Public Policy

  • February 16, 2024

    Fired Hospital Worker Can't Keep Fighting PTO Denial

    A maintenance worker who lost an administrative case alleging his ex-employer owed him money for unused paid time off when he was fired cannot try again to get a judgment in state court against the hospital where he worked or Michigan labor regulators, an appellate panel has found.

  • February 16, 2024

    Florida Loses Wetland Permitting Authority In D.C. Court Case

    A D.C. judge has stripped Florida of its federally delegated authority to permit wetlands development, ruling that U.S. environmental regulators failed to analyze the impact of their decision on endangered and threatened species and handing a victory to conservation groups challenging the program.

  • February 16, 2024

    Gov't Wants More Alaskan Native Reps On Subsistence Board

    The U.S. government has plans to strengthen Alaskan Native tribal representation on its Federal Subsistence Board, saying the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have proposed a new rule to add board members with personal experience of subsistence living in rural Alaska.

  • February 16, 2024

    NCAA, Hoopster Settle Dispute Over Betting Suspension

    The NCAA has settled a lawsuit brought by a Rutgers University basketball player who sued the organization earlier this month over claims it was trying to make him live out a punishment for sports betting violations that he had already served while a student-athlete at Iowa State University.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-FBI Field Boss Gets 28 Months For Foreign Payouts

    A former FBI field office supervisor was sentenced Friday to 28 months in prison for failing to disclose a $225,000 payment that he received from a former Albanian intelligence official while overseeing counterintelligence matters at the bureau.

  • February 16, 2024

    Feds Tell 1st Circ. Mass. Wind Farm Approval Was Sound

    The federal government has said a Massachusetts federal judge properly dumped a challenge lodged by commercial fishing groups seeking to upend federal approvals of the Vineyard Wind project, telling the First Circuit that the record shows federal agencies thoroughly studied the project's potential impacts.

  • February 16, 2024

    FTC Seeing Success After Merger Setbacks

    After the Federal Trade Commission suffered stinging setbacks in challenges to deals by Meta Platforms Inc. and Microsoft, the agency has started to turn things around with several transactions dropped in the face of challenges and a pair of court rulings reinforcing its approach to merger enforcement.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ape Farm Says Ga. Officials Monkeying With $300M Bond Deal

    The company behind a proposed — and highly controversial — 1.75 million-square-foot monkey rearing facility in southwest Georgia has taken its fight against local officials to federal court, accusing a development authority of trying amid public outcry to back out of a $300 million bond deal to finance the project.

  • February 16, 2024

    NJ Comptroller Gets Win In Suit Seeking To Block Subpoena

    A federal judge on Thursday tossed a suit from the CEO of a police training company alleging a subpoena from the New Jersey Office of the State Comptroller, or OSC, for his video testimony was retaliatory, ruling that the federal suit makes the same arguments that were already rejected in state court.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-DOJ Antitrust Director Named CFTC Whistleblower Head

    The Commodity Futures Trading Commission announced that the former acting litigation director of the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division was appointed director of its whistleblower office.

  • February 16, 2024

    House Lawmakers Unveil $66.3B Military, Border Bill

    A bipartisan group of U.S. House of Representatives lawmakers introduced legislation on Friday that would provide $66.32 billion to support Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan, as well as enact border reforms.

  • February 16, 2024

    Green Card Approvals Sink To All Time Low

    The United States' green card approval rate hit a historic low amid visa caps, with only 3% of those with pending green card applications on track to receive permanent residency in fiscal year 2024, the Cato Institute reported Thursday.

  • February 16, 2024

    2nd Circ. Shows How To Shut Down ERISA Self-Dealing Suits

    A recent Second Circuit decision affirming Goldman Sachs' win in a class action that took aim at proprietary funds in the bank's 401(k) plan provides an employer-side "road map" for staving off or defeating legal challenges to allegedly subpar in-house investment options, attorneys say.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-Ill. Senator Admits Campaign Fund Misuse After Trial

    A former Illinois state senator has admitted using campaign funds to buy trucks and recreational vehicles, pleading guilty to all counts after a three-day bench trial.

  • February 16, 2024

    Medtronic Urges 8th Circ. To Undo Transfer Pricing Ruling

    Medical device company Medtronic asked the Eighth Circuit on Friday to overturn a decision rejecting its pricing method for licensing intellectual property to its Puerto Rican affiliate, saying in the long-running case that Medtronic hadn't used the intercompany arrangement to underreport its income.

  • February 16, 2024

    White House Slams 'Cruel, Islamophobic Attacks' On Judicial Nom

    The White House on Friday mounted a defense of Adeel Mangi, a nominee to serve on the Third Circuit, who would be the first Muslim federal appeals court judge if confirmed and has come under vast attacks from Republican senators.

  • February 16, 2024

    Law Firms Call For Federal Courts To Favor Virtual Testimony

    A group of class action law firms and a Harvard Law School professor asked an advisory committee earlier this week to change federal court rules to prefer live virtual testimony over recorded deposition video for witnesses who can't appear in person in court.

  • February 16, 2024

    Pa. Man Who Beheaded Father Charged With Targeting Judge

    A Philadelphia-area man who allegedly shot his father and displayed his decapitated head on YouTube faces additional terrorism charges after investigators found he had made videos calling for violence against a federal judge and other government officials.

  • February 16, 2024

    Trump Owes $355M For Fraud That 'Shocks The Conscience'

    A New York state judge on Friday found Donald Trump, his adult sons, his companies and longtime executives liable for a decadelong valuation fraud conspiracy, ordering the defendants to disgorge $364 million in ill-gotten gains to the state, plus interest, with the former president on the hook for the lion's share.

