Project Finance

  • March 20, 2024

    Health And Safety Top Risk For Directors, Global Survey Says

    Health and safety is the top risk for directors and officers worldwide, according to a survey published Wednesday, in a "surprise" result partly attributed to the lingering impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on businesses and increasing mental health considerations.

  • March 20, 2024

    Mayer Brown Draws Energy Deals Pro From Clifford Chance

    Mayer Brown LLP has hired an energy transition and project finance expert, as the international firm looks to strengthen its energy transactions practice across Europe.

  • March 20, 2024

    Data Center Atty Welcomes Private Equity's Embrace

    Private equity's growing presence in the data center space is a boon for the sector and will help industry players build more facilities to meet growing demand for digital infrastructure, a partner in Paul Hastings' data center practice group told Law360.

  • March 20, 2024

    How The Supreme Court Could Narrow Chevron

    After hours of oral argument in a closely watched administrative law case, it appeared that some U.S. Supreme Court justices could be open to limiting the opportunities for lower courts to defer to federal agencies' legal interpretations in disputes over rulemaking — and legal experts said there are a number of ways they could do it.

  • March 20, 2024

    FCC Urged To Spend On School Firewalls, Not Wi-Fi Hotspots

    The Federal Communications Commission could better spend funds for education on beefed-up cybersecurity than on a controversial proposal for Wi-Fi hotspots, a broadband industry group told the agency.

  • March 20, 2024

    Feds Didn't Consider LNG Rule's Impact On Tribe, Court Told

    The Puyallup Tribe of Indians has fired back at the U.S. Department of Transportation's defense of a rule permitting bulk rail transport of liquefied natural gas, telling the D.C. Circuit the agency failed to engage in meaningful dialogue during the rule's development.

  • March 20, 2024

    Law360 Announces The Members Of Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is pleased to announce the formation of its 2024 Editorial Advisory Boards.

  • March 20, 2024

    US Chamber's Litigation Funding Concerns Spur 2 State Laws

    Amid concerns from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about third-party litigation funding, including from potentially hostile foreign entities, state legislatures in Indiana and West Virginia have recently passed bills imposing restrictions on the practice.

  • March 19, 2024

    Feds, NY Residents Spar Over Congestion Pricing Battle

    Federal and New York transportation agencies have told a Manhattan federal judge that local residents waited too late to file lawsuits trying to block congestion pricing, but the plaintiffs countered that the agencies have admitted that they'll have to reevaluate the environmental harms the new tolls would have on communities.

  • March 19, 2024

    Hydro Co. Asks FERC To Redo Tribe Opposition Permit Denial

    A Massachusetts company pursuing hydroelectric projects on Navajo Nation land is asking the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to revisit an order that denied preliminary permits because the nation opposed them, maintaining it has secured support from tribal entities to show otherwise — an assertion the nation's attorney general disputes.

  • March 19, 2024

    Faegre Drinker Adds Ex-DLA Piper Commodities Pro In Dallas

    Faegre Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP has strengthened its finance and restructuring practice in Dallas with partner Deanna Reitman, an experienced commodities lawyer who previously worked at DLA Piper.

  • March 18, 2024

    Investors Seek Arbitration In Panama Port Fight

    A group of companies and individuals invested in a port project near the Panama Canal's Atlantic Ocean entrance has asked a Delaware federal court to order arbitration in a Hong Kong company's case claiming its interest in the project is being stolen.

  • March 18, 2024

    Senate Dems Press Congress On Broadband Subsidy Renewal

    Nearly three dozen Senate Democrats urged the leadership of both chambers to restore funding for the Federal Communications Commission's broadband program as time runs short to continue paying consumer discounts for internet service.

  • March 18, 2024

    Tribal Health Groups Say IHS Owes $4M In Support Funding

    Two tribal health groups serving parts of Alaska are suing the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for failing to pay nearly $4 million in contract support costs for their delivery of services paid for with third-party revenue they collected, the subject of a matter now pending before the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • March 18, 2024

    Provider To Pay $100K Fine For 'Downselling' Broadband

    A fiber broadband provider in Texas and Louisiana has agreed to pay a $100,000 fine to the Federal Communications Commission for selling only its slowest service plan to customers in the Affordable Connectivity Program.

  • March 18, 2024

    Justices Tilt Toward NRA In Free Speech Row With Regulator

    A cautious U.S. Supreme Court seemed poised Monday to rule in favor of the National Rifle Association in a case over allegations that a former New York state official pressured financial institutions to cut ties to the National Rifle Association in violation of its free speech rights.

  • March 18, 2024

    FCC Raises Broadband Speeds, But Many ISPs Already There

    Many households across the country can already get the Federal Communications Commission's new benchmark for broadband internet, but making sure that level of service reaches rural and tribal areas remains a tough challenge.

  • March 18, 2024

    NextEra Moves For Victory In Texas Power Grid Law Row

    NextEra units want a Texas federal court to invalidate a state law reserving new power line development for incumbent transmission companies after the Lone Star State failed in its bid to overturn a Fifth Circuit opinion finding the measure unconstitutional.

