Courts

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    Trump Fights With State Over Cell Data Use In Willis DQ Bid

    District Attorney Fani T. Willis of Fulton County, Georgia, and former President Donald Trump are once again facing off in court, this time over whether cellphone data purporting to show late night visits between Willis and a special prosecutor can be used in a bid to disqualify Willis and her office from prosecuting the Georgia election interference case.

  • Fla. Judge Admits To Ethics Claims For Lengthy Case Backlog

    A Florida state judge whose backlog of pending judgments stretched more than two years has agreed to a public reprimand, expressing "regret that his actions have tarnished the judiciary, created hardships for the litigants' awaiting rulings, and potentially damaged the public's perception of an effective judicial system."

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    Bar-Takers See Accommodation Gap For Periods, Lactation

    As would-be lawyers prepare to take the bar exam, testing accommodations for those who menstruate or lactate will vary by jurisdiction. In recent years, there's been a reckoning on state bar policies that affect women and transgender test-takers, but advocates say there's more to be done.

  • Up Next At High Court: Social Media Laws & Bump Stocks

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments related to three big-ticket cases this week in a pair of First Amendment challenges to Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on their viewpoints and a dispute over the federal government's authority to ban bump stocks.

  • 'Rust' Set Was Open To Evidence Tampering, Jury Hears

    A New Mexico jury heard Friday that the possibility of evidence tampering both strengthened and weakened a manslaughter case against the armorer for the movie "Rust" in a trial over her role in the accidental fatal shooting of a cinematographer by Alec Baldwin.

  • Smirnov's Attys May Be Trying To Help Him Flee, Judge Says

    A California federal judge indicated Thursday that counsel for Alexander Smirnov, the former FBI informant charged with fabricating reports that President Joe Biden and his son took bribes from a Ukrainian company, are trying to get Smirnov released ahead of trial "likely to facilitate his absconding from the United States."

  • Yes, Justices Mainly Use Arguments To Talk To Each Other

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor confirmed Friday a common complaint from attorneys who've argued in front of her and her eight colleagues: The justices are most definitely using their questions at oral arguments to talk to each other, not the lawyers.

  • Md. Judge Won't Toss Ex-Baltimore State's Atty's Conviction

    A Maryland federal judge has refused to acquit former Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby of lying on mortgage applications for a vacation home, rejecting her contention that charges were brought in the wrong venue and finding that prosecutors put forward sufficient evidence for a reasonable jury to find her guilty.

  • Gov.'s Romantic Ties To Top Court Pick May Spark Recusals

    Massachusetts Gov. Maura Healey's selection of a former romantic partner to serve on the state's Supreme Judicial Court could be grounds for the justice to recuse herself from certain cases, though those scenarios would be relatively rare, legal ethics experts told Law360.

  • Colo. Judge Rejects Trump's Atty Fee Bid In Ballot DQ Suit

    A Colorado state judge has denied former President Donald Trump's bid for over $165,000 in attorney fees in a lawsuit seeking to bar him from the ballot in the upcoming presidential election, with the judge finding one of the dropped claims was not frivolous.

  • DC Appeals Panel Receptive To Ex-DOJ Atty's Subpoena Fight

    A D.C. Court of Appeals panel on Friday appeared open to former U.S. Department of Justice attorney Jeffrey Clark's request that the court reconsider enforcing a subpoena from the D.C. bar's disciplinary counsel pursuing ethics charges against Clark for his alleged role in promoting Donald Trump's false election fraud narrative.

  • Feds' Crypto Focus Is No Longer On 'Whack-A-Mole' Cases

    The U.S. Department of Justice is no longer playing "whack-a-mole" in its crypto cases, and instead is taking on large-scale actors in the hopes of encouraging industrywide compliance, veteran crypto-focused prosecutors with the Manhattan U.S. attorney's office said Friday.

  • Alec Baldwin Loss Claims Trimmed In 'Rust' Shooting Suit

    A California judge has dismissed with leave to amend loss of consortium claims against Alec Baldwin and El Dorado Pictures Inc. by the family of the cinematographer who was shot and killed on the set of "Rust," saying they had not alleged a close enough relationship to her to sustain the claims under New Mexico law.

