Public Policy

  • May 22, 2024

    Major County Sheriffs Seek FCC's OK For Axon Cameras

    Sheriffs from the largest U.S. counties called on the Federal Communications Commission to waive technical rules to allow law enforcement to use three new Axon camera devices.

  • May 22, 2024

    DeSantis Ducks Voters' Suit Over Fla. Prosecutor Suspension

    A Florida federal judge on Wednesday tossed voters' attempt to undo Gov. Ron DeSantis' suspension of elected prosecutor Monique Worrell, finding that the voters had not shown they were injured by the suspension.

  • May 22, 2024

    SC Gov. Signs Earned Wage Access Bill Into Law

    South Carolina has become the fifth state to approve a new law governing so-called earned wage access products, which provide workers with cash advances, as the Palmetto State joins Nevada, Missouri, Wisconsin and Kansas in regulating the products.

  • May 22, 2024

    EPA Urges Justices To Keep Ozone Fight In DC Circ.

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday urged the Supreme Court to keep seven consolidated challenges to the EPA's decision disapproving Utah's and Oklahoma's air quality plans in the D.C. Circuit.

  • May 22, 2024

    200th Lifetime Judge Confirmed Under Biden

    The U.S. Senate voted 66-28 on Wednesday to confirm U.S. Magistrate Judge Angela M. Martinez as U.S. district judge in the District of Arizona, marking the 200th lifetime federal judicial confirmation under President Joe Biden.

  • May 22, 2024

    NC County Sued Over 'Faithful Slaves' Courthouse Monument

    A group of residents of North Carolina's Tyrrell County has sued the county's board of commissioners in North Carolina federal court over an allegedly racist monument outside a courthouse that commemorates "faithful slaves" deemed loyal to the Confederacy during the American Civil War.

  • May 22, 2024

    Commerce Lifts Xanthan Gum Duty That Trade Court Rebuked

    The U.S. Department of Commerce reluctantly erased anti-dumping duties on Chinese xanthan gum after being twice rebuked by the U.S. Court of International Trade for penalizing a company with higher duties based on issues with its sales data.

  • May 22, 2024

    NY Federal Reserve Associate GC Rejoins Covington

    A former Covington & Burling LLP associate who left the firm 13 years ago to join the Federal Reserve Bank of New York has returned to work as of counsel, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • May 22, 2024

    DA Willis, Trump Judge, And Justice All Roll To Victory In Ga.

    The judge and district attorney at the center of former President Donald Trump's Georgia prosecution easily fended off their electoral challengers Tuesday night, while an abortion-rights candidate for the Peach State's highest court fell well short of the mark.

  • May 22, 2024

    Fla. Judge Blocks Immigrant Transport Law During Litigation

    A Florida federal judge on Wednesday temporarily blocked the state from enforcing a new law that criminalizes the transportation of unauthorized immigrants, saying the law intrudes on the federal government's authority over immigration matters.

  • May 22, 2024

    UK Dependency To Implement Pillar 2 Starting In 2025

    The island of Jersey, a U.K. crown dependency, said it would implement the international minimum tax for large corporations known as Pillar Two, with the law taking effect next year.

  • May 22, 2024

    CFPB Says Some Credit Card Standards Apply To BNPL Firms

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said Wednesday that shoppers using buy-now, pay-later products are covered by some of the same federal safeguards as those that apply to traditional credit cards, issuing the agency's first-ever guidance directed at this fintech-heavy field of financing.

  • May 21, 2024

    Ex-Pa. District Atty Gets 2 Years' Probation For Beating Wife

    A former district attorney for a Pennsylvania county was handed a two-year probationary sentence Tuesday after pleading no contest to hitting his wife three years ago, marking the second assault offense on his record for that year. 

  • May 21, 2024

    Minn. Poised To Join State Data Privacy Law Patchwork

    Minnesota is on the brink of becoming the latest state to enact comprehensive data privacy legislation, after the legislature sent to the governor's desk a measure that would give consumers more control over how companies use their personal information, including for profiling purposes, and require businesses to appoint a lead privacy official. 

