New Jersey

  • February 09, 2024

    No More Shady Trading For Ex-FBI Trainee After BigLaw Theft

    The former FBI trainee who secretly traded nonpublic information that he stole from his BigLaw associate ex-girlfriend has agreed to a civil judgment against him permanently barring him from violating securities laws, a judgment entered just months after he pled guilty to insider trading.

  • February 09, 2024

    Lawmakers Want TikTok Parent Barred From Software Exports

    A group of lawmakers led by Republican Rep. Dan Crenshaw and Democrat Rep. Josh Gottheimer have asked the Biden administration to add TikTok's parent company, ByteDance, to the U.S. Department of Commerce's foreign entity list and bar the transfer of U.S. software to the company.

  • February 09, 2024

    Minor League Baseball Team Sues 'Traitor' For Costly Betrayal

    The Jackson Generals baseball organization has sued a member of Minor League Baseball's board of trustees for the alleged "treason" of supporting Major League Baseball's formation of a new organization that resulted in 43 teams becoming disenfranchised and losing tens of millions of dollars in branding opportunities.

  • February 09, 2024

    Wakefern Food Can't Avoid Suit Over Graham Crackers' Label

    Supermarket chain Wakefern Food Corp. must continue to face claims in a putative class action brought by consumers claiming it falsely advertised its graham crackers as whole grain, a New York federal judge has ruled.

  • February 09, 2024

    Bloomberg Inks $8.6M Deal In OT Fight With Data Analysts

    A trio of ex-Bloomberg data analysts said Thursday that the media company has agreed to pay $8.6 million to end class and collective action allegations in New Jersey federal court accusing the data and media company of failing to pay them for overtime work.

  • February 09, 2024

    Biden Admin. Seeks Suppliers For Major Clean Energy Deals

    The Biden administration is looking for contractors to provide clean electricity to civilian and defense agencies in the mid-Atlantic and Midwest states for what it says will be one of the federal government's "largest-ever clean electricity purchases."

  • February 09, 2024

    3rd Circ. Won't Revive Fired Officer's Infertility Leave Bias Suit

    The Third Circuit on Friday backed the dismissal of a juvenile probation officer's suit claiming she was fired for requesting time off to recover from an infertility-related procedure, ruling that she hadn't put forward enough proof to disqualify the state's assertion she was fired for sloppy case filings.

  • February 09, 2024

    NJ Won't Restrict Ch. 11 Cases To Certain Judges, Group Told

    A creditors advocacy group concerned about "judge-shopping" in major bankruptcy cases has said the chief judge of New Jersey's increasingly popular bankruptcy court has assured the group he will not limit such cases to particular jurists.

  • February 09, 2024

    FCRA Immunity Waiver Ruling Tees Up Compliance Frenzy

    A U.S. Supreme Court ruling that the Fair Credit Reporting Act waives federal agencies' immunity from lawsuits will not only open the door to more litigation against government lenders but may also trigger housecleaning to ensure that debts are correctly reported, experts told Law360.

  • February 09, 2024

    2023 Patent Litigation: A Year In Review

    Attorneys filed fewer patent suits in district courts in 2023 than in any year for more than a decade, and the amount of America Invents Act petitions at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board fell to a 10-year low as well. The Western District of Texas also lost its place as the most popular patent litigation venue in the U.S. in 2023, with the Eastern District of Texas overtaking it.

  • February 09, 2024

    'Not Walmart': Ex-McElroy Deutsch CFO Must Face Theft Suit

    A New Jersey state judge on Friday declined to remove McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP's former chief financial officer from a suit accusing him and his wife of stealing more than $3 million, noting that the heightened ethical duty imposed on law firms justifies keeping the claims alive. 

  • February 09, 2024

    NJ Courts Reject Liability In Ex-Judge's Harassment Suit

    The New Jersey Administrative Office of the Courts asked a state court to remove it as a defendant from a municipal court administrator's sexual harassment suit against a former municipal judge, saying the parties were not employees of the AOC.

  • February 09, 2024

    NJ Attorney Gets 3-Month Suspension For Misleading Ads

    A New Jersey-based attorney was hit with a three-month suspension by the Supreme Court of New Jersey's Disciplinary Review Board after it found that he engaged in improper advertising by directly mailing potential clients solicitation letters featuring inaccurate and missing information.

  • February 09, 2024

    What To Know About 'Novel' Johnson & Johnson ERISA Suit

    A new lawsuit from a Johnson & Johnson worker claims the company violated federal law by letting pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts overcharge health plan participants for drugs, potentially signaling that fee litigation under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act is shifting focus from retirement savings to health benefits, attorneys say.

  • February 08, 2024

    IP Forecast: 2nd Circ. To Hear TM Fight Over Whiskey Bottles

    The Second Circuit will consider whether a jury in the Southern District of New York was wrong to decide that the shape of bottles used by the Bulleit bourbon brand is distinctive enough to be protected by trademark law. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • February 08, 2024

    FDA Settles Allegations Of Uneven Blood Treatment Standards

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has settled a pharmaceutical company's lawsuit in D.C. federal court accusing the agency of subjecting the company's blood-clotting medication to costly clinical trials and higher standards than its competitors' products were required to meet.

