Courts

  • NY Panel Rejects NYCLU Demand For Memos To State Judges

    A New York state appellate court said the state's court system is not bound to comply with a request by the New York Civil Liberties Union to disclose internal documents interpreting federal and state law that were sent to judges over the course of more than a decade.

  • Feds Seek Over 5 Years For NYC Atty In $18.8M Ponzi Scheme

    Federal prosecutors are seeking 5¼ to 6½ years in prison for a New York City attorney who admitted to running an $18.8 million Ponzi scheme that defrauded real estate investors, in addition to separately laundering funds from an expansive insurance fraud scheme.

  • Voir Dire: Law360 Pulse's Weekly Quiz

    This was another busy week for the legal industry as BigLaw expanded its reach and big names made headlines after court. Test your legal news savvy here with Law360 Pulse’s weekly quiz.

  • Feds Ask High Court To Block 'Ghost Gun' Exemption

    The federal government is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to step in and block an injunction exempting two companies that sell so-called ghost guns, which lack serial numbers, from a rule classifying the kits as firearms, saying the Fifth Circuit's current ruling creates a loophole that will result in a "flood" of untraceable weapons in the country.

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    Krieger Kim & Lewin Reshuffle As Name Partner Rejoins SDNY

    Krieger Kim & Lewin LLP is changing its name and taking on a new partner as one of the former federal prosecutors who founded the boutique rejoins the U.S. Attorney's Office in the Southern District of New York, the firm announced Friday.  

  • Ex-Trump Aide Peter Navarro Can't Stay Free During Appeal

    A District of Columbia federal judge on Thursday refused to allow former White House adviser Peter Navarro to remain outside of prison while he appeals his sentence for refusing to comply with congressional subpoenas, rejecting Navarro's argument that his appeal raises a "substantial question of law" warranting his release.

  • 5 Key Takeaways From Justices' Trump DQ Arguments

    A special U.S. Supreme Court session Thursday examining Colorado's removal of former President Donald Trump from its primary ballot was dominated by debate over a state's authority to do so, but the justices also found time to examine Reconstruction-era language choices and weigh the benefits of relying on ancient case law — while mostly avoiding the question of Trump's participation in an insurrection.

  • Ga. Judicial Watchdog Wants Probate Judge Ousted

    The long-running trial of a Georgia probate judge accused of violating the state's Code of Judicial Conduct on social media and jailing a woman seeking to amend her marriage record wrapped Thursday, with the head of the state's judicial watchdog arguing she should be removed from the bench.

  • Baltimore Judge To Face Hearing Over Claims He Groped Atty

    A Baltimore city district court judge is set to face a judicial ethics hearing in May over allegations that he repeatedly touched a lawyer without her consent following a bar association event, while he apologized for making the woman uncomfortable and said he genuinely thought she had been flirting with him.

  • 11th Circ. Says Ex-USF Law Prof. Can't Sue Without A Lawyer

    The Eleventh Circuit upheld on Thursday a lower court's order barring a former University of South Florida law professor from filing additional cases against her former employer without another attorney's signature, finding nothing wrong with the district court controlling its docket in the face of her repeated lawsuits.

  • 1st Amendment Limited In Court, Prosecutor Tells 6th Circ.

    The First Amendment "is not without limit in a courtroom setting," says a Michigan county prosecutor who is trying to convince the Sixth Circuit not to disturb a ruling that upholds the state's prohibition on recording livestreaming court proceedings.

  • Doctor In NBA Fraud Case Can Ditch Atty Over Plea Squabble

    A Seattle physician accused of taking part in a healthcare fraud scheme orchestrated by former NBA players may drop his court-appointed attorney and represent himself in the New York criminal trial, a federal judge in Manhattan ordered, approving the move after the doctor claimed the lawyer refused to withdraw his guilty plea.

  • Judicial Nominee Assures GOP Sens. She's Not A Marxist

    Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee raised concerns about two U.S. district court nominees appearing before the committee on Thursday over their supposed ties to Marxism and the defund the police campaign, but the nominees tried to disabuse lawmakers of that suggestion.