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    The Supreme Court's Week: By The Numbers

    The justices issued two unanimous opinions this week involving double jeopardy and maritime law, but they were in less agreement during four oral arguments, particularly one over an environmental rule on the court's emergency docket. Here, Law360 Pulse takes a data-driven dive into the week that was at the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • Trump Flags Thousands Of Calls, Texts In Fani Willis DQ Bid

    As a bid to oust Fulton County District Attorney Fani T. Willis over her relationship with a prosecutor in Donald Trump's election interference case garners support, the former president pointed Friday to thousands of text messages and dozens of visits to back up the defense argument that the relationship began before Willis hired the prosecutor.

  • Mich. Ex-Judge Disbarred For Sending Explicit Texts To Client

    A former Michigan state chief judge was disbarred after he sent sexually explicit text messages to a client, encouraged that client to drink while they were on probation, and practiced while his license was suspended following a drunk driving plea.

  • Fla. Fraud Convict Says His Prosecutors Weren't Authorized

    A Florida man serving time in federal prison for investment fraud argued in a complaint on Friday that the assistant U.S. attorneys assigned to his case were not authorized to prosecute him.

  • NY Clerk Defends Barring Felons From Juries In Dismissal Bid

    New York County's commissioner of jurors has urged a federal judge to dismiss a Black public defender's racial bias suit challenging the Manhattan court system's exclusion of people with felony convictions from juries, arguing the attorney fails to allege the exclusion was applied with a discriminatory motive or in a discriminatory way.

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    ACLU Kicks Off Clemency Project To Reduce NJ Incarceration

    The American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey has launched a new initiative aimed at reducing sentences for incarcerated victims of domestic violence and people facing extreme trial penalties, advocating for a framework that calls on the governor to holistically consider injustices facing those groups of people when making decisions on clemency.

  • Trump Says He Has Immunity In Classified Docs Case

    Former President Donald Trump filed a slew of motions late Thursday night asking a Florida federal judge to dismiss the criminal charges against him over the alleged mishandling of classified documents at his Mar-a-Lago estate, arguing that he has presidential immunity from prosecution and that the appointment of the special counsel is unlawful.

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    Voir Dire: Law360 Pulse's Weekly Quiz

    This was another busy week for the legal industry as law firms expanded their practices and attorneys made moves. Test your legal news savvy here with Law360 Pulse’s weekly quiz.

  • Calif. Judges Get Guidance On When To Report Atty Misconduct

    California judges need not always report attorney misconduct to the state bar, according to the latest opinion issued by the California Supreme Court's ethics watchdog on Thursday, advising when judges are compelled to report attorney misdeeds.

  • Trump Atty Sanctioned For Filing IP Suit On Gut Feelings

    A Florida federal judge has sanctioned an attorney who said he could "just know" if a product infringed his client's patents, rather than conducting a factual investigation — a move that the attorney claimed was backlash for representing former President Donald Trump elsewhere.

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    US Can't Appeal Order To Give Avenatti's Tax Info To Trustee

    A California federal judge declined Wednesday to allow the U.S. to appeal a bankruptcy court's decision ordering Michael Avenatti's tax returns to be released to the trustee overseeing the estate of Eagan Avenatti LLP's bankruptcy, finding the decision to be unappealable, and Avenatti himself hasn't objected to the disclosure.

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    Was Armorer 'Sloppy' Or 'Scapegoat'? 'Rust' Trial Opens

    An attorney for film prop weapons expert Hannah Gutierrez-Reed told a New Mexico state jury during opening statements in her involuntary manslaughter trial Thursday that the producers of "Rust," including actor Alec Baldwin, used the young armorer as a "scapegoat" in the fatal on-set shooting of a cinematographer.

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Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can I Turn Deferral To My Advantage? Author Photo

    Diana Leiden at Winston & Strawn discusses how first-year associates whose law firm start dates have been deferred can use the downtime to hone their skills, help their communities, and focus on returning to BigLaw with valuable contacts and out-of-the-box insights.