  • May 21, 2024

    Willis And Judge In Ga. Election Case Win Their Elections

    Fulton County District Attorney Fani T. Willis and Fulton County Superior Court Judge Scott McAfee, two key figures in the Georgia election interference case against former President Donald Trump, won their elections Tuesday night.

  • May 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Vacates, Remands Tribe's Fishing Rights Dispute

    A Ninth Circuit panel said Tuesday that a challenge by a Washington tribe seeking to expand its fishing rights warrants further review, arguing that a lower court's ruling that a 19th century treaty did not include its accustomed grounds should be vacated and remanded to examine evidence of its village, presence and activities in the claimed waters. 

  • May 21, 2024

    Realtors Want Rethink After DOJ Antitrust Probe Allowed

    The National Association of Realtors has asked the D.C. Circuit for a rehearing after the appeals court found the U.S. Department of Justice can reopen an antitrust investigation into the trade group despite an earlier agency settlement over the association's rules.

  • May 21, 2024

    Calif. Justices Doubt App-Based Drivers' Prop 22 Challenge

    Several California Supreme Court justices pushed back Tuesday against arguments by ride-hailing drivers that the Proposition 22 ballot measure carving out certain app-based workers from a worker classification law unconstitutionally runs afoul of the Legislature's authority, with one justice saying their position could "freeze out" voter-approved initiatives.

  • May 21, 2024

    Feds Tell 5th Circ. To Ignore Park Skirmish In Razor Wire Row

    The federal government urged the Fifth Circuit to ignore a series of events surrounding concertina wire fencing Texas has erected along the U.S.-Mexico border, arguing the fight over a park has no bearing on whether a district court was wrong in refusing to ban border patrol agents from cutting the barrier.

  • May 21, 2024

    California Atty Takes Aim At Rhode Island Cannabis Program

    A California lawyer who has challenged state and local cannabis licensure programs across the country is accusing Rhode Island marijuana regulators of designing a plan to award cannabis retail licenses that unconstitutionally discriminates against out-of-state players.

  • May 21, 2024

    Sens. Challenge Pharma Lobbyist Over Patent Abuse

    U.S. senators from both sides of the aisle took turns at a Tuesday hearing questioning the pharmaceutical industry's top lobbyist over whether patent abuse plays a role in maintaining the high price of prescription drugs.

  • May 21, 2024

    Full 5th Circ. Urged To Rethink Blocking Student Loan Rule

    The U.S. Department of Education has asked the full Fifth Circuit to reconsider a recent preliminary injunction a three-judge panel ordered blocking changes to a program providing student loan forgiveness to borrowers defrauded by higher education institutions. It said the panel wrongly held that the department doesn't have the authority to determine whether a borrower has a valid defense to repayment.

  • May 21, 2024

    DC Circ. Says Drugmakers Can Limit Pharmacy Discounts

    The D.C. Circuit held Tuesday that a federal drug discount program does not bar manufacturers from restricting deliveries of discounted drugs to contract pharmacies, rejecting the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' expansive interpretation of the 340B drug pricing program.

  • May 21, 2024

    DOJ Drops Disability Bias Suit Over Minn. City's Nuisance Law

    The U.S. Department of Justice and the Minnesota city of Anoka asked a Minnesota federal judge on Tuesday to approve a proposed agreement that would end the DOJ's suit alleging that a local nuisance ordinance discriminated against tenants with mental health disabilities and the associates of those tenants.

  • May 21, 2024

    Mich. Judge Doubts Abortion Laws Pass Constitutional Muster

    A Michigan state judge on Tuesday was skeptical state regulators could impose a waiting period and other requirements on people seeking abortions without violating a state constitutional amendment enshrining the right to abortion.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    SC's Courts Have It Wrong On Amazon Marketplace Sales Tax

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    The South Carolina Supreme Court should step in and correct the misguided change in tax law effectuated by lower court rulings that found Amazon owes state sales tax for marketplace sales made prior to the U.S. Supreme Court’s Wayfair v. South Dakota decision in 2018, says Hayes Holderness at the University of Richmond.

