Ohio

  • January 10, 2024

    OSU, Dentist End Retaliation Suit Amid New Trial Request

    Ohio State University and a former faculty member settled a retaliation suit ahead of a potential new trial for punitive damages that would have followed a $600,000 compensatory award after she convinced a federal jury her job was threatened for participating in an investigation into a senior faculty member's misconduct, according to a Wednesday court filing.

  • January 10, 2024

    Power Cos. Urge DC Circ. To Scrap EPA Coal Ash Rule

    Power companies and an industry group urged the D.C. Circuit Monday to overturn what they call a new prohibition on the closure of coal ash impoundments that contain coal ash in contact with groundwater, saying the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is trying to couch its actions as the application of existing regulations.

  • January 09, 2024

    Ohio Judge Pauses 'Breathtakingly Blunt' Social Media Age Law

    An Ohio federal judge on Tuesday put a temporary hold on a new state law requiring social media platforms and other sites to get parents' consent before opening accounts for children under 16, calling the law "a breathtakingly blunt instrument for reducing social media's harm to children."

  • January 09, 2024

    Trade Secrets Judgment Closed Door On Fee, Ohio Justices Told

    An industrial lighting company on Tuesday urged the Ohio Supreme Court to undo a $1 million attorney fee a competitor won for an earlier appeal in the companies' trade secrets dispute, arguing that the award wasn't permitted after the entry of a final judgment.

  • January 09, 2024

    Ohio Sec. Of State Wants Justice's Election Label Suit Tossed

    Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose urged a federal court this week to reject a state Supreme Court justice's challenge to a state law that would require her to be listed as a Democrat on general election ballots, arguing that since she hasn't yet declared her candidacy for any future office or judicial seat, she has no standing to sue.

  • January 09, 2024

    Ohio High Court Urged To Toss $650M Opioid Verdict

    Walmart, CVS and Walgreens — backed by business groups — have urged the Ohio Supreme Court to toss a $650 million jury verdict awarded to two counties in opioid litigation, saying that state product liability law bars the counties' public nuisance claims.

  • January 09, 2024

    Craft Breweries Stiffed Tipped Workers, Server Says

    The parent company of craft beer brands including Sixpoint Brewery stole servers' tips and required them to spend excess time performing untipped tasks for subminimum pay, an ex-employee alleged in a proposed class and collective action filed in North Carolina federal court.

  • January 09, 2024

    Journalists Back Challenge To Mich. Court Recording Ban

    An attorney fighting a Michigan county court's ban on recording livestreamed proceedings got support from two national journalism organizations Monday, with the groups telling the Sixth Circuit that a lower court didn't analyze whether the restriction was overly broad.

  • January 08, 2024

    Claims Against LA Ad Firm Trimmed In $10M Fraud Row

    An Ohio federal judge trimmed claims of fraudulent misrepresentation and conversion against a Los Angeles-based advertising firm and its chief executive officer, leaving intact seven other counts in an insurer's $10 million racketeering fraud suit against an ex-executive and, the suit says, his co-conspirators.

  • January 08, 2024

    6th Circ. Nixes Class Rep Swap In Tax Foreclosure Suit

    A Michigan man seeking compensation for losing the surplus value of his property in a tax foreclosure sale can't be a substitute plaintiff in a class action against a group of county governments, the 6th Circuit said, because he lacks sufficient legal interest in the case.

  • January 08, 2024

    Commerce Readies Controversial Triple-Digit Tin Mill Duties

    The U.S. Department of Commerce has released its final calculations for prospective duties on tin mill products from eight countries, with one Chinese producer's rate nearing 650% in a probe that has divided lawmakers and spurred opposition from industry.

  • January 08, 2024

    Feds Pitch $7.2M Deal With Chevron, Others Over Ohio Site

    Chevron USA Inc. and four other companies have agreed to pay more than $7.2 million to resolve claims that they polluted two waterways that flow into Lake Erie's Maumee Bay near Toledo, Ohio, the U.S. Department of Justice said Monday.

  • January 08, 2024

    HP Accused Of Using Software To Create Printer-Ink Monopoly

    A group of consumers has hit HP Inc. with a proposed antitrust class action in Illinois federal court, alleging the printer maker has a monopoly over the replacement-ink cartridge market and used software updates to block consumers from using cheaper rival cartridges in HP printers.

  • January 08, 2024

    Jury 'Confused' In Shampoo Contract Case, Conn. Judge Told

    A shampoo fragrances supplier urged a Connecticut state judge to overturn a trial verdict in favor of a botanical scent producer in a contract dispute, arguing Monday that the jury's likely bafflement over the agreement's terms should invalidate its finding.

  • January 08, 2024

    Equifax Accused Of Falsely Reporting Forgiven Student Debt

    Atlanta-based Equifax recklessly published derogatory and damaging credit reports that falsely included a woman's six-figure student loan debt forgiven by the Biden administration more than a year earlier, according to a proposed class action filed in Georgia federal court.

  • January 08, 2024

    Dollar Bank Customer Drops Data Breach Class Action

    A Pennsylvania woman who said Dollar Bank "opened the door" for the cybercriminals who hacked into its systems and got access to her and other customers' personal information by not following industry standards for data security has voluntarily dismissed her proposed class action.

  • January 08, 2024

    Justices Pass On Ohio Train-Crossing Law Dispute

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to consider Ohio's bid to enforce a state law that penalizes railroads if their trains block grade crossings for more than five minutes, turning away a case that sought further clarity on the scope of federal preemption concerning rail regulations.

