Public Policy

  • February 23, 2024

    Commerce Dept. Partly Waives 'Buy America' For BEAD

    The U.S. Department of Commerce on Friday announced limited waivers from "Buy America" requirements under the agency's $42.5 billion broadband deployment program to make sure that enough advanced components can flow to projects around the country.

  • February 23, 2024

    Judge Won't Reschedule Google's Ad Tech Trial In Va.

    A Virginia federal judge refused a request from Google on Friday to reschedule a slated September trial for the U.S. Department of Justice's ad tech monopolization case, saying the tech giant can overcome a potential timing conflict for its attorneys.

  • February 23, 2024

    Kraken Wants SEC Suit Tossed, Says Tokens Aren't Securities

    Crypto exchange Kraken on Friday urged a California federal judge to permanently toss claims it failed to register its platform with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission since the regulator has not shown that the tokens on its platform are investment contracts.

  • February 23, 2024

    Tobacco Cos. Look To Nix COPD Suit Decades After Diagnosis

    Tobacco companies R.J. Reynolds and Philip Morris asked a Massachusetts state judge on Friday to end a wrongful death lawsuit brought decades after a woman's COPD diagnosis and nearly three years after her death, pointing to a state high court ruling last summer that affirmed strict time limits for such claims.

  • February 23, 2024

    Idaho Blasts 'Abortion Mandate' In High Court State Ban Fight

    The Idaho attorney general has accused the federal government of transforming an emergency medical care law into an "abortion mandate" in a U.S. Supreme Court case pitting the state's criminal ban against the Biden administration's efforts to maintain abortion access post-Dobbs.

  • February 23, 2024

    Media, App Groups Wary Of Allowing Data Mining, AI Hacking

    Publishers and entertainment industry groups have urged the government to reject proposed exemptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act that would broaden protections for text-and-data mining and allow hackers to study biases in artificial intelligence models, raising concerns about infringement and cybersecurity.

  • February 23, 2024

    Conn. Justices OK $2.9M Cut To Power Co.'s Cost Recovery

    Connecticut's highest court on Friday held that state energy regulators properly trimmed a power company's annual cost recovery bid by more than $2.86 million, agreeing with a lower court that it was not arbitrary or capricious to decline to pass the expense to customers.

  • February 23, 2024

    ABA Report Says Electronic Monitoring Of Migrants Is Punitive

    The electronic monitoring of noncitizens by immigration authorities amounts to a form of detention that imposes a "considerable human toll" on immigrants and their families and may even violate constitutional guarantees of due process, according to a report commissioned by the American Bar Association that was released Friday.

  • February 23, 2024

    FDIC Slaps Small Tenn. Bank With Fintech Oversight Order

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. on Friday announced a consent order with a small Tennessee bank that stresses the risks of the bank's relationships with third-party fintech companies.

  • February 23, 2024

    1st Circ. Told Wind Farm's Approval Should've Been A Breeze

    A wind farm developer has asked the First Circuit to reject fishing groups' challenge to the U.S. Department of the Interior's approval of a proposed project off the coast of Martha's Vineyard, saying the effort to sink the plan can't survive because the agency did things by the book.

  • February 23, 2024

    NRA, LaPierre Found Liable For Misconduct In $6M Verdict

    A New York jury found Friday that the National Rifle Association, longtime CEO Wayne LaPierre and two other executives improperly used donor money, among other misconduct, ordering individual defendants to repay the gun rights group a total of $6.4 million.

  • February 23, 2024

    Nonprofit Fights To Keep Child Forced Labor Cocoa Suit Alive

    A nonprofit on Friday challenged U.S. Customs and Border Protection's bid to dismiss allegations the agency ignored a four-year petition to ban major chocolate companies from importing cocoa allegedly harvested by children, saying the delay harmed it by impairing its mission.

  • February 23, 2024

    Congress Must Fund Next-Gen 911, 9 Ex-FCC Chairs Say

    Nine former chairs of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission, who served under Democratic and Republican administrations, are urging congressional leadership to fully commit to implementing the next generation of 911.

