Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • February 13, 2024

    'Rust' Armorer's Phone Snafu Shows Risks Of Texting Clients

    A legal dust-up over compromised text messages between a movie prop weapons expert and her lawyer in the "Rust" film shooting case raises questions about whether attorneys should text with clients and serves as a cautionary tale for prosecutors and the defense on the importance of protecting privileged communications, experts say.

  • February 13, 2024

    Insurer Wants Security Cos. To Repay Assault Defense

    An insurer said it does not owe coverage to two security service companies facing several lawsuits filed by grocery store customers who claim they were battered by security guards, telling a California federal court that the companies owe it reimbursement because their policies don't cover bodily injuries.

  • February 13, 2024

    Colo. Justice Says Something 'Wrong' With Ski Lift Waivers

    A Colorado Supreme Court justice appeared unsettled on Monday by a ski resort's argument that it could free itself from most liability by requiring guests to sign waivers before riding a ski lift, saying the industry seems to be subverting the will of state lawmakers.

  • February 13, 2024

    LSD Trip Didn't Cause Quadriplegia, Houston Jury Told

    An attorney for a former high school gymnast who became a quadriplegic after allegedly taking LSD compared the circumstances of the man's injuries to the hypothetical of a juror getting hit by a car on the way to the courthouse as he fought off a bid from an insurance company seeking to avoid paying a $1 million settlement connected to the man's injury.

  • February 13, 2024

    NY Court Refuses To Toss E. Coli Suit Against Salad Chain

    A New York appellate panel on Tuesday refused to toss a suit seeking to hold Chopt Creative Salad Co. LLC liable for a woman's E. coli food poisoning, allegedly due to eating contaminated spinach in a sandwich, saying that she had shown sufficient testimony and tests to go to trial.

  • February 13, 2024

    Convicted NC Doctor Can't Get Recordings From Prosecutors

    A North Carolina federal judge on Tuesday rejected a doctor's attempt to force prosecutors to turn over recorded phone calls with a telemedicine provider, finding that the requested materials weren't relevant and that she was trying to "manufacture" a way to have her fraud conviction overturned.

  • February 13, 2024

    J&J Hid Cancer Risk From Consumers, Fla. Jury Told

    Johnson & Johnson has known for decades that its baby powder contains asbestos and is linked to cancer, a Miami jury was told Tuesday in a suit seeking to hold the company liable for the death of an anesthesiologist who used the talcum powder daily for 50 years.

  • February 13, 2024

    Mass. Attys Welcome New Guardrails On Trial Time Limits

    Massachusetts attorneys largely welcomed a recent decision by the state's high court blessing time limits in certain situations in civil trials, citing the ruling's helpful guidance and limitations that will likely make ticking clocks less common in state courts than their federal counterparts.

  • February 13, 2024

    Cuomo Says Law Firms Won't Comply With Subpoenas

    Former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to force law firms Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP and Vladeck Raskin & Clark PC to turn over information about the women whose sexual misconduct accusations forced him to resign, even as those women accuse Cuomo of "blatantly" weaponizing his taxpayer-funded attorneys to mount a "revenge" campaign through the courts.

  • February 13, 2024

    BMW Settles Defective Crash System Suit

    BMW reached a settlement Monday ending an Atlanta-area woman's lawsuit claiming its series 328i was defectively designed and caused her to be thrown out of the car during a rollover crash, according to court records.

  • February 13, 2024

    Dallas Venue Not Covered For Shooting Death, Insurer Says

    The property owner of a Dallas event space is not owed defense or indemnity for an underlying wrongful death lawsuit, an insurer told a Texas federal court, arguing that negligent inaction by the property owner triggers two exclusions barring coverage.

  • February 13, 2024

    Ky. Alleges Kroger Had 'Outsized' Role In State's Opioid Crisis

    Kentucky Attorney General Russell Coleman accused the Kroger Co. and two subsidiaries of ignoring red flags and suspicious orders as opioids devastated the state, alleging in a new suit the massive grocery and pharmacy chain violated nuisance and consumer protection laws.

  • February 12, 2024

    EPA Scientist Rips Fluoride IQ Links As 'A Lot Of Uncertainty'

    A U.S. Environmental Protection Agency scientist testifying in a California federal bench trial Monday over fluoride's risks criticized studies showing links between fluoride exposure and IQ drops, saying repeatedly there's "a lot of uncertainty" regarding the studies' data and the "evidence is weak."

  • February 12, 2024

    Trailer Owner Covered Under Driver's Policy, 9th Circ. Affirms

    A Berkshire Hathaway unit must cover a trucking company that was sued over a fatal car accident involving one of its trailers, the Ninth Circuit found Monday, affirming a California federal court's finding and saying the company qualifies as an insured under the policy without exception.

  • February 12, 2024

    7th Circ. Says Plaintiffs' Strategy Doomed Lead Paint Appeal

    The Seventh Circuit has largely rejected a bid to revive toxic tort cases brought by roughly 170 plaintiffs allegedly harmed by lead paint pigment, saying a trial ruling dashing some members' claims applied broadly to almost the entire group.

