Courts

  • FCRA Immunity Waiver Ruling Tees Up Compliance Frenzy

    A U.S. Supreme Court ruling that the Fair Credit Reporting Act waives federal agencies' immunity from lawsuits will not only open the door to more litigation against government lenders but may also trigger housecleaning to ensure that debts are correctly reported, experts told Law360.

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    The Supreme Court's Week: By The Numbers

    The U.S. Supreme Court issued two rulings this week, but both were overshadowed by the week's only oral argument, over whether or not former President Donald Trump is eligible to appear on the 2024 presidential ballot. Here, Law360 Pulse takes a data-driven dive into the week that was at the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • NY Appeals Court OKs Court System's Vax Exemption Denial

    A New York appeals court tossed a lawsuit that challenged the state court system's denial of more than two dozen religious exemption applications related to a COVID-19 vaccination mandate, stating Thursday that the state agency's "blind review" of the application procedure was aboveboard and fair.

  • NJ Courts Reject Liability In Ex-Judge's Harassment Suit

    The New Jersey Administrative Office of the Courts asked a state court to remove it as a defendant from a municipal court administrator's sexual harassment suit against a former municipal judge, saying the parties were not employees of the AOC.

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    Inquiry Of Georgia DA No 'Witch Hunt,' State Committee Says

    The chairman of a Georgia Senate special committee investigating the district attorney overseeing the election interference case against former President Donald Trump said during the committee's first meeting Friday that the investigation would be a "quest for the truth," not a "political witch hunt."

  • NY Panel Rejects NYCLU Demand For Memos To State Judges

    A New York state appellate court said the state's court system is not bound to comply with a request by the New York Civil Liberties Union to disclose internal documents interpreting federal and state law that were sent to judges over the course of more than a decade.

  • Feds Seek Over 5 Years For NYC Atty In $18.8M Ponzi Scheme

    Federal prosecutors are seeking 5¼ to 6½ years in prison for a New York City attorney who admitted to running an $18.8 million Ponzi scheme that defrauded real estate investors, in addition to separately laundering funds from an expansive insurance fraud scheme.

  • Voir Dire: Law360 Pulse's Weekly Quiz

    This was another busy week for the legal industry as BigLaw expanded its reach and big names made headlines after court. Test your legal news savvy here with Law360 Pulse’s weekly quiz.

  • Feds Ask High Court To Block 'Ghost Gun' Exemption

    The federal government is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to step in and block an injunction exempting two companies that sell so-called ghost guns, which lack serial numbers, from a rule classifying the kits as firearms, saying the Fifth Circuit's current ruling creates a loophole that will result in a "flood" of untraceable weapons in the country.

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    Krieger Kim & Lewin Reshuffle As Name Partner Rejoins SDNY

    Krieger Kim & Lewin LLP is changing its name and taking on a new partner as one of the former federal prosecutors who founded the boutique rejoins the U.S. Attorney's Office in the Southern District of New York, the firm announced Friday.  

  • Ex-Trump Aide Peter Navarro Can't Stay Free During Appeal

    A District of Columbia federal judge on Thursday refused to allow former White House adviser Peter Navarro to remain outside of prison while he appeals his sentence for refusing to comply with congressional subpoenas, rejecting Navarro's argument that his appeal raises a "substantial question of law" warranting his release.

  • 5 Key Takeaways From Justices' Trump DQ Arguments

    A special U.S. Supreme Court session Thursday examining Colorado's removal of former President Donald Trump from its primary ballot was dominated by debate over a state's authority to do so, but the justices also found time to examine Reconstruction-era language choices and weigh the benefits of relying on ancient case law — while mostly avoiding the question of Trump's participation in an insurrection.

  • Ga. Judicial Watchdog Wants Probate Judge Ousted

    The long-running trial of a Georgia probate judge accused of violating the state's Code of Judicial Conduct on social media and jailing a woman seeking to amend her marriage record wrapped Thursday, with the head of the state's judicial watchdog arguing she should be removed from the bench.

  • Baltimore Judge To Face Hearing Over Claims He Groped Atty

    A Baltimore city district court judge is set to face a judicial ethics hearing in May over allegations that he repeatedly touched a lawyer without her consent following a bar association event, while he apologized for making the woman uncomfortable and said he genuinely thought she had been flirting with him.

  • 11th Circ. Says Ex-USF Law Prof. Can't Sue Without A Lawyer

    The Eleventh Circuit upheld on Thursday a lower court's order barring a former University of South Florida law professor from filing additional cases against her former employer without another attorney's signature, finding nothing wrong with the district court controlling its docket in the face of her repeated lawsuits.

  • 1st Amendment Limited In Court, Prosecutor Tells 6th Circ.

    The First Amendment "is not without limit in a courtroom setting," says a Michigan county prosecutor who is trying to convince the Sixth Circuit not to disturb a ruling that upholds the state's prohibition on recording livestreaming court proceedings.

  • Doctor In NBA Fraud