Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • February 08, 2024

    Judge Urges NY Diocese, Abuse Claimants Into Ch. 11 Talks

    A New York bankruptcy judge sent the Roman Catholic Diocese of Rockville Centre's Chapter 11 plan disclosures and voting procedures back for another round of rewrites Thursday, while urging it and representatives of sexual abuse claimants into talks.

  • February 08, 2024

    Senate Committee Advances FAA Reauthorization Bill

    A U.S. Senate panel on Thursday advanced multiyear legislation reauthorizing the Federal Aviation Administration's safety and airport improvement programs, while also dedicating resources to hiring more air traffic controllers and inspectors, enhancing passenger protections, and integrating more drones and so-called air taxis.

  • February 08, 2024

    $1B DuPont Deal Gets Final OK In Firefighting Foam MDL

    A South Carolina federal judge on Thursday granted final approval to a $1.18 billion settlement involving chemical companies DuPont, Chemours and Corteva over drinking water polluted by so-called forever chemicals, dismissing objections raised by three Washington cities and the North Texas Municipal Water District, among others.

  • February 08, 2024

    DuPont Spinoffs Can't Escape PFAS Suit In NC

    The North Carolina Business Court ruled Wednesday that spinoff companies of DuPont have to pay up if the legacy business is found liable for contaminating the environment with "forever chemicals" in a lawsuit brought by the state attorney general.

  • February 08, 2024

    Fla. Justices Won't Reconsider Apex Doctrine Rule

    The Florida Supreme Court on Thursday refused a request from the state's attorney general to reconsider part of a decision formally adopting the apex doctrine, which makes it harder for opposing litigants to depose top officials, and extending its application to the private sector.

  • February 08, 2024

    11th Circ. Won't Undo State Farm's Shooting Coverage Loss

    The Eleventh Circuit refused Thursday to hear State Farm's challenge to a lower court decision ordering it to cover an $877,660 judgment for a gas station employee shot on the premises that he obtained against his employers, finding it lacked jurisdiction since the decision wasn't final or immediately appealable.

  • February 08, 2024

    2nd Circ. Appoints Goodwin To Suit Over Fake Pot In NY Jail

    The Second Circuit has revived an incarcerated man's lawsuit seeking damages for his exposure to secondhand smoke from synthetic cannabinoid illicitly smuggled into a jail in Orange County, New York, saying his case has "potential merit," and appointed Goodwin Procter LLP as his counsel.

  • February 08, 2024

    Mass Shooting Survivor Loses $17M Judgment On Appeal

    A Texas appellate court has overturned a mass shooting victim's $17 million judgment she won against a restaurant after accusing one of its managers of not sufficiently intervening, ruling that the food joint can't be held to account because the manager wasn't found to have had a responsibility to control the shooter.

  • February 08, 2024

    NTSB Accused Of Withholding Derailed Train Parts

    Rail car leasing firm GATX Corp. and chemical firm OxyVinyls LP asked an Ohio federal judge to force the National Transportation Safety Board to let them examine parts from the Norfolk Southern train that derailed in East Palestine last year, claiming the agency is holding out on them.

  • February 08, 2024

    NYC Police Union Can't 'Veto' NYPD Protest Deal, Judge Says

    A federal judge on Wednesday shot down a bid by New York City's largest police union to block a sweeping reform of police protocols for handling protests, saying the union could not torpedo a settlement that ended a high-profile, sprawling legal case arising out of the 2020 demonstrations against police brutality.

  • February 08, 2024

    Question On Wrongful Death Damages Sent To Ga. Justices

    A Georgia appeals court is kicking an appeal challenging $7.2 million in noneconomic damages in a wrongful death claim to the state's Supreme Court, saying the justices need to decide whether the state's $350,000 cap on such awards applies.

  • February 08, 2024

    NYC Jet Skier's Death Suit Not Covered, Insurer Says

    A jet ski tour company's row with the estate of a customer who died while on a tour does not qualify for defense or indemnity coverage, the company's insurer argued to a New York federal court, asserting that the company's alleged errors and omissions preclude coverage under its policy.