  • February 16, 2024

    Janssen FCA Claims Not Barred By Old Cases, Judge Says

    Prior litigation that referred to Janssen Biotech's marketing practices does not bar a False Claims Act complaint from moving forward because the earlier cases did not allege the same type of fraud, a Massachusetts federal judge ruled Thursday.

  • February 16, 2024

    Quartz Biz Says Customs Charged Tariffs On Duty-Free Goods

    A quartz importer took U.S. Customs and Border Protection to court over its assessment of anti-dumping duties on dozens of quartz surface products that the U.S. Department of Commerce said should be imported duty-free.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fulton DA DQ Hearing Wraps With Fight Over Privilege

    The evidentiary hearing in Georgia over whether Fulton County District Attorney Fani T. Willis should be removed from the case against former President Donald Trump and his allies has concluded for the time being, a judge said Friday after nearly seven hours of testimony.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-DOJ Official Wants Witnesses Barred From DC Ethics Case

    Jeffrey Clark, who was an assistant attorney general for the U.S. Justice Department under President Donald Trump, has asked a District of Columbia ethics panel to block fellow former DOJ officials from testifying in a disciplinary proceeding resulting from his alleged role in promoting the former president's bogus stolen election claims.

  • February 15, 2024

    Trump Asks Justices To Give Time For DC Immunity Appeal

    Donald Trump made a final plea Thursday asking the U.S. Supreme Court to stay a D.C. Circuit panel's ruling that he is not immune from federal charges of interfering in the 2020 presidential election, slamming special counsel Jack Smith's bid to get on with the former president's trial.

  • February 15, 2024

    FTC Seeks To Crack Down On Using AI To Impersonate People

    The Federal Trade Commission on Thursday moved to broaden its recently finalized rule to combat government and business impersonation schemes to also cover scammers that use emerging artificial intelligence tools and other methods to impersonate individuals. 

Expert Analysis

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

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    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Directors And Officers Face Unique AI-Related Risks

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    As privacy, intellectual property and discrimination lawsuits focusing on artificial intelligence increase, corporate directors and officers must stay aware of associated risks, including those related to compliance, litigation and cybersecurity, says Jonathan Meer at Wilson Elser.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • The Questions Around Prometheum's SEC-Compliant Strategy

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    While the rest of the crypto industry has been engaged in a long-running battle to escape the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's jurisdiction, a once-obscure startup called Prometheum has instead embraced the SEC's view to become the first crypto special-purpose broker-dealer, but it's unclear whether it can turn its favored status into a workable business, says Keith Blackman at Bracewell.

  • How Russia Sanctions Bills Could Reshape Asset Forfeiture

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    Several U.S. legislative proposals to seize billions in frozen Russian assets for post-war reconstruction of Ukraine would bypass traditional asset forfeiture guardrails, making it crucially important that practitioners remain vigilant and understand when to proactively engage with the government, say attorneys at Kasowitz.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Reverse Merger Tips For Biotechs After SEC's Recent Actions

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    Several recent U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission developments could limit the viability of reverse mergers for biotech companies, and will require additional creativity and analysis for private companies looking to go public, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • CFPB's Proposed Overdraft Rule Evokes A Dickensian Tale

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    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's new proposed rule, declaring overdraft credit to be under Truth In Lending Act protection, creates tension between vigorous agency action and judicial concerns about administrative overreach that calls to mind Charles Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities," say Eric Mogilnicki and David Stein at Covington.

  • Opinion

    Aviation Watch: Navigating The Air Traffic Control Crisis

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    After a recent Federal Aviation Administration report identified significant deficiencies in air traffic control staffing, equipment and funding that compromise U.S. aviation safety, it is vital that the FAA act to limit the volume of traffic to what air traffic control can safely manage with available resources, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Considerations For Lawyer Witnesses After FTX Trial

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    Sam Bankman-Fried's recent trial testimony about his lawyers' involvement in FTX's business highlights the need for attorney-witnesses to understand privilege issues in order to avoid costly discovery disputes and, potentially, uncover critical evidence an adversary might seek to conceal, says Lawrence Bluestone at Genova Burns.

  • Opinion

    Stakeholder Amici Should Be Heard In Russian Trade Case

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    Although the U.S. Court of International Trade recently rejected U.S. Steel's amicus brief in NLMK Pennsylvania v. U.S., other industry stakeholders should seek to appear — and the court should allow it because additional perspectives will lead to a more informed ruling, say attorneys Jeffrey Shapiro and Michael Andrews.

  • Opinion

    Proposed Rule Misses The Mark On Improving MDLs

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    The Advisory Committee on Civil Rules' recently proposed rule on multidistrict litigation would provide some guidance for courts on managing MDLs — but without any requirement for the early vetting of claims, it is particularly unhelpful for defendants in pharmaceutical and product liability cases, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Parsing Treasury's Proposed Clean Hydrogen Tax Credit Rules

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    Regulations recently proposed by the IRS and the U.S. Department of the Treasury concerning two types of tax credits for clean hydrogen production facilities should resolve many of the most pressing questions around qualification for the credits — albeit in a relatively stringent manner, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Businesses Should Know About NJ Privacy Bill

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    New Jersey’s recently passed comprehensive privacy bill S.B. 332 presents businesses with a nuanced framework and compliance obligations, including opt-in consent requirements for sensitive data, with recommendations for businesses to organize data, review consent requirements and more, says Trisha Sircar at Katten.

  • Staying Ahead Of The AI Policymaking Curve

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    With artificial intelligence poised to be the hottest legislative and regulatory topic in 2024, expect the AI policymaking toolbox to continue to expand and evolve as stakeholders in the U.S. and abroad develop, deploy, use and learn more about these technologies, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

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