Courts

  • From Farm Tiffs To Time-Warner Battles, Glasscock Saw It All

    Vice Chancellor Sam Glasscock III, due to retire later this year, presided over a wide-ranging caseload during his long Court of Chancery career. Since joining the court, initially as a master in chancery — a position now dubbed magistrate in chancery — he took on litigation that included disputes involving some of the country's largest corporations, while also juggling cases as local as illegal junkyard disputes and, in one instance, a deep dive into colonial-era land records in a dueling deeds lawsuit.

  • Ex-Atty Who Lied To Grand Jury About Frauds Gets 6.5 Years

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced a disbarred lawyer to six and a half years in prison Thursday for his 14-year, $17 million real estate Ponzi scheme, for laundering insurance scam proceeds and for his "unheard of" step of lying to a grand jury.

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    4E Agent Floats Plan To Hand Disputed Atty Fees To Creditors

    The Chapter 11 agent for hand sanitizer maker 4E Brands Northamerica LLC has asked a Texas bankruptcy judge to approve a modified reorganization plan that would allow unsecured creditors to recover fees that Jackson Walker LLP may be forced to disgorge over an ethics scandal involving a former partner.

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    Chancery Caseload Concerns Persist, Del. Chief Justice Says

    As the Delaware Chancery Court prepares for the departure of another one of its longest-serving judges, the First State's chief justice told state legislators Thursday that more help is needed to address ongoing concerns about burnout on the bench.

  • Petition Watch: Classes, Litigation Changes & Fraud Theories

    The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of petitions for review each term, but only a few make the news. Here, Law360 looks at four petitions filed in the past three weeks that you might've missed, including questions over how courts should analyze class certification bids and regulations restricting specific speech for content-neutral reasons, whether plaintiffs must reestablish standing after amending lawsuits, and what constitutes fraud.

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    Snapshot: Delaware Judiciary's 2023 Annual Report

    Delaware's state courts have managed to mostly dig out of pandemic-related backlogs, but two of its courts recognized nationally for expertise in handling complex corporate matters continue to grapple with busy caseloads, according to the judiciary's annual report, which was released Thursday.

  • Conn. Judges' Backgrounds Affect Housing Cases: Study

    Connecticut renters are more likely to face harsher judgments in housing proceedings before a judge with a corporate or prosecutorial background, who make up many of those on Connecticut's bench, according to a recent report.

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    Trump Prosecutor Blasts DQ Bid: 'Contrary To Democracy'

    Fulton County, Georgia, District Attorney Fani Willis delivered fiery testimony Thursday during a hearing seeking to have her office removed from the election interference case of Donald Trump and his allies, forcefully denying an improper relationship with a special prosecutor tapped for the high-profile case.

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    Ex-McElroy Deutsch CFO Charged With $1.5M Theft From Firm

    McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP's former chief financial officer has been hit with criminal charges in New Jersey state court alleging he embezzled more than $1.5 million from the firm over a five-year period in unauthorized compensation and company credit card charges for personal expenses, prosecutors said Thursday.

  • 1st Circ. Says Atty's Absence No Reason To Toss RICO Case

    The First Circuit has said a Boston federal judge's decision to dismiss a civil racketeering lawsuit after the plaintiff's counsel missed a hearing was an unwarranted rush to the "draconian sanction," which should be reserved for more extreme misconduct.

  • Vice Chancellor Sam Glasscock Retiring From Del. Chancery

    Delaware's Court of Chancery will lose its current longest-serving, and perhaps most folksy, jurist this year with the planned retirement of Vice Chancellor Sam Glasscock III from the court after nearly 25 years, Delaware's chief justice revealed today.

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    Trump Gets March 25 Trial Date In NY Hush Money Case

    The Manhattan district attorney's hush money case against Donald Trump is on track to be the first of the former president's four criminal matters to go to trial, after a state judge on Thursday denied his motion to dismiss the charges and confirmed a March 25 date for jury selection.

  • What's Left Of Judge Newman's DC Suit Likely Won't Go Far

    A D.C. federal judge may be allowing suspended U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman to pursue a handful of arguments over the constitutionality of the Judicial Conduct and Disability Act, but attorneys told Law360 they aren't convinced those claims will fare any better than those already dismissed by the court.

