Pennsylvania

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices Squabble Over Emergency Review Of EPA Smog Plan

    The U.S. Supreme Court's liberal wing denounced during oral argument Wednesday their colleagues' decision to consider the merits of four related emergency requests to prevent the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from implementing a plan to reduce cross-state pollution without first getting lower court input.

  • February 21, 2024

    Talen Energy Strikes $20M Deal To End Unpaid Pensions Suit

    A group of Talen Energy Corp. retirees urged a Pennsylvania federal judge Wednesday to give the initial green light to a $20 million deal that would shutter their suit alleging the company withheld early retirement benefits from workers following a company spinoff.

  • February 21, 2024

    Pa. Justices Clarify Timing For Oil & Gas Accounting Claims

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Wednesday said the statute of limitations for filing accounting claims related to oil and gas royalties is six years, definitively putting a time limit on such claims in a way that had not previously been spelled out.

  • February 21, 2024

    Pa. High Court Returns Insurer's Status Question To 3rd Circ.

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court reversed its decision to consider whether a state-created insurer of last resort is a public or private entity, sending the case back to the Third Circuit on Wednesday after determining that the question was a matter of federal law.

  • February 21, 2024

    Irish Pub Chain's Ex-CFO Gets 1.5 Years For $1M Tax Fraud

    The former chief financial officer of a pub chain with more than a dozen Irish-themed restaurants was sentenced to one and a half years in prison Wednesday by an Ohio federal court for his role in a bookkeeping scheme that defrauded eight states of $1 million in sales taxes.

  • February 21, 2024

    Morgue Manager's Wife Cops To Role In Body Part Sales

    The wife of a Harvard University morgue manager will cop to interstate transport of stolen goods for her role in the alleged scheme to steal and sell human remains to a nationwide network, prosecutors said Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    Drexel U Dodges Expanded 'Intentional Interference' Claims

    The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania ruled Wednesday that at-will employees can sue for intentional interference with their employment relationships under state law, but said a former Drexel University accountant who had brought the case before them fell short of showing her supervisor was acting as a third party under the new tort.

  • February 21, 2024

    Rite Aid Gets OK To End Former Queens Store Lease

    Rite Aid Corp. was given permission Wednesday to reject a lease and sublease for a former store in Queens, New York, after a New Jersey bankruptcy judge found that doing so would benefit the debtor's estate.

  • February 21, 2024

    3rd Circ. Kicks Data Privacy Suit Against Penn To State Court

    A proposed class action alleging that the University of Pennsylvania violated the state's privacy law must head back to state court, the Third Circuit ruled Wednesday, rejecting arguments that the university health system acted as a federal officer by operating an online patient portal.

  • February 21, 2024

    Ex-Bank CEO Ends Holland & Knight Overbilling Suit

    Republic First Bancorp's former CEO Vernon Hill II ended his lawsuit accusing Holland & Knight LLP of overcharging him with a $7 million bill for what he claimed was "ineffective and unsatisfactory" representation in legal matters over his ouster from the bank.

  • February 21, 2024

    3rd Circ. Lets J&J Appeal Class Cert. In Talc Concealment Suit

    Johnson & Johnson can appeal a New Jersey federal court's class certification order from December, the Third Circuit ruled Wednesday, in an investor action alleging the company artificially inflated its stock price by failing to disclose cancer risks associated with its talcum powder products.

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices Back Choice-Of-Law In Marine Insurance Suit

    An insurer can enforce choice-of-law provisions in a marine insurance policy it issued to the owner of a yacht that ran aground, the U.S. Supreme Court said Wednesday in a decision upholding long-standing maritime law principles of uniformity and certainty.

  • February 20, 2024

    NFL Seeks Exit To Fan's Suit Over Philly QB's Touchdown Ball

    A lifelong Philadelphia Eagles football fan who says police and security officers battered him after quarterback Jalen Hurts handed him a ball that was used to score a record-breaking touchdown against the New York Giants erred in including the National Football League in his lawsuit, the league argued in a bid to toss the suit.

  • February 20, 2024

    Cool-Cheese Pizzeria Got Cold Feet Over $2.1M Sale, Suit Says

    A Pittsburgh pizzeria known for its unusual practice of putting cold cheese on its pies backed out of a $2.1 million sale just before a potential buyer came to visit, according to a lawsuit a real estate agent filed in Pennsylvania state court.