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    NJ Superior Court Hopefuls Greenlighted By Senate Panel

    The New Jersey Senate's Judiciary Committee on Thursday advanced three nominees for the short-staffed state Superior Court who have served in local government and approved the formal nomination of Essex County's acting prosecutor of six years.

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    Ex-NJ Judge Suspended From Law Practice Over Groping

    The New Jersey Supreme Court handed down a one-year suspension from practicing law to a former North Bergen municipal court judge who was previously permanently barred from being a judge for groping a woman and being dishonest about the incident in the judicial ethics case against him.

  • Ga. DA Moves To Quash Trump Co-Defendant Subpoenas

    Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis has moved to quash subpoenas that would require her, members of her staff and the attorney who represented special prosecutor Nathan Wade in his divorce to testify during a hearing on whether she should be disqualified from prosecuting the Georgia election interference case.

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    Justices Doubtful Of States' Power To DQ Trump

    U.S. Supreme Court justices were deeply skeptical Thursday that states have the authority to bar Donald Trump from the ballot under the 14th Amendment, repeatedly questioning why Colorado should be allowed to potentially decide the course of the 2024 presidential election.

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    High Court Sides With Whistleblower Against UBS

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday found that whistleblowers don't need to show retaliatory intent on the part of their employers in order to be protected under federal law, in a unanimous ruling in favor of a former UBS employee and whistleblower who fought to restore a $900,000 jury verdict he secured in 2017.

  • Justices Rule Gov't Agencies Not Immune From FCRA Suits

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a person can sue a government agency under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, because the law's 1970 definition of a "person" was sufficient to waive the government's immunity.

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    Judge Newman's Options Dwindle After Suspension Is Upheld

    Following Wednesday's decision by the national panel that reviews judicial misconduct cases upholding Federal Circuit Judge Pauline Newman's suspension, she faces a difficult path to getting reinstated without complying with an investigation into her mental fitness, experts say.

  • Fla. Ex-Judge Seeks Lighter Penalty Over Inflated Finances

    A former Florida county court judge urged the state's high court on Wednesday to impose a minimum one-year rehabilitative suspension for inflating campaign finances rather than disbarment, arguing that other attorneys have received lighter punishments under comparable circumstances.

  • GOP Sens. Probe 3rd Circ. Pick's Ties To Rutgers Program

    Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee are looking into a Rutgers Law School program at the center of their objections to the president's nominee for the Third Circuit, who would be the first Muslim federal appeals court judge if confirmed.

  • Ill. Atty's Conviction Over Embezzlement Scheme Sticks

    A former attorney who cried "wolf" over the government preventing him from adequately preparing for trial cannot unwind his conviction for misappropriating a now-shuttered bank's embezzled funds and lying about his assets, an Illinois federal judge ruled Tuesday.

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    Jackson Walker Steps Down From 4E Ch. 11 Amid Fees Probe

    Jackson Walker LLP, the firm at the center of a legal ethics scandal over the undisclosed relationship between a lawyer and a bankruptcy judge, has stepped down as Chapter 11 counsel to hand sanitizer maker 4E Brands Northamerica LLC as a Texas bankruptcy judge considers revoking $800,000 in legal fees paid to the firm in the case.

  • Ex-NJ Judge Says Femininity Bias Keeps Workplace Suit Alive

    A former New Jersey state judge called on a federal court Tuesday to reject court officials' bid to dismiss the remaining claims in her workplace discrimination lawsuit, arguing that her superiors' attitude about her pricey handbags and jewelry amounts to gender bias.

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Expert Analysis

  • Law Firms Must Prioritize Mental Health In Internal Comms Author Photo

    The traditional structure of law firms, with their compartmentalization into silos, is an inherent challenge to mental wellness, so partners and senior lawyers should take steps to construct and disseminate internal action plans and encourage open dialogue, says Elizabeth Ortega at ECO Strategic Communications.

  • Our Current Approach To Trial Advocacy Training Is Lacking Author Photo

    The key to trial advocacy is persuasion, but current training programs focus almost entirely on technique, making it imperative that lawyers are taught to be effective storytellers and to connect with their audiences, says Chris Arledge at Ellis George.

  • How Women In Law Can Advance Toward Leadership Roles Author Photo

    Female attorneys in leadership roles inspire other women to pursue similar opportunities in a male-dominated field, and for those who aspire to lead, prioritizing collaboration, inclusivity and integrity is key, says Kim Yelkin at Foley & Lardner.