  • Tech Overhaul Tops Mich. Courts' Budget Priorities

    The Michigan Supreme Court's chief justice testified Wednesday that uniting all trial courts on the same case management system is a top priority and the biggest project on the court's plate as she asked legislators for more funding to support the rollout.  

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    Trump Prosecutor Asks Justices To Pass On Immunity Issue

    Special counsel Jack Smith urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday to reject former President Donald Trump's request for a stay of his federal election interference case, arguing that there's no merit to Trump's "radical claim" he is immune from prosecution, and that the public deserves a prompt verdict.

  • 'Rust' Armorer, Atty Responsible For Text Leak, Judge Rules

    A New Mexico judge declined Wednesday to dismiss the involuntary manslaughter case against "Rust" film weapons expert Hannah Gutierrez-Reed, finding that she and her attorney are to blame for a leak of their private cellphone communications.

  • Ex-Cognizant Execs Fight Co.'s Bid To Shield Bribe Evidence

    Two former Cognizant executives have called on a New Jersey federal court to reject the company's attempt to shield evidence related to a purported bribe as the executives face a criminal trial over a separate bribery scheme.

  • Conn. Justices Suspect Sleepy Juror Will Wake Up Murder Case

    The Connecticut Supreme Court was skeptical Wednesday of the state prosecutor's position that a judge was entirely blameless for apparently allowing a juror in a murder trial to sleep for more than an hour, and then letting the case proceed to a conviction after taking little action on the matter.

  • Bronx DA's Office Says Ex-Worker's FMLA Claim Is Invalid

    The Bronx District Attorney's office asked a New York federal judge to dismiss a former employee's suit accusing it of discrimination under the Family and Medical Leave Act and a racially driven promotion denial, arguing that she was unable to properly establish her claims.

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    Ex-Atty Can't Delay Prison Amid Pot Bribe Appeal, Judge Says

    A Boston federal judge on Wednesday shot down a former Massachusetts attorney's request to put off his 24-month prison sentence while appealing his conviction for bribing a local police chief to boost his client's retail cannabis application.

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    US Marshals Service Director Warns Of Threats To Judges

    The director of the U.S. Marshals Service told lawmakers on Wednesday that the current threat environment for federal judges is a "substantial risk to our democracy."

  • Florida Man Gets 3 Years For Damaging Federal Courthouse

    A man who admitted that he broke into the federal courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on Labor Day weekend 2022, smashing windows and causing water damage to the building, has been sentenced to three years in federal prison.

  • ABA Asks Agency To End Use Of 'Master,' Citing Slavery Tones

    Calling someone a "court-appointed master" carries negative connotations due to the term's use during slavery, the American Bar Association's president wrote in a letter urging the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts to adopt the term "court-appointed neutral" instead.

  • 'Rust' Armorer's Phone Snafu Shows Risks Of Texting Clients

    A legal dust-up over compromised text messages between a movie prop weapons expert and her lawyer in the "Rust" film shooting case raises questions about whether attorneys should text with clients and serves as a cautionary tale for prosecutors and the defense on the importance of protecting privileged communications, experts say.

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    AI-Generated Fake Case Law Leads To Sanctions In Wage Suit

    The owner of a Missouri-based technology business that was ordered to pay an ex-employee roughly $311,000 in unpaid wages, damages and legal costs was sanctioned Tuesday by an appellate court for briefing "deficiencies," including submitting fake cases generated by artificial intelligence.

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Expert Analysis

  • The Evolving Role Of The Law Firm Legal Secretary Author Photo

    Technological shifts during the pandemic and beyond should force firms to rethink how legal secretaries can not only better support timekeepers but also participate in elevating client service, bifurcating the role into an administrative support position and a more elevated practice support role, says Lauren Chung at HBR Consulting.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can I Ace My Upcoming Annual Review? Author Photo

    Jennifer Rakstad at White & Case highlights how associates can emphasize achievements and seek support before, during and after their annual review, despite the pandemic’s negative effects on face time with colleagues and business development opportunities.