  • February 08, 2024

    Kidde-Fenwal's Ch. 11 Fee Examiner OKs $20.4M For 15 Firms

    The fee examiner appointed in fire-suppression company Kidde-Fenwal's Chapter 11 case has recommended that a Delaware bankruptcy judge approve $20.4 million in pay for 15 firms working on the proceedings, after they agreed to cut their requested compensation by about $333,000.

  • February 08, 2024

    Monsanto Fights $2.25B Verdict After Philly Roundup Trial

    Monsanto is fighting a Philadelphia jury's explosive $2.25 billion rebuke of its Roundup weedkiller in a cancer lawsuit, claiming that the judge overseeing the case made a strong string of unfair rulings such as allowing "inflammatory" testimony and "abusive" cross-examination.

  • February 08, 2024

    Live Nation Worker Can Fight $5.5M Disputed Atty Fee

    A New York appeals court on Thursday sustained a breach of contract counterclaim in a suit over $5.5 million in attorney fees against Morelli Law Firm PLLC stemming from a Live Nation event worker's historic $20 million personal injury award.

  • February 08, 2024

    Ex-BigLaw Atty Must Revamp Social Media Defamation Suit

    The social media influencer facing a $150 million defamation lawsuit claiming he misrepresented an ex-Greenberg Traurig LLP attorney's nightmarish divorce can breathe a sigh of relief — for now — as a Florida federal judge tossed the suit Thursday after finding it is "far longer than it needs be," but said most of it can proceed if refiled properly.

  • February 08, 2024

    Conn. Doc Says Website Must Unmask Fake Online Reviewer

    A Connecticut plastic surgeon asked a state court Wednesday to force the operator of website HealthGrades.com to unmask the person who posted an allegedly fake review saying she was "disfigured" by a recent procedure.

  • February 08, 2024

    Appeals Court Revives Suit From Janitor Assaulted By Priest

    A California appeals court reinstated a lawsuit from a janitor for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles who said she was pushed out of her job after being sexually assaulted by a pastor, ruling that a jury should decide whether the pastor's crime created intolerable working conditions.

  • February 08, 2024

    Ex-Billing Manager Says NJ Firm Put Fees Over Clients

    A former billing manager for the New Jersey personal injury firm Brandon J. Broderick Attorney At Law claims she was fired for insisting that the firm's clients receive the most money possible from their settlements, according to a lawsuit filed in New Jersey state court.

  • February 08, 2024

    Seattle Hospital Owes $215K In Mold Suit, Jury Finds

    A Seattle jury awarded $215,000 Thursday to three families whose children were prescribed antifungal treatment after being potentially exposed to toxic mold at Seattle Children's Hospital, concluding a bellwether damages trial and rejecting plaintiffs' request for far more. 

  • February 08, 2024

    Alex Jones Atty Calls Infowars 'Nonsense' In $1.4B Appeal

    Arguing in front of the shooting victims' families and squarely calling his client's broadcasts "nonsense," a lawyer for Alex Jones told the Connecticut Appellate Court on Thursday that $1.44 billion was too high a price for the Infowars website host's claims that the Sandy Hook school massacre was a "hoax."

  • February 08, 2024

    Morgan Lewis Adds Hawkins Parnell Toxic Tort Litigator In LA

    Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP is expanding its product liability team, bringing in a Hawkins Parnell & Young LLP mass tort trial attorney as a partner in its Los Angeles office.

  • February 07, 2024

    US Tells 9th Circ. Stem Cell Clinic Not Exempt From FDA Rules

    The federal government urged a Ninth Circuit panel Wednesday to revive its bid to stop a clinic from offering experimental stem cell treatments, arguing the clinic's procedures are governed by the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act because they result in a new product that is marketed as a cure for certain diseases. 