  • February 12, 2024

    Oil Co. Can't Get New Injury Trial With Video Evidence

    A Texas appeals court declined Friday to let National OilWell Varco LP get a redo in a trial that resulted in a $520,000 injury verdict against it, finding that the trial court was right to exclude video evidence that was disclosed well past the discovery deadline.

  • February 12, 2024

    Pa. Judge Won't Certify Class In Juvenile Facility Abuse Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has declined to certify a proposed class of former residents of juvenile facilities operated by Abraxas Youth and Family Services who claim to have suffered mental, physical or sexual abuse between 2000 and the present, saying "fact-finding mini-trials" would be needed to adequately identify members.

  • February 12, 2024

    Delta Overserved Alcohol To Man Who Killed Wife, Suit Says

    The estate of a woman who died after her intoxicated husband inadvertently hit her with a car is suing Delta Air Lines, claiming the carrier overserved him alcohol on one of its flights, according to a complaint removed to Utah federal court on Friday.

  • February 12, 2024

    State Sen. Says 'Loophole' Still Doesn't Defame Solar Exec

    A Pennsylvania state senator's memorandum over a proposal to close the "Hommrich loophole" in state law that governs private alternative-energy systems was referring to the name of a court case, not the solar energy executive who claimed the memo was defamatory in a revised lawsuit, the senator said in her renewed objections to the suit.

  • February 12, 2024

    Harvard Not Liable For Alleged Morgue Body Part Sales

    A Massachusetts judge ruled Monday that a state law makes Harvard University immune from a dozen lawsuits seeking to hold it liable after a former medical school morgue manager was criminally charged with stealing and selling body parts. 

  • February 12, 2024

    Customer Can Sue Closed Bowling Alley For Slip-And-Fall

    A Michigan appeals court won't spare the former operator of a Detroit-area bowling alley from a man's slip-and-fall lawsuit, saying she missed her opportunity to shutter her companies in such a way as to shorten the window when civil liability claims could be filed.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ex-Flight Attendant Wants JetBlue Sanctioned In Docs Fight

    JetBlue Airways Corp. should be held in contempt of court and sanctioned for failing to turn over documents in a former flight attendant's lawsuit over allegedly toxic fumes that she inhaled on the job, she and her husband have told a Connecticut federal court in a motion to force the airline's compliance with a subpoena.

  • February 12, 2024

    Construction Co. Gets Sanctions Nixed, Death Claims Tossed

    A Michigan appeals court has given a construction company a win in a suit alleging one of its drivers was liable for a man's death in a car accident, finding the trial court went too far in both levying sanctions for failing to preserve evidence and refusing to grant the company summary judgment.

  • February 12, 2024

    Jury's $600K Pit Bull Verdict Lacks Evidence, Calif. Panel Says

    A woman who was attacked by a pair of pit bulls that escaped from a leased residence won't get her piece of a $600,000 jury award from the landlords, as a California appellate panel has ruled that there was insufficient evidence showing that they knew the dogs were dangerous.

  • February 12, 2024

    Geico Says Medical Fraudsters Nabbed $1.1M In Auto Benefits

    Several unlicensed individuals submitted hundreds of fraudulent charges for services provided to Geico-insured car accident victims, the insurer has alleged in New York federal court, claiming it lost more than $1.1 million in the no-fault insurance fraud scheme.

Expert Analysis

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • How Color Psychology Can Help Tell Your Trial Narrative

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    Research shows that color is a powerful sensory input that affects memory and perception, so attorneys should understand how, when and why to use certain shades in trial graphics to enhance their narrative and draw jurors’ focus, says Adam Bloomberg at IMS Consulting.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Opinion

    FDA And Companies Must Move Quickly On Drug Recalls

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    When a drug doesn't work as promised — whether it causes harm, like eyedrops recalled last month by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or is merely useless, like a widely used decongestant ingredient recently acknowledged by the agency to be ineffective — the public must be notified in a timely manner, says Vineet Dubey at Custodio & Dubey.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • How Social Media Can Affect Trial Outcomes

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    With social media’s ability to seize upon an issue and spin it into a specifically designed narrative, it is more critical than ever that a litigation communications strategy be part of trial planning to manage the impact of legal action on a company's reputation, say Sean Murphy and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Opinion

    Civil Litigation Against Gun Businesses Can Reduce Violence

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    With mass shootings skyrocketing, and gun control legislation blocked by powerful interest groups, civil litigation can help obtain justice for victims by targeting parties responsible beyond the immediate perpetrator — including gun manufacturers, dealers and retailers, says Tom D'Amore at D'Amore Law Group.

  • Rite Aid's Reasons For Ch. 11 Go Beyond Opioid Suits

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    Despite opioid-related lawsuits being the perceived reason that pushed Rite Aid into bankruptcy, the company's recent Chapter 11 filing reveals its tenuous position in the pharmaceutical retail market, and only time will tell whether bankruptcy will right-size the company, says Daniel Gielchinsky at DGIM Law.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

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