comprehensive AV regulatory scheme may be slowing the progress of the industry.

  • Calif. Law Tests Noncompete Prohibitions' Potential Reach

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    California’s newly enacted law, which voids employee restrictive covenants, whether signed in or out of the state, has the potential to upend typical agreement negotiations, and highlights ongoing questions concerning how California's worker protections fare in other jurisdictions, says Sarah Tishler at Beck Reed.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds Attys That CBP Can Search Devices

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent Malik v. Department of Homeland Security decision adds to the chorus of federal courts holding that border agents don’t need a warrant to search travelers’ electronic devices, so attorneys should consider certain special precautions to secure privileged information when reentering the U.S., says Jennifer Freel at Jackson Walker.

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

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    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

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