  • Resume Gaps Are No Longer Kryptonite To Your Legal Career Author Photo

    Female attorneys and others who pause their careers for a few years will find that gaps in work history are increasingly acceptable among legal employers, meaning with some networking, retraining and a few other strategies, lawyers can successfully reenter the workforce, says Jill Backer at Ave Maria School of Law.

  • Law Firm Guardrails For Responsible Generative AI Use Author Photo

    ChatGPT and other generative artificial intelligence tools pose significant risks to the integrity of legal work, but the key for law firms is not to ban these tools, but to implement them responsibly and with appropriate safeguards, say Natalie Pierce and Stephanie Goutos at Gunderson Dettmer.

  • Opinion

    We Must Continue DEI Efforts Despite High Court Headwinds Author Photo

    Though the U.S. Supreme Court recently struck down affirmative action in higher education, law firms and their clients must keep up the legal industry’s recent momentum advancing diversity, equity and inclusion in the profession in order to help achieve a just and prosperous society for all, says Angela Winfield at the Law School Admission Council.

  • Law Firms Cannot Ignore Attorneys' Personal Cybersecurity Author Photo

    Law firms that fail to consider their attorneys' online habits away from work are not using their best efforts to protect client information and are simplifying the job of plaintiffs attorneys in the case of a breach, say Mark Hurley and Carmine Cicalese at Digital Privacy and Protection.

  • Why Writing CLE Should Be Mandatory For Lawyers Author Photo

    Though effective writing is foundational to law, no state requires attorneys to take continuing legal education in this skill — something that must change if today's attorneys are to have the communication abilities they need to fulfill their professional and ethical duties to their clients, colleagues and courts, says Diana Simon at the University of Arizona.

  • How To Find Your Inner Calm When Client Obligations Pile Up Author Photo

    In the most stressful times for attorneys, when several transactions for different partners and clients peak at the same time and the phone won’t stop buzzing, incremental lifestyle changes can truly make a difference, says Lindsey Hughes at Haynes Boone.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can I Support Gen Z Attorneys? Author Photo

    Meredith Beuchaw at Lowenstein Sandler discusses how senior attorneys can assist the newest generation of attorneys by championing their pursuit of a healthy work-life balance and providing the hands-on mentorship opportunities they missed out on during the pandemic.

  • Firm Tips For Helping New Lawyers Succeed Post-Pandemic Author Photo

    Ten steps can help firms significantly enhance the experience of attorneys who started their careers in the coronavirus pandemic era, including facilitating opportunities for cross-firm connection, which can ultimately help build momentum for business development, says Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners.

  • Advice For Summer Associates Uneasy About Offer Prospects Author Photo

    There are a few communication tips that law students in summer associate programs should consider to put themselves in the best possible position to receive an offer, and firms can also take steps to support those to whom they are unable to make an offer, says Amy Mattock at Georgetown University Law Center.

  • How Law Firms Can Cautiously Wield AI To Streamline Tasks Author Photo

    Many attorneys are going to use artificial intelligence tools whether law firms like it or not, so firms should educate them on AI's benefits, limits and practical uses, such as drafting legal documents, to remain competitive in a rapidly evolving legal market, say Thomas Schultz and Eden Bernstein at Kellogg Hansen.

  • Keys To Managing The Stresses Of Law School Author Photo

    Dealing with the pressures associated with law school can prove difficult for many future lawyers, but there are steps students can take to manage stress — and schools can help too, say Ryan Zajic and Dr. Janani Krishnaswami at UWorld.

  • Can Mandatory CLE Mitigate Implicit Bias's Negative Impacts? Author Photo

    Amid ongoing disagreements on whether states should mandate implicit bias training as part of attorneys' continuing legal education requirements, Stephanie Wilson at Reed Smith looks at how unconscious attitudes or stereotypes adversely affect legal practice, and whether mandatory training programs can help.

  • Ditch The Frills And Start Writing Legal Letters In Plain English Author Photo

    To become more effective advocates, lawyers need to rethink the ridiculous, convoluted language they use in correspondence and write letters in a clear, concise and direct manner, says legal writing instructor Stuart Teicher.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can I Negotiate My Separation Agreement? Author Photo

    Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey discusses how a law firm associate can navigate being laid off, what to look for in a separation agreement and why to be upfront about it with prospective employers.

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