  • January 08, 2024

    Justices Won't Take Up Mistrial After Judge's COVID Exposure

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review a Michigan federal judge's declaration of a mistrial in a tax case after the judge was exposed to COVID-19 when his wife tested positive for the virus.

  • January 05, 2024

    Tech Group Sues To Block Ohio Social Media Age-Check Law

    A trade association whose members include Meta Platforms and TikTok is challenging a new Ohio law requiring social media platforms and other sites to get parents' consent before opening accounts for minors under 16, saying in a federal lawsuit Friday the state can't regulate minors' access to protected speech online.

  • January 05, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Cannabis Co. Can't Block Rival's Shop

    Cannabis company Local Roots can't upend a settlement a Michigan city made with a rival enterprise that allows for more than one dispensary to set up shop in the town, the Sixth Circuit ruled, saying Local Roots missed its chance to intervene in their litigation.

  • January 05, 2024

    Ohio Governor Bans Transgender Surgery For Minors

    Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine issued an executive order Friday banning Ohio hospitals and other medical facilities from providing gender transition surgeries for any minor under the age of 18 and further proposed two rules to address transgender health for those seeking care.

  • January 05, 2024

    Ky. Wants Justices To Undo Threat To State Healthcare Regs

    Kentucky is asking the nation's highest court to reverse a Sixth Circuit decision that suggests states can't use their four-decade-old "certificate of need" policies to regulate new entrants into a state's healthcare market.

  • January 05, 2024

    Biggest Personal Injury And Med Mal Court Decisions In 2023

    A U.S. Supreme Court ruling addressing states' jurisdiction over out-of-state companies and a key ruling in sprawling multidistrict litigation against Silicon Valley's biggest companies over social media addiction are among Law360's top personal injury and medical malpractice cases for 2023.

  • January 05, 2024

    Legal Insurance Co. Omits OT For Preshift Tasks, Court Told

    A legal insurance provider has not been paying its customer service workers for the time they spend booting up computers and software programs before their workday begins, a former customer service representative claimed in a proposed collective action in Ohio federal court.

  • January 04, 2024

    Cleaning Co. Seeks Coverage For Wrongful Termination Suit

    A kitchen exhaust system cleaning company is seeking over $250,000 in damages from two Hartford units and an insurance agency, telling an Ohio federal court that the insurers wrongfully denied coverage for an underlying judgment entered against it in a wrongful termination lawsuit.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Immigration Program Pitfalls Exacerbate Physician Shortages

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    Eliminating shortcomings from U.S. immigration regulations and policies could help mitigate the national shortage of physicians by encouraging foreign physicians to work in medically underserved areas, but progress has been halted by partisan gridlock, say Alison Hitz and Dana Schwarz at Clark Hill.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • FLSA Collective Actions: Are Courts Still Dancing The 2-Step?

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    In the absence of amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act, courts have filled in some of the statute's gaps and established a two-step framework for conditional certification of a class, but recent rulings show signs that courts are ready to hold party plaintiffs to a higher standard if they want to recruit others to join their lawsuits, says Allison Powers at Barack Ferrazzano.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

  • The Legal Issues Flying Around The Evolving Drone Market

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    As the number of drone registrations is expected to more than double over the next three years, the industry faces new risks and considerations related to privacy, Fourth Amendment, criminal, evidentiary, First Amendment, and insurance litigation, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Employer Drug-Testing Policies Must Evolve With State Law

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    As multistate employers face ongoing challenges in drafting consistent marijuana testing policies due to the evolving patchwork of state laws, they should note some emerging patterns among local and state statutes to ensure compliance in different jurisdictions, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Challenging Standing In Antitrust Class Actions: Timing

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    The early resolution of Article III standing disputes in antitrust class actions can result in sizable efficiencies, but some litigants and courts are improperly relying on the Amchem and Ortiz U.S. Supreme Court cases to defer standing issues until after ruling on plaintiffs' class certification motions, say Michael Hamburger and Holly Tao at White & Case.

  • Level Up Lawyers' Business Development With Gamification

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    With employee engagement at a 10-year low in the U.S., there are several gamification techniques marketing and business development teams at law firms can use to make generating new clients and matters more appealing to lawyers, says Heather McCullough at Society 54.

  • Mallory Ruling Leaves Personal Jurisdiction Deeply Unsettled

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    In Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway, a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court recently rolled back key aspects of its 2017 opinion in Daimler AG v. Bauman that limited personal jurisdiction, leaving as many questions for businesses as it answers, say John Cerreta and James Rotondo at Day Pitney.

  • 5 Ways Firms Can Rethink Office Design In A Hybrid World

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    As workplaces across the country adapt to flexible work, law firms must prioritize individuality, amenities and technology in office design, says Kristin Cerutti at Nelson Worldwide.

  • C-PACE Laws Offer Boost For Sustainable Development

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    As more emphasis is placed on energy-efficient infrastructure and sustainability projects, state laws establishing property assessed clean energy financing — known as C-PACE in the commercial context — have become increasingly relevant to project developers' capital stacks, say attorneys at Frost Brown.

  • Opinion

    Bar Score Is Best Hiring Metric Post-Affirmative Action

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    After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies, law firms looking to foster diversity in hiring should view an applicant's Multistate Bar Examination score as the best metric of legal ability — over law school name or GPA, says attorney Alice Griffin.

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