Michigan

  • January 25, 2024

    Detroit Counsel Criticizes City Law Dept. In Biting Resignation

    Detroit's deputy corporation counsel said he was stepping down amid concerns the city's top lawyer was mismanaging the department, drawing attention to a state judge's recent dressing-down of the city for violating a court order.

  • January 25, 2024

    Shareholder Ends Del. Suit Over $1B Penske Stock Buyback

    Transportation services company Penske Automotive Group Inc. has resolved a shareholder's proposed Delaware Chancery Court class action against a controlling stockholder and the board of directors by implementing a voting agreement that moots the shareholder's claims, parties have said in court filings.

  • January 25, 2024

    Advisory Firm Asks 6th Circ. To Ax Insurer's Win In SEC Case

    An investment advisory firm argued Thursday that a Tennessee federal court erred in deciding that its insurance policy excluded coverage for an underlying suit from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, telling a Sixth Circuit panel that the exclusion rendered the policy illusory.

  • January 24, 2024

    Bid To Swap Chevron For An Old Standby Raises Doubts

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court debated whether a World War II-era doctrine encouraging courts to strongly consider agency statutory interpretations could replace the court's controversial so-called Chevron doctrine that requires judges to defer to those interpretations if a statute is ambiguous.

  • January 24, 2024

    Feuding Funkadelic Estate Fails To Rope In Royalty Co.

    SoundExchange, a major nonprofit royalty collector in the U.S., has slipped out of an ongoing dispute in Detroit federal court between Parliament-Funkadelic bandleader George Clinton and the widow of the band's founding keyboardist, Bernie Worrell.

  • January 24, 2024

    Ex-Adviser Agrees To Stop Stealing JPMorgan Clients

    A Michigan federal judge approved a stipulated injunction against a former JPMorgan wealth adviser who agreed not to solicit any clients from the company, after it accused him of stealing clients worth $40 million and "bad-mouthing" the firm since leaving in November.

  • January 24, 2024

    6th Circ. Questions If School Silenced Principal During Probe

    A Sixth Circuit panel had tough questions for both a former public school principal and her employer on Wednesday as the judges weighed whether the school imposed an unconstitutional gag order during an investigation into an alleged affair and misappropriation of funds.  

  • January 24, 2024

    LA District Atty Cuts $5M Deal In 'Election Deniers' Arrest Suit

    The Los Angeles Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved a $5 million deal to resolve an election-logistics software company's civil rights lawsuit, accusing L.A. County District Attorney George Gascón of relying on bogus claims by right-wing "election deniers" to falsely charge the company's founder with stealing poll workers' sensitive information.

  • January 24, 2024

    Auto Parts Supplier Ordered To Restart Deliveries Amid Dispute

    A Michigan federal judge on Tuesday ordered an auto parts supplier to resume deliveries to a manufacturer for Stellantis, ruling the supplier's price-hike demands would break its contract and disrupt the automotive supply chain.

  • January 23, 2024

    Auto Dealerships Get Last Of $385M In Car Parts MDL

    A Michigan federal judge on Tuesday gave the final go-ahead to a roughly $1 million deal between car sellers and brake manufacturers, in what the dealerships said was the final round of $385 million in settlements to end allegations of a conspiracy to manipulate prices for a host of auto parts across the U.S.

  • January 23, 2024

    Parents, Transportation Co. Resolve $16M New-Trial Dispute

    The parents of a man killed in an auto crash and the company the family sued have "resolved" their dispute over whether there should be a new trial after a jury awarded the family $16 million, a Michigan federal judge said.

  • January 23, 2024

    Mich. Taxpayers Ask State High Court To Cement Tax Cut

    A group of Michigan business associations, residents and Republican lawmakers urged the state Supreme Court on Tuesday to directly hear their appeal of a judge's ruling that a 2023 personal income tax rate cut was only temporary.

  • January 23, 2024

    6th Circ. Rejects PREP Act Immunity For Doc In Med Mal Suit

    A doctor and medical provider can't ditch a woman's suit over an abdominal bleed that necessitated emergency surgery on the basis of immunity under the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act, a Sixth Circuit appellate panel has found, saying the suit doesn't back their claim that they treated the patient due to a COVID-19 vaccine side effect.

  • January 23, 2024

    ​​​​​​​'Two-Step' Bankruptcies Abuse Law, AGs Tell Justices

    Attorneys general from 24 states and the District of Columbia told the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday that divisional mergers that manufacture jurisdiction for bankruptcy purposes shouldn't be allowed, writing in an amicus brief that Georgia-Pacific asbestos unit Bestwall employed the tactic to shield the parent from liability.

  • January 23, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Whistleblower Really Fired For 'Coup' Attempt

    A Sixth Circuit panel found Monday that a medical device company fired its president's son not because he ratted out his stepmother to the IRS, but because he tried to seize control of the family heating pad business.

  • January 23, 2024

    Ex-Mich. Judicial Assistant Charged With Stealing From Judge

    A former Michigan state judicial assistant has been accused of embezzling more than $60,000 from the Detroit-area judge he worked for by using an ATM card that belonged to the jurist, prosecutors said Tuesday.