  • The Case That Took Me From Prosecutor To Defense Attorney Author Photo

    Former Assistant U.S. Attorney Moira Penza, now at Wilkinson Stekloff, recalls the challenges of her first case as a civil defense attorney — a multibillion-dollar multidistrict class action against Allergan — and the lessons she learned about building rapport in the courtroom and with co-counsel.

  • The Importance Of Legal Macroeconomics Education For Attys Author Photo

    Most legal professionals lack understanding of the macroeconomic trends unique to the legal industry, like the rising cost of law school and legal services, which contributes to an unfair and inaccessible justice system, so law school courses and continuing legal education requirements in this area are essential, says Bob Glaves at the Chicago Bar Foundation.

  • Opinion

    It's Time To Hold DC Judges Accountable For Misconduct Author Photo

    On the heels of Thursday's congressional hearing on workplace protections for judiciary employees, former law clerk Aliza Shatzman recounts her experience of harassment by a D.C. Superior Court judge — and argues that the proposed Judiciary Accountability Act, which would extend vital anti-discrimination protections to federal court employees, should also include D.C. courts.

  • What ABA Student Well-Being Standards Mean For Law Firms Author Photo

    While the American Bar Association's recent amendments to its law school accreditation standards around student well-being could have gone further, legal industry employers have much to learn from the ABA's move and the well-being movement that continues to gain traction in law schools, says David Jaffe at the American University Washington College of Law.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Do I Build Rapport In New In-House Role? Author Photo

    Tim Parilla at LinkSquares explains how new in-house lawyers can start developing relationships with colleagues both within and outside their legal departments in order to expand their networks, build their brands and carve their paths to leadership positions.

  • What Attys Should Consider Before Taking On Pro Bono Work
    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Piper Hoffman and Will Lowrey at Animal Outlook lay out suggestions for attorneys to maximize the value of their pro bono efforts, from crafting engagement letters to balancing workloads — and they explain how these principles can foster a more rewarding engagement for both lawyers and nonprofits.

  • Opinion

    NY Bar Admission Criminal History Query Is Unjust, Illegal Author Photo

    New York should revise Question 26 on its bar admission application, because requiring students to disclose any prior interaction with the criminal justice system disproportionately affects people of color, who have a history of being overpoliced — and it violates several state laws, says Andrew Brown, president of the New York State Bar Association.

  • 7 Ways Attys Can Improve Their LinkedIn Summaries Author Photo

    Lawyers can use LinkedIn to strengthen their thought leadership position, generate new business, explore career opportunities, and better position themselves and their firms in search results by writing a well-composed, optimized summary that demonstrates their knowledge and experience, says Guy Alvarez at Good2bSocial.

  • How Law Firms And Attys Can Combat Imposter Syndrome Author Photo

    Imposter syndrome is rampant in the legal profession, especially among lawyers from underrepresented backgrounds, leading to missed opportunities and mental health issues — but firms can provide support in numerous ways, and attorneys can use therapeutic strategies to quiet their inner critic, says Helen Pamely at Rosling King.

  • The Law Firm Qualities Partners Seek In Lateral Moves Author Photo

    In 2022, partners considering lateral moves have new priorities, and firms that hope to recruit top talent will need to communicate their strategy for growth, engage on hot issues like origination credit and diversity initiatives, and tailor their integration plans toward expanding partners’ client base, says Gloria Sandrino at Lateral Link.

  • Small Steps Can Help Employers Beat Attorney Burnout Author Photo

    Lawyers are experiencing burnout on a massive, unprecedented scale due to the pandemic, but law firms and institutional players can and should make a difference by focusing on small, practical solutions that protect their attorneys’ most precious personal resource and professional commodity — time, says Chad Sarchio, president of the District of Columbia Bar.

  • The Evolving Role Of The Law Firm Legal Secretary Author Photo

    Technological shifts during the pandemic and beyond should force firms to rethink how legal secretaries can not only better support timekeepers but also participate in elevating client service, bifurcating the role into an administrative support position and a more elevated practice support role, says Lauren Chung at HBR Consulting.

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