  • What's In OCC's Proposed Freedom Of Information Act Update

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    In this article, Christine Docherty at Goodwin discusses the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency's proposed amendments to its regulations implementing the Freedom of Information Act, and how these changes might align with guidance from other regulators.

  • Assigning Liability In Key Bridge Collapse May Be Challenging

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    In the wake of a cargo ship's collision with Baltimore's Key Bridge last month, claimants may focus on the vessel's owners and the agencies responsible for the design and maintenance of the bridge — but allocating legal liability to either private or governmental entities may be difficult under applicable state and federal laws, says Clay Robbins at Wisner Baum.

  • Highlights From The 2024 ABA Antitrust Spring Meeting

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    U.S. merger enforcement and cartels figured heavily in this year's American Bar Association spring antitrust meeting, where one key takeaway included news that the Federal Trade Commission's anticipated changes to the Hart-Scott-Rodino form may be less dramatic than many originally feared, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • What FERC's Disclosure Demands Mean For Cos., Investors

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    Two recent Federal Energy Regulatory Commission orders reflect the commission's increasingly meticulous approach to reviewing corporate structures in applications for approval of proposed consolidations, acquisitions or changes in control — putting the onus on the regulated community to track and comply with ever-more-burdensome disclosure requirements, say attorneys at Willkie.

  • IRS Sings New Tune: Whistleblower Form Update Is Welcome

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    In a significant reform at the Internal Revenue Service's Whistleblower Office, the recently introduced revisions to the Form 211 whistleblower award application use new technology and a more intuitive approach to streamline the process of reporting allegations of tax fraud committed by wealthy individuals and companies, says Benjamin Calitri at Kohn Kohn.

  • Strategies For Challenging A Fla. Grand Jury Report's Release

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    A Florida grand jury’s recent report on potential wrongdoing related to COVID-19 vaccines should serve as a reminder to attorneys to review the myriad legal mechanisms available to challenge the lawfulness of a grand jury report’s publication and expunge the names of their clients, says Cary Aronovitz at Holland & Knight.

  • Macquarie Ruling Raises The Bar For Securities Fraud Claims

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last week in Macquarie Infrastructure v. Moab Partners — holding that a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule does not forbid omissions in company disclosures unless they render other statements false — is a major setback for plaintiffs pursuing securities fraud claims against corporations, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Tenn. Law Protecting Artists From AI Raises Novel Issues

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    Tennessee recently enacted a law that extends the right of publicity protection to individuals' voices in an attempt to control the proliferation of artificial intelligence in the music industry, presenting fascinating questions about the First Amendment, the fair use doctrine and more, say attorneys at Davis Wright.

  • Consumer Privacy Takeaways From FTC Extraterritorial Action

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    With what appears to be its first privacy-related consent agreement with a non-U.S. business, the Federal Trade Commission establishes that its reach is extraterritorial and that consumer internet browsing data is sensitive data, and there are lessons for any multinational business that handles consumer information, say Olivia Greer and Alexis Bello at Weil.

  • FDIC Bank Merger Reviews Could Get More Burdensome

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    Recently proposed changes to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. bank merger review process would expand the agency's administrative processes, impose new evidentiary burdens on parties around competitive effects and other statutory approval factors, and continue the trend of long and unpredictable processing periods, say attorneys at Simpson Thacher.

  • Calif. Housing Overhaul May Increase Pressure On Landlords

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    Two recently enacted California laws signal new protections and legal benefits for tenants, but also elevate landlords' financial exposure at a time when they are already facing multiple other hardships, says Laya Dogmetchi at Much Shelist.

  • A Look At Ex Parte Seizures 8 Years Post-DTSA

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    In the eight years since the Defend Trade Secrets Act was enacted, not much has changed for jurisprudence on ex parte seizures, but a few seminal rulings show that there still isn’t a bright line on what qualifies as extraordinary circumstances warranting a seizure, say attorneys at Finnegan.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • Navigating Kentucky's New Consumer Privacy Law

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    On April 4, Kentucky passed a new law that imposes obligations on affected businesses relating to the collection, use and sale of personal data — and those operating within the state must prepare for a new regulatory landscape governing the handling of consumer data, say Risa Boerner and Martha Vázquez at Fisher Phillips.

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