  • February 07, 2024

    Med Mal Case Dropped Before Wash. Justices Decide Blame

    A woman treated for injuries from a car crash has dropped her malpractice lawsuit against a hospital and a doctor, in a case a federal judge sent to the Washington Supreme Court to decide if the hospital could partially blame the patient for her injuries because she was driving while intoxicated.

  • February 07, 2024

    Fluoride Judge To Attys: 'I Don't Need Perry Mason Moments'

    A California federal judge presiding over a bench trial over fluoridated water's risks agreed to give the parties more time to present their cases Wednesday, but told counsel they haven't been "particularly efficient," and that "I don't need the Perry Mason moments — I just need to get to the issues."

Expert Analysis

  • Working With Emergency Services: Tips For Frontline Attys

    Author Photo

    The best version of a first responder-crisis lawyer relationship involves one where the first responder can trust the attorney enough to give them all the details, knowing they will exercise discretion in how much they release to the public, say Lauren Brogdon at Haynes Boone, Rick Crawford at the Los Angeles Fire Department and Christopher Sapienza at the Yonkers Police Department.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

    Author Photo

    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Analyzing The Legal Ripples Of The EPA's PFAS Regulation

    Author Photo

    As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency makes major moves on its pledge to regulate per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, the developing body of PFAS regulation will lead to an increase in litigation, and personal injury and product liability claims, say attorneys at Gordon & Rees.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

    Author Photo

    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • It's Time To Prescribe Frameworks For AI-Driven Health Care

    Author Photo

    As health care providers begin to adopt artificial intelligence in clinical settings, new legal and regulatory challenges are emerging, with the critical issue being balancing AI's benefits and innovations in health care while ensuring patient safety and provider accountability, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Ga. Ruling A Win For Plaintiffs Injured By Older Products

    Author Photo

    The Georgia Supreme Court's recent opinion in Ford Motor Co. v. Cosper gives plaintiffs the assurance that even if they are injured by older products, they can still bring claims under state law if the manufacturer used a design that it knew, or should have known, created a risk of substantial harm, says Rob Snyder at Cannella Snyder.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

    Author Photo

    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • How Cos. Can Prioritize Accessibility Amid Increase In Suits

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Justice's notice of proposed rulemaking on digital accessibility and recent legal proceedings regarding tester plaintiff standing in accessibility cases show websites and mobile apps are a growing focus, so businesses must proactively ensure digital content complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act, say attorneys at Hinckley Allen.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

    Author Photo

    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • Teach Your Witness About 'Good' And 'Bad' Testimony Words

    Author Photo

    To ensure honest and accurate testimony in trials and depositions, attorneys must take care to educate their witnesses about the problematic words opposing counsel may use, such as “always” and “must,” and the effective words they can use in response, like “potentially” and “depends,” say Steve Wood and Bill Kanasky at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Balancing Justice And Accountability In Opioid Bankruptcies

    Author Photo

    As Rite Aid joins other pharmaceutical companies in pursuing bankruptcy following the onslaught of state and federal litigation related to the opioid epidemic, courts and the country will have to reconcile the ideals of economic justice and accountability against the U.S. Constitution’s promise of a fresh start through bankruptcy, says Monique Hayes at DGIM Law.

  • What Justices' Cert. Denial Of Terrorism Suit Means For Banks

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's denial of certiorari in Freeman v. HSBC Holdings lets stand the Second Circuit's decision on the narrow scope of conspiracy liability under the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act, providing protection for banks that otherwise could have faced liability for finance activities with limited connections to third parties' unlawful acts, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Louisiana's Toxic Tort Barrier May Be Weakening

    Author Photo

    Louisiana's short prescriptive period to bring a survival action has long served as an important barrier against toxic tort claims, but the plaintiffs bar will likely rely on the recent Fifth Circuit decision in Jack v. Evonik to argue that anyone who arguably suffered injury based on exposure to some toxic substance may have a claim, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

    Author Photo

    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!