  • February 23, 2024

    Ohio Chamber Backs Google In 'Common Carrier' Case

    Ohio's Chamber of Commerce is lining up behind tech behemoth Google in its battle to convince an Ohio court that it is not a common carrier while the state is trying to convince the court that Google is, so it may be banned from preferring its own products in its search results.

  • February 23, 2024

    UN Tax Pact May Need OECD Nations' Support, Diplomats Say

    The United Nations' global tax convention will likely require adoption by many advanced economies to address corporate tax abuse effectively, diplomats said, after countries resolved to pursue consensus over the long term but retain majority rule while drafting its terms of reference.

  • February 23, 2024

    VA Nixes Trans Vets' Request For Gender-Affirming Surgery

    The Department of Veterans Affairs said Thursday that it had formally rejected an 8-year-old petition for rulemaking by the Transgender American Veterans Association that sought to add gender-affirming surgery as part of VA-covered medical services, urging the Federal Circuit to toss TAVA's mandamus petition as moot.

  • February 23, 2024

    Feds Back ICE Contractor In 9th Circ. Detainee Wage Fight

    The federal government told the Ninth Circuit that immigrant detainees at contractor-run facilities aren't covered by state labor laws, backing GEO Group Inc.'s effort to overturn $23.2 million in judgments that found a detainee work program violated Washington's minimum wage law.

  • February 23, 2024

    Enviro Orgs. Target Sequoia Forest Restoration Projects

    Several conservation groups are asking a California federal judge to overturn U.S. Forest Service approvals for two post-fire forest restoration projects on parts of the Giant Sequoia National Monument and Sequoia National Forest, claiming they risk harming the sensitive landscapes and making matters worse.

  • February 23, 2024

    4 Trends Executive Compensation Attorneys Are Watching

    A Delaware Chancery judge's rejection of Elon Musk's $55 billion Tesla pay package shows how a court historically viewed as corporate-friendly may be shifting, one of several trends executive compensation experts told Law360 they're seeing. Here are four issues executive pay lawyers should have on their radar.

  • February 23, 2024

    US Gun Cos. Seek Time For Justices' Input On Mexico's Suit

    Gunmakers facing a recently revived lawsuit looking to hold them liable for firearms trafficking and cartel violence in Mexico on Friday asked a Boston federal judge to stand down and halt proceedings so the U.S. Supreme Court can have a chance to review the case.

  • February 23, 2024

    Groups Back Texas' Bid To Void Feds' Highway GHG Rule

    Construction trade groups have thrown their support behind the state of Texas' federal lawsuit seeking to vacate a new U.S. Department of Transportation rule requiring states to set targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from federally funded highway projects.

  • February 23, 2024

    Feds' Crypto Focus Is No Longer On 'Whack-A-Mole' Cases

    The U.S. Department of Justice is no longer playing "whack-a-mole" in its crypto cases, and instead is taking on large-scale actors in the hopes of encouraging industrywide compliance, veteran crypto-focused prosecutors with the Manhattan U.S. attorney's office said Friday.

  • February 23, 2024

    Trade Group Tells NC Justices COVID-19 Losses Not Covered

    A dozen North Carolina eateries are not owed coverage for pandemic-related losses, the American Property Casualty Insurance Association told the state's highest court, saying the policies at issue were never intended to cover economic damages "untethered" to physical loss or damage.

  • February 23, 2024

    Trump Flags Thousands Of Calls, Texts In Fani Willis DQ Bid

    As a bid to oust Fulton County District Attorney Fani T. Willis over her relationship with a prosecutor in Donald Trump's election interference case garners support, the former president pointed Friday to thousands of text messages and dozens of visits to back up the defense argument that the relationship began before Willis hired the prosecutor.

  • February 23, 2024

    With Interest, Trump Now Owes $454M For NY Valuation Fraud

    Donald Trump owes New York state nearly a half billion dollars after a county clerk on Friday tacked on $99 million in interest linked to a $355 million judgment in the state attorney general's civil fraud case against the former president last week.