  • How Your Law Firm's Brand Can Convey Prestige Author Photo

    In order to be perceived as prestigious by clients and potential recruits, law firms should take their branding efforts beyond designing visual identities and address six key imperatives to differentiate themselves — from identifying intangible core strengths to delivering on promises at every interaction, says Howard Breindel at DeSantis Breindel.

  • How Dynamic Project Management Can Help Law Firms Author Photo

    Law firms looking to streamline matter management should consider tools that offer both employees and clients real-time access to documents, action items, task assignee information and more, overcoming many of the limitations of project communications via email, says Stephen Weyer at Stites & Harbison.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can I Successfully Switch Practices? Author Photo

    Associates who pivot into new practice areas may find that along with the excitement of a fresh start comes some apprehension, but certain proactive steps can help tame anxiety and ensure attorneys successfully adapt to unfamiliar subjects, novel internal processes and different client deliverables, say Susan Berson and Hassan Shaikh at Mintz.

  • A Road Map For Creating Law Firm Sustainability Programs Author Photo

    Amid demands from clients and prospective hires for greater sustainability efforts, law firms should think beyond reusable mugs and create programs that incorporate clear leadership structures, emission tracking and reduction goals, and frameworks for reporting results, says Gayatri Joshi at the Law Firm Sustainability Network.

  • Why Firms Should Help Associates Do More Pro Bono Work Author Photo

    Associates may hesitate to take on the added commitment of pro bono matters, but such work has tangible skill-building benefits, so firms should consider compensation and leadership strategies to encourage participation, says Rasmeet Chahil at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Confronting The Stigma Of Alcohol Abuse In Legal Industry Author Photo

    The pandemic has likely exacerbated the prevalence of problem drinking in the legal profession, making it critical for lawyers and educators to address alcohol abuse and the associated stigma through issue-specific education, supportive assistance and alcohol-free professional events, says Erica Grigg at the Texas Lawyers' Assistance Program.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Have Duty To Push For Immigration Court Reform Author Photo

    Attorneys must use their collective voice to urge federal lawmakers to create an Article I immigration court outside executive branch control, helping address the conflicts of interest, political influence and lack of adjudication consistency that prevent migrants from achieving true justice, say Elia Diaz-Yaeger and Carlos Bollar at the Hispanic National Bar Association.

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    ​​​​​​​Ask A Mentor: How Can 1st-Year Attys Manage Remote Work? Author Photo

    First-year associates can have a hard time building relationships with colleagues, setting boundaries and prioritizing work-life balance in a remote work environment, so they must be sure to lean on their firms' support systems and practice good time management, say Jenny Lee and Christopher Fernandez at Kirkland.

  • 5 Ways To Lead Lawyer Teams Toward Better Mental Health Author Photo

    Attorney team leaders have a duty to attend to the mental well-being of their subordinates with intention, thought and candor — starting with ensuring their own mental health is in order, says Liam Montgomery at Williams & Connolly.

  • How Your Summer Associate Events Can Convey Inclusivity Author Photo

    As law firms begin planning next year's summer associate events, they should carefully examine how choice of venue, activity, theme, attendees and formality can create feelings of exclusion for minority associates, and consider changing the status quo to create multiculturally inclusive events, says Sharon Jones at Jones Diversity.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Do I Negotiate Long-Term Flex Work? Author Photo

    Though the pandemic has shown the value of remote work, many firms are still reluctant to embrace flexible working arrangements when offices reopen, so attorneys should use several negotiating tactics to secure a long-term remote or hybrid work setup that also protects their potential for career advancement, says Elaine Spector at Harrity & Harrity.

  • What I Wish Law Schools Taught Women About Legal Careers Author Photo

    Instead of spending an entire semester on 19th century hunting rights, I wish law schools would facilitate honest discussions about what it’s like to navigate life as an attorney, woman and mother, and offer lessons on business marketing that transcend golf outings and social mixers, says Daphne Delvaux at Gruenberg Law.

  • 4 Ways To Break Down Barriers For Women Of Color In Law Author Photo

    Female lawyers belonging to minority groups continue to be paid less and promoted less than their male counterparts, so law firms and corporate legal departments must stop treating women as a monolithic group and create initiatives that address the unique barriers women of color face, say Daphne Turpin Forbes at Microsoft and Linda Chanow at the Institute for Inclusion in the Legal Profession.

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