  • February 08, 2024

    NJ, Ft. Lee Mayor Fail To Merge NY Congestion Pricing Suits

    A federal judge on Thursday rejected a bid to consolidate two lawsuits — one filed by New Jersey, the other by the mayor of a Garden State town — seeking to halt New York City's congestion pricing toll plan, ruling that the suits make similar claims but seek different remedies.

  • February 08, 2024

    Mich. Counties Sue Drug Giants Over Insulin Prices

    Several Michigan counties on Wednesday accused some of the world's largest drugmakers, retailers and pharmacy benefit managers of scheming to inflate insulin prices and costing the municipalities millions of extra dollars in healthcare costs for their employees and retirees.

  • February 08, 2024

    NJ Superior Court Hopefuls Greenlighted By Senate Panel

    The New Jersey Senate's Judiciary Committee on Thursday advanced three nominees for the short-staffed state Superior Court who have served in local government and approved the formal nomination of Essex County's acting prosecutor of six years.

  • February 08, 2024

    Ex-NJ Judge Suspended From Law Practice Over Groping

    The New Jersey Supreme Court handed down a one-year suspension from practicing law to a former North Bergen municipal court judge who was previously permanently barred from being a judge for groping a woman and being dishonest about the incident in the judicial ethics case against him.

  • February 08, 2024

    Ex-Billing Manager Says NJ Firm Put Fees Over Clients

    A former billing manager for the New Jersey personal injury firm Brandon J. Broderick Attorney At Law claims she was fired for insisting that the firm's clients receive the most money possible from their settlements, according to a lawsuit filed in New Jersey state court.

  • February 08, 2024

    Justices Rule Gov't Agencies Not Immune From FCRA Suits

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a person can sue a government agency under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, because the law's 1970 definition of a "person" was sufficient to waive the government's immunity.

  • February 07, 2024

    Hose Co. Says Patent Battle Raises Ethical Questions

    A company that sells flexible, retractable hoses has told the director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office that a rival's latest legal maneuver in their decadelong patent war "presents a substantial threat to the integrity of the patent system."

  • February 07, 2024

    EDTX Eclipses WDTX As Top Patent Venue

    The Eastern District of Texas in 2023 surpassed the state's Western District as the most popular venue for patent litigation nationally, now that patent cases are no longer automatically assigned to a prominent judge in Waco, according to new data from Lex Machina.

  • February 07, 2024

    NJ Court Upholds Cop's $1.5M Verdict In Military Bias Suit

    A New Jersey appellate court rejected a bid by a Jersey shore town and its police department for a new trial on claims that it didn't promote one of its police officers because he was in the military, upholding a $1.5 million verdict and $600,000 in attorney fees in favor of the former officer.

Expert Analysis

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Opinion

    Courts Shouldn't Credit Allegations From Short-Seller Reports

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    Securities class actions against public companies can extend for years and lead to significant settlements, so courts should not allow such cases with allegations wholly reliant on reports by short-sellers, who have an economic interest in seeing a company's stock price decline, to proceed past the motion to dismiss stage, says Richard Zelichov at DLA Piper.

  • Handling Religious Objections To Abortion-Related Job Duties

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    While health care and pharmacy employee religious exemption requests concerning abortion-related procedures or drugs are not new, recent cases demonstrate why employer accommodation considerations should factor in the Title VII standard set forth by the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2023 Groff v. DeJoy ruling, as well as applicable federal, state and local laws, say attorneys at Epstein Becker.

  • California's Offshore Turbine Plans Face Stiff Headwinds

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    To realize its innovative plans for floating offshore wind farms, California will face numerous challenges as companies investing in the industry will be looking for permitting transparency, predictable timelines, and meaningful coordination between jurisdictions, agencies, and stakeholders, say David Smith and David McGrath at Manatt.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Analyzing The Legal Ripples Of The EPA's PFAS Regulation

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    As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency makes major moves on its pledge to regulate per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, the developing body of PFAS regulation will lead to an increase in litigation, and personal injury and product liability claims, say attorneys at Gordon & Rees.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Opinion

    Test Results Signal Poor Odds For Lead Cables Litigation

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    After sites in New York and New Jersey allegedly contaminated with lead by telecommunications cables were found by state and federal agencies to present no imminent threats to public health, it seems unlikely that mass litigation over this issue by plaintiffs firms or state attorneys general will succeed, says Andrew Ketterer at Ketterer & Ketterer.

  • How Justices' Disclosure Ruling May Change Corp. Filings

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    In the upcoming Macquarie Infrastructure v. Moab Partners case, the U.S. Supreme Court will resolve a circuit split over whether a company may be sued for private securities fraud if they fail to disclose certain financial information in public filings, which may change the way management analyzes industry risks and trends for investors, says Paul Kisslinger at Lewis Brisbois.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • 3 Quirks Of New Jersey Insurance Coverage Law

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    There are a multitude of state-specific requirements and nuances that make New Jersey insurance law unique, including in the areas of duty to defend, reservation of rights and bad faith, say attorneys at Goldberg Segalla.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • Series

    In Focus At The EEOC: Advancing Equal Pay

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    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently finalized strategic enforcement plan expresses a renewed commitment to advancing equal pay at a time when employees have unprecedented access to compensation information, highlighting for employers the importance of open communication and ongoing pay equity analyses, say Paul Evans at Baker McKenzie and Christine Hendrickson at Syndio.

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