Michigan

  • January 17, 2024

    Ford Settles Claims Over Defective Water Pumps

    Ford Motor Co. has settled class claims alleging the auto company sold vehicles with defective water pumps, according to an order dismissing the case with prejudice.

  • January 17, 2024

    State AGs Say AI-Generated Voices Fall Under Robocall Law

    Half the states in the union have banded together to tell the Federal Communications Commission they believe making unsolicited marketing calls using voices created with artificial intelligence violates federal telemarketing law.

  • January 17, 2024

    Feds Claim Forex Trader Was Running $100M Ponzi Scheme

    Federal prosecutors have said a Michigan grand jury has indicted the fugitive operator of a supposed foreign exchange trading firm with duping investors through a Ponzi-like scheme that raked in $100 million.

  • January 17, 2024

    Engineering Co. Can Point Fingers In Flint Water Trial

    A Michigan federal judge on Tuesday said that a water engineering firm accused of negligence that prolonged the Flint water crisis can argue to a jury that other individuals and groups had some fault in the water contamination.

  • January 17, 2024

    Detroit Voters Want Map Master Axed Over Atty Ties

    Residents who successfully challenged Detroit's voting maps want to veto a special master tapped to assess the state redistricting commission's retooled maps, saying his "deep professional and philosophical ties" to a commission attorney and Voting Rights Act expert will skew his analysis.

  • January 17, 2024

    High Court Majority Shows No Eagerness To Overturn Chevron

    U.S. Supreme Court justices on Wednesday appeared split about whether decades-old precedent that favors federal agencies' legal interpretations in rulemaking infringes on judges' rightful authority to decide questions of law.

  • January 16, 2024

    6 Opinions To Read Before High Court's Chevron Arguments

    The U.S. Supreme Court will consider Wednesday whether to overturn a decades-old doctrine that instructs courts to defer to federal agencies' interpretations of ambiguous statutes, arguments in which nearly two dozen of the justices' prior writings may be used to persuade them to toss the controversial court precedent.

  • January 16, 2024

    Embattled Burger Chain Not Paying Property Taxes, Suit Says

    A beleaguered burger chain grappling with frozen assets stemming from healthcare fraud charges against a businessman is now facing a civil suit by a landlord claiming it hasn't paid property taxes on or properly maintained a few locations in Michigan. 

  • January 16, 2024

    Windshield Repair Co. Can Fight Safelite's 'Dollar-Bill Rule'

    A Sixth Circuit panel breathed new life into a windshield repair entrepreneur's battle with Safelite on Tuesday, resurrecting the inventor's claim that Safelite drove away his customers by spreading the message that long cracks weren't safe to repair.

  • January 16, 2024

    Walmart's 'Fingerprints' On Fatal Shooting, 6th Circ. Hears

    The family of a young man killed by police while he was carrying an unpackaged BB gun at Walmart urged the Sixth Circuit to revive its wrongful death claim, arguing that Ohio state court case law supports their position that the retailer should be held liable for failing to secure the gun.

  • January 16, 2024

    Mich. Judge Pushes For Deal In IT Co.'s Worker-Poaching Suit

    A Michigan federal judge has paused an IT help-desk company's suit alleging a competitor poached employees and stole trade secrets, saying a recent hearing made it clear the best path forward would be to attempt to reach a settlement.

  • January 16, 2024

    Produce Co. Asks Why Bankruptcy Doesn't Bar $1.3M Suit

    The U.S. arm of a Canadian vegetable wholesaler has asked a Michigan federal judge to explain his ruling that the business must face a lawsuit from three distributors over its objections that a bankruptcy proceeding in Canada should block their U.S. complaint.

  • January 16, 2024

    Georgia-Pacific Won't Give Up Michigan Superfund Cost Fight

    Following losses at the Sixth Circuit and U.S. Supreme Court, Georgia-Pacific on Friday asked a Michigan federal judge to preserve its right to sue International Paper Co. and Weyerhaeuser Co. for future cleanup costs of a Michigan Superfund site.

  • January 12, 2024

    Justices Asked To Keep Tossed Mich. Voting Maps For Now

    Michigan's redistricting commission asked the U.S. Supreme Court this week to pause a racial gerrymandering ruling that has left the group scrambling to redraw Detroit's legislative districts in time for this year's elections.