  • January 23, 2024

    Mich. Justices Won't Hear Hospital Stroke Treatment Suit

    The Michigan Supreme Court has declined to grant a hearing in an appeal challenging the dismissal of vicarious liability claims against a hospital over a patient whose stroke was allegedly not treated fast enough.

  • January 22, 2024

    High Court Won't Pause Order Scrapping Detroit Voting Map

    Michigan's redistricting commission must press on with completing new legislative maps by a court-imposed Feb. 2 deadline, after the U.S. Supreme Court refused Monday to suspend the ruling barring elections with the current maps.

  • January 22, 2024

    Flint Water Jury Can See Child Blood Toxicity Data

    A Michigan federal judge said on Monday that Flint residents can show a jury data about young children's blood toxicity levels during the city's water crisis, even though the children are not part of the class in an upcoming trial accusing an engineering firm of prolonging residents' lead exposure.

  • January 22, 2024

    JPMorgan Unit Says Ex-Adviser Stole Clients Worth $40M

    JPMorgan's investment management arm has urged a Michigan federal court to issue an injunction against a former wealth adviser who oversaw roughly half a billion dollars in client funds, alleging the ex-employee has been "bad-mouthing" the company and poached clients with $40 million in combined assets for his own business.

  • January 22, 2024

    Mich. Justice Warns Of 'Endless' Appeals After Panel Flip-Flop

    Two Michigan Supreme Court justices decried their colleagues' decision Friday not to take up a reinstated $20 million verdict against a hospital, writing that the court was now leaving in place an "unworkable rule" that would allow intermediate appellate panels to overrule one another. 

  • January 22, 2024

    Health Groups Must Face Suit Over Spine Drain Injury

    A Michigan appeals panel has revived a suit against a hospital and medical group over a piece of drainage tube left in a patient, saying there's evidence suggesting the nurse practitioner in charge of his care should have realized the drain was damaged when it was removed.

  • January 19, 2024

    Law360 Names Firms Of The Year

    Eight law firms have earned spots as Law360's Firms of the Year, with 55 Practice Group of the Year awards among them, steering some of the largest deals of 2023 and securing high-profile litigation wins, including at the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • January 19, 2024

    Law360 Names Practice Groups Of The Year

    Law360 would like to congratulate the winners of its Practice Groups of the Year awards for 2023, which honor the attorney teams behind litigation wins and major deals that resonated throughout the legal industry this past year.

  • January 19, 2024

    Mich. Judge Ends Class Action Bid In Takings Case

    A Michigan federal judge on Friday ended a group of former homeowners' bid to receive class certification and litigate claims against a county government they accused of an unlawful taking when their properties were foreclosed on and sold, ruling that they would need to seek relief individually. 

Expert Analysis

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • The Issues Brewing Around Starbucks Labor Practice Cases

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    Starbucks is faced with fighting off another push for a nationwide injunction against firing any employees that support unionization, and there's a distinct possibility that the company and the National Labor Relations Board could be fighting the same fight over and over in various locations, says Janette Levey at Levey Law.

  • Assessing EPA's Potential Retreat On Title VI Enforcement

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    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's decision to close its Title VI investigation of Louisiana — rather than respond to the state's litigation challenge against it — raises questions about the efficacy of the agency's plans to use Title VI in support of its environmental justice initiatives, say Susan Richardson and Jeffrey Davidson at Kilpatrick Townsend.

  • Immigration Program Pitfalls Exacerbate Physician Shortages

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    Eliminating shortcomings from U.S. immigration regulations and policies could help mitigate the national shortage of physicians by encouraging foreign physicians to work in medically underserved areas, but progress has been halted by partisan gridlock, say Alison Hitz and Dana Schwarz at Clark Hill.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • FLSA Collective Actions: Are Courts Still Dancing The 2-Step?

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    In the absence of amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act, courts have filled in some of the statute's gaps and established a two-step framework for conditional certification of a class, but recent rulings show signs that courts are ready to hold party plaintiffs to a higher standard if they want to recruit others to join their lawsuits, says Allison Powers at Barack Ferrazzano.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

  • The Legal Issues Flying Around The Evolving Drone Market

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    As the number of drone registrations is expected to more than double over the next three years, the industry faces new risks and considerations related to privacy, Fourth Amendment, criminal, evidentiary, First Amendment, and insurance litigation, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Opinion

    Supreme Court Must End Acquitted Conduct Sentencing

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    While all three branches of government have shown reluctance to address the issue of acquitted conduct sentencing, including the U.S. Supreme Court in its recent denial of certiorari in a case addressing the topic, the court must — as only it can — put an end to this unconstitutional practice, say Alan Ellis at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis and Mark Allenbaugh at Sentencing Stats.

  • Challenging Standing In Antitrust Class Actions: Timing

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    The early resolution of Article III standing disputes in antitrust class actions can result in sizable efficiencies, but some litigants and courts are improperly relying on the Amchem and Ortiz U.S. Supreme Court cases to defer standing issues until after ruling on plaintiffs' class certification motions, say Michael Hamburger and Holly Tao at White & Case.

  • Level Up Lawyers' Business Development With Gamification

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    With employee engagement at a 10-year low in the U.S., there are several gamification techniques marketing and business development teams at law firms can use to make generating new clients and matters more appealing to lawyers, says Heather McCullough at Society 54.

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