  • March 18, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Multimillion-dollar e-cigarette settlements, $4 billion in stock buybacks and a $6.1 million appraisal tweak were among the big-dollar items logged in the Delaware Court of Chancery's ledger last week. Also on the docket: a Panama port project, a news outlet's defamation case, drone disputes and a flood of mail from Tesla shareholders. In case you missed it, here's all the latest from the Chancery Court.

  • March 15, 2024

    DC Circ. Presses FERC On Justification For Pipeline Expansion

    A D.C. Circuit panel on Friday questioned whether the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission had demonstrated that a Northeast pipeline expansion project was necessary to ensure that the region would have enough natural gas during extremely cold weather.

  • March 15, 2024

    Feds Streamline Historic Reviews For Broadband Projects

    The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation is heeding the call to make it easier for historical preservation checks to be done on any broadband projects that use federal funds, announcing that it will amend the rules to add that flexibility.

  • March 15, 2024

    Canadian Miner Seeks $200M In Arbitration Against Mexico

    A Canadian mining company plans to submit a claim for arbitration against Mexico over $200 million in alleged damages related to a precious metals deposit, saying the country has breached the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

  • March 15, 2024

    Divided 5th Circ. Rejects Atomic Waste Site Dispute Rehearing

    A narrowly divided Fifth Circuit has widened a circuit split by refusing to reconsider its ruling that U.S. nuclear energy regulators illegally approved an atomic waste site in West Texas, ruling the Lone Star State and mineral owners could challenge the decision without participating in the licensing process.

  • March 14, 2024

    Lawmakers Secure $1.3B For Native American Housing

    A record $1.34 billion will go toward Native American housing programs as part of an appropriations package passed by Congress, a $324 million increase over last year's funding.

  • March 14, 2024

    Tingo Sued In Del. For Docs On CEO Indictment, DOJ Probe

    A stockholder of Tingo Group Inc., a company controlled by a Nigerian man recently charged in connection with an allegedly "staggering" multinational fraud, has sued the business for books and records in Delaware's Court of Chancery, saying the documents are central to assessing next steps.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Securities Class Actions Show No Signs of Slowing In 2024

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    Plaintiffs asserted securities class actions at elevated levels in 2023 — a sign that filings will remain high in the year ahead — as they switched gears to target companies that allegedly have failed to anticipate supply chain disruptions, persistent inflation, rising interest rates and other macroeconomic headwinds, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • How DOI Aims To Modernize Resource Damage Assessments

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    The U.S. Department of the Interior's recent proposal to redesign its Type A rule for conducting natural resource damage assessment and restoration activities could lead to a more streamlined, flexible assessment process that would benefit both natural resource trustees and potentially responsible parties, says Brian Ferrasci-O'Malley at Nossaman.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • 5 Securities Litigation Issues To Watch In 2024

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    There is yet another exciting year ahead for securities litigation, starting with the U.S. Supreme Court hearing argument next week in a case presenting a key securities class action question that has eluded review for the last eight years, say attorneys at Willkie.

  • Growing Green Tech Demand Spells Trouble For Groundwater

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    Increasing demand for green technology is depleting the groundwater reserves used to extract and process the necessary minerals, making a fundamental shift toward more sustainable water use practices necessary at both the state and federal levels, says Sarah Mangelsdorf at Goldberg Segalla.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: South Africa

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    While South Africa has yet to mandate the reporting of nonfinancial and environmental, social, and corporate governance issues, policy documents and recent legislative developments are likely to have a material impact in the country's transition to a low-carbon economy and in meeting its international obligations, say Glynn Kent at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • 3 Power Rulings Change Outlook For Transmission Cos.

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    The cumulative effect of three December power cases that halted state actions that gave preference to incumbent transmission providers could level the playing field for independent developers, say Harvey Reiter and John McCaffrey at Stinson.

  • 4 Legal Ethics Considerations For The New Year

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    As attorneys and clients reset for a new year, now is a good time to take a step back and review some core ethical issues that attorneys should keep front of mind in 2024, including approaching generative artificial intelligence with caution and care, and avoiding pitfalls in outside counsel guidelines, say attorneys at HWG.

  • Environmental Justice: A 2023 Recap And 2024 Forecast

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    A 2023 executive order directing each federal agency to make environmental justice part of its mission, as well as the many lawsuits and enforcement actions last year, demonstrates that EJ will increasingly surface in all areas of law and regulation, from technically challenging to seemingly ordinary permitting and construction matters, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • What The Law Firm Of The Future Will Look Like

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    As the legal landscape shifts, it’s become increasingly clear that the BigLaw business model must adapt in four key ways to remain viable, from fostering workplace flexibility to embracing technology, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • 4 PR Pointers When Your Case Is In The News

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    Media coverage of new lawsuits exploded last year, demonstrating why defense attorneys should devise a public relations plan that complements their legal strategy, incorporating several objectives to balance ethical obligations and advocacy, say Nathan Burchfiel at Pinkston and Ryan June at Castañeda + Heidelman.

  • After Headwinds, 2024 May See Offshore Wind Momentum

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    Despite skyrocketing raw material costs, conflicting state and federal policies, and other setbacks for the offshore wind sector in 2023, the industry appears poised for growth in the coming year, with improving economics, more flexible procurement procedures and increasing legislative support, say Emily Huggins Jones and Ben Cowan at Locke Lord.

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