  • February 20, 2024

    Cozen O'Connor Hires Ex-Eckert Seamans Public Finance Atty

    Philadelphia-based Cozen O'Connor said Tuesday it has hired a former finance attorney from Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC for its public and project finance practice.

  • February 20, 2024

    Pennsylvania Ballots Need Correct Dates, 3rd Circ. Told

    Republican organizations seeking to enforce a Pennsylvania requirement that mail-in ballots have a date and signature on their outer envelope urged the Third Circuit on Tuesday to rule that a district court judge who found more than 10,000 undated or misdated ballots to be valid too broadly applied the materiality provision of the Civil Rights Act.

  • February 20, 2024

    Pa. Contractor Says Ohio Cosmetic Centers Skipped $2M Bill

    A construction contractor took the owner of several medical spa and cosmetic surgery practices to Pennsylvania state court on Friday after the healthcare firm allegedly halted projects in two Ohio suburbs and then failed to pay $2 million that the builder was owed for its work on them.

  • February 17, 2024

    Suspended Pa. Judge Charged With Shooting Ex-Boyfriend

    A Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, magisterial judge already suspended for alleged ethics violations has been charged with attempted murder and aggravated assault for allegedly shooting her ex-boyfriend in the head while he slept, police and prosecutors said.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Revives Comcast Patent Case, And Warns Its Atty

    The Federal Circuit on Friday revived a patent suit against Comcast over voice recognition technology, finding that a lower court misinterpreted the patents, and reprimanded a Comcast attorney from Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP for exceeding word counts in a brief in a related case.

  • February 16, 2024

    The Congressman Who Reps Cannabis Reform On Capitol Hill

    Rep. Earl Blumenauer speaks to Law360 about the prospects for Congress enacting marijuana reform, why he supports moving cannabis to Schedule III and some of the drug policy triumphs and setbacks in his home state of Oregon.

  • February 16, 2024

    PNC Bank Defeats Customer's Suit Over Fraudulent Transfer

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Friday tossed the two remaining claims in a suit alleging PNC Bank NA misled a California-based customer about stopping a money transfer to a scammer, saying the bank did not breach the account-holder agreement when it tried to recover the customer's funds.

  • February 16, 2024

    Uber Tells Court To Disregard Pa. AG's Brief In Wage Suit

    Uber urged a Pennsylvania federal court on Friday to disregard the state attorney general's amicus brief filed in a wage case that will decide whether UberBlack limo drivers are employees or independent contractors, saying the attorney general's involvement is superfluous.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Target, Hoverboard Biz Settle Pa. Fire Deaths For $38.5M

    The parents of two deceased girls, Target and a hoverboard maker entered into a $38.5 million settlement Friday resolving a lawsuit in Pennsylvania federal court over a self-balancing scooter that allegedly shorted out while charging and caused a house fire that claimed the sisters' lives.

  • February 16, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    News broke last week that Delaware's Court of Chancery will say goodbye to its current longest-serving jurist, a development that quickly overshadowed a busy week of new merger and board disputes, fee rulings, settlements, and books-and-records demands.

Expert Analysis

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

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    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Directors And Officers Face Unique AI-Related Risks

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    As privacy, intellectual property and discrimination lawsuits focusing on artificial intelligence increase, corporate directors and officers must stay aware of associated risks, including those related to compliance, litigation and cybersecurity, says Jonathan Meer at Wilson Elser.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • The Questions Around Prometheum's SEC-Compliant Strategy

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    While the rest of the crypto industry has been engaged in a long-running battle to escape the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's jurisdiction, a once-obscure startup called Prometheum has instead embraced the SEC's view to become the first crypto special-purpose broker-dealer, but it's unclear whether it can turn its favored status into a workable business, says Keith Blackman at Bracewell.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: A Strong Year For MDLs

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    While the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation granted even fewer MDL petitions last year than in 2022, hitting a 21st-century low, a closer look at the record-setting number of total actions encompassed within current proceedings reveals that MDL practice is still quite robust, says Alan Rothman at Sidley.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • 3 Areas Of Focus In Congressional Crosshairs This Year

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    Companies must prepare for Congress to build on its 2023 oversight priorities this year, continuing its vigorous inquiries into Chinese company-related investments, workplace safety and labor relations issues, and generative artificial intelligence, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

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