  • January 12, 2024

    Mich. Township Blocked 'Green' Burial Forest, Couple Says

    A Michigan couple says Brooks Township enacted an unconstitutional ban on opening cemeteries in efforts to block their plans for a "green" burial site on their forested property.

  • January 12, 2024

    NLRB Wants Starbucks To Rehire Fired Union Supporters

    A regional director of the National Labor Relations Board called on a Michigan federal judge Friday to order the immediate rehiring of two fired Starbucks workers, arguing there was cause to believe that the firings were retaliatory and would chill workers' willingness to organize.

  • January 12, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Chevron Deference, Corp. Filings

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Martin Luther King Jr. Day and will begin a short oral argument week Tuesday, during which the justices will consider overturning Chevron deference, a decades-old doctrine that instructs courts to defer to federal agencies' interpretations of ambiguous statutes. 

  • January 12, 2024

    Subscriber Class Attys Get $3.25M In Data-Sharing Settlement

    Attorneys for a class of magazine subscribers who settled an action alleging publishers shared personal information without consent will get $3.25 million in fees, a Michigan federal judge has ruled in giving the final approval to the $9.5 million agreement.

  • January 12, 2024

    High Court Eyes Chevron Deference: What You Need To Know

    Will the U.S. Supreme Court overturn 40 years of doctrine telling courts to defer to federal agencies when interpreting laws? That's what is at stake Wednesday when the justices hear two cases, both from fishing companies that have asked the court to turn its back or limit the impact of the 1984 decision in Chevron v. Natural Resources Defense Council. Here, catch up with Law360's coverage of the cases brought by Loper Bright Enterprises and Relentless Inc.

  • January 12, 2024

    Mich. Panel Revives Trucker's Fire Damage Coverage Dispute

    A Michigan state appeals court has revived a truck driver's lawsuit over the loss of nearly $1 million in personal property during a fire, saying he was not the "operator" of a parked vehicle that he alleges started the blaze for purposes of the state's property protection insurance benefits statute.

  • January 12, 2024

    Justices To Decide Federal Rights Exhaustion Rule

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to resolve lingering questions over the breadth of its previous rulings prohibiting states from requiring litigants to exhaust state administrative remedies before pursuing federal right violation claims, in a dispute over Alabama's processing of unemployment benefits claims.

  • January 12, 2024

    No-Fault Crash Suit Doesn't Bar Negligence Claim, Panel Says

    The estate of a man who was injured in a vehicle crash involving a Detroit city bus can sue the city and driver for negligence, a Michigan appeals court ruled, saying the claims did not have to be joined to an earlier no-fault suit stemming from the same crash.

  • January 12, 2024

    Justices Take Up Starbucks' NLRB Injunction Challenge

    The U.S. Supreme Court is poised to standardize the circuit courts' approach to vetting National Labor Relations Board injunction bids after accepting on Jan. 12 Starbucks' challenge to a Sixth Circuit ruling upholding an order to rehire seven fired workers.

  • January 12, 2024

    Off The Bench: NFL Grilled On Gruden, NIL Rules, LSU Victory

    In this week's Off The Bench, the NFL defended its arbitration clauses to skeptical Nevada justices in its case with former coach Jon Gruden, the NCAA approved more NIL guidelines while dinging Florida State University for a related infraction, and a retaliation suit against Louisiana State University over alleged sexual harassment was tossed.

  • January 11, 2024

    Mich. Justices Wary Of Finding COVID Orders Overstepped

    Michigan Supreme Court justices gave an icy reception Thursday to arguments that their own orders pushing back litigants' case initiation deadlines during the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic were unconstitutional.

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Legal Issues Grant-Funded Broadband Projects May Face

    Author Photo

    The Biden administration's recently announced funding allocations represent the largest ever government investment in broadband internet infrastructure, but these new development opportunities will require navigation of complicated and sometimes arcane legal environments, says Casey Lide at Keller & Heckman.

  • 5 Ways Firms Can Rethink Office Design In A Hybrid World

    Author Photo

    As workplaces across the country adapt to flexible work, law firms must prioritize individuality, amenities and technology in office design, says Kristin Cerutti at Nelson Worldwide.