Expert Analysis

  • Predicting DeFi Regulations At Home And Abroad In 2024

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    Though decentralized finance has advocates on both sides of the Atlantic in figures like U.S. SEC Commissioner Hester Peirce and U.K. Prime Minister Rishi Sunak, DeFi in 2024 seems likely to be folded into existing regulatory frameworks in the U.K. and EU, while anti-crypto scrutiny may discourage DeFi’s growth in the U.S., say Daniel Csefalvay and Eric Martin at BCLP.

  • Opinion

    Exxon Court Should Clarify Shareholder Proposal Exclusion

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    ExxonMobil last month took the unusual action of asking a Texas federal judge whether a proposal from climate activists seeking to limit oil and gas sales could be excluded from its 2024 proxy statement, and the court should use this opportunity to reevaluate SEC policy and set clear limits on when shareholder proposals can be included, says Stephen Bainbridge at UCLA School of Law.

  • Mitigating The Risk Of Post-Closing M&A Earnout Disputes

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    Today's uncertain deal environment makes a well-crafted earnout an excellent way for parties to accomplish a desired transaction that would not otherwise occur, but transacting parties also need to take key steps to avoid the risk of post-closing disputes that earnouts can present, say Chad Barton and Claire Lydiard at Holland & Knight.

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

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    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.

  • Understanding SEC's Focus Amid Lack Of Final AI Rules

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    Although the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's proposed rules to govern artificial intelligence are likely far from being finalized, understanding existing regulatory provisions that could address AI risks with respect to development, disclosure, compliance and data protection could help firms anticipate and avoid pitfalls, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • What's On The Horizon In Attorney General Enforcement

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    A look at recent attorney general actions, especially in the areas of antitrust and artificial intelligence, can help inform businesses on what they should expect in terms of enforcement trends as 10 attorney general races play out in 2024, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Reducing The Risk Of PFAS False Advertising Class Actions

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    A wave of class actions continues to pummel products that allegedly contain per- or polyfluoroalkyl substances, with plaintiffs challenging advertising that they say misleads consumers by implying an absence of PFAS — but there are steps companies can take to minimize risk, say attorneys at Keller and Heckman.

  • Planning For Stymied HSR Filings At FTC If Shutdown Occurs

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    If the government were to shut down in early March, the inability to submit Hart-Scott-Rodino filings with the Federal Trade Commission would grind transactions to a halt, and parties should consider numerous implications as they are negotiating or planning to close pending transactions, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • How High Court SEC Case Could Affect The ITC

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    While the U.S. Supreme Court’s upcoming ruling in U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission v. Jarkesy will likely spare the U.S. International Trade Commission from major operative changes, the ITC’s ability to issue penalties for violations of its orders may change, say Gwendolyn Tawresey and Ryan Deck at Troutman Pepper.

  • CFPB Overdraft Rule Could Mean Big Shift In Banking Biz

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    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has proposed "to close a longstanding loophole" in the Truth in Lending Act by changing how it regulates overdraft fees, but underneath the headline-grabbing proposal is a foundational shift in how the bureau views overdraft services, say attorneys at Katten.

  • Challenges Remain In Financing Energy Transition Minerals

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    COP28, the latest U.N. climate conference, reached a consensus on a just and equitable transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy, but more action and funding will be needed to ensure that developed countries responsibly source the minerals that will be critical for this process, say attorneys at Watson Farley.

  • USCIS Fee Increases May Have Unintended Consequences

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    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ new fee schedule, intended to provide the agency with needed funds while minimizing the impact of higher fees on individual immigrants and their families, shifts too much of the burden onto employers, say Juan Steevens and William Coffman at Mintz.

  • Navigating The FCC's Rules On AI-Generated Robocall Voices

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    The Federal Communications Commission's declaratory ruling issued last week extends the agency's regulatory reach under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act to calls that use artificial intelligence technology to generate voices, laying out a compliance roadmap, but not making AI-cloned voices in robocalls illegal per se, say attorneys at Wiley Rein.

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