  • False Ad Snapshot Shows Risks Of Geographic Origin Claims

    Author Photo

    A look at recent and historical cases involving deceptive use of geographic origin descriptors show that companies proclaiming they are American, but that sell products originating from outside the U.S., could be at risk under unfair competition laws or Federal Trade Commission enforcement, say attorneys at Carlson Gaskey.

  • Opinion

    Bar Score Is Best Hiring Metric Post-Affirmative Action

    Author Photo

    After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies, law firms looking to foster diversity in hiring should view an applicant's Multistate Bar Examination score as the best metric of legal ability — over law school name or GPA, says attorney Alice Griffin.

  • Ghosting In BigLaw: How To Come Back From Lack Of Feedback

    Author Photo

    Junior associates can feel powerless when senior colleagues cut off contact instead of providing useful feedback, but young attorneys can get back on track by focusing on practical professional development and reexamining their career priorities, says Rachel Patterson at Orrick.

  • Would Biden Airline Service Order Raise 'Major Questions'?

    Author Photo

    President Joe Biden's recent pledge to require airlines to compensate passengers for delays and cancellations could run afoul of the U.S. Supreme Court's recently expounded "major questions" doctrine — but that will depend on what kind of action the administration takes, and how federal courts choose to apply the doctrine, says Roger Clark at Signature Resolution.

  • Opinion

    States Must Fight Predatory Real Estate Listing Agreements

    Author Photo

    As momentum against long-term real estate listing agreements continues to grow, states should take action to render existing agreements unenforceable and discourage future unfair and deceptive trade practices in real estate, says Elizabeth Blosser at the American Land Title Association.

  • Steps To Success For Senior Associates

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Adriana Paris at Rissman Barrett discusses the increased responsibilities and opportunities that becoming a senior associate brings and what attorneys in this role should prioritize to flourish in this stressful but rewarding next level in their careers.

  • What 6th Circ. Ruling May Portend For PFAS Coverage Cases

    Author Photo

    The Sixth Circuit's recent decision in Admiral Insurance v. Fire-Dex, rejecting the insurer's attempt to avoid coverage, shows that federal courts may decline to resolve novel PFAS state-law issues, and that insurers may have less confidence than originally intimated in the applicability of the pollution exclusion to PFAS claims, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • How To Avoid A Zombie Office Building Apocalypse

    Author Photo

    With national office vacancy rates approaching 20%, policymakers, investors and developers will need to come together in order to prevent this troubling trend from sucking the life out of business districts or contaminating the broader real estate market, say Ryan Sommers and Robyn Minter Smyers at Thompson Hine.

  • Legal Profession Must Do More For Lawyers With Disabilities

    Author Photo

    At the start of Disability Pride month, Rosalyn Richter at Arnold & Porter looks at why lawyers with disabilities are significantly underrepresented in private practice, asserting that law firms and other employers must do more to conquer the implicit bias that deters attorneys from seeking accommodations.

  • NBA Players Must Avoid Legal Fouls In CBD Deals

    Author Photo

    The NBA’s recently ratified collective bargaining agreement allows athletes to promote CBD brands and products, but athletes and the companies they promote must be cautious of a complex patchwork of applicable state laws and federal regulators’ approach to advertising claims, says Airina Rodrigues at Brownstein Hyatt.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Exposing Their Firms To Cyberattacks

    Author Photo

    Attorneys are the weakest link in their firms' cyberdefenses because hackers often exploit the gap between individuals’ work and personal cybersecurity habits, but there are some steps lawyers can take to reduce the risks they create for their employers, say Mark Hurley and Carmine Cicalese at Digital Privacy & Protection.

  • Virginia 'Rocket Docket' Slowdown Is Likely A Blip

    Author Photo

    After being the fastest or second-fastest federal civil trial court for 14 straight years, the Eastern District of Virginia has slid to 18th place, but the rocket docket’s statistical tumble doesn't mean the district no longer maintains a speedy civil docket, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • A Look At 2023's Major NLRB Developments Thus Far

    Author Photo

    Over the last six months, the National Labor Relations Board has broadened its interpretation and enforcement of the National Labor Relations Act, including increasing penalties and efforts to prohibit restrictive covenants and confidentiality agreements, say Eve Klein and Elizabeth Mincer at Duane Morris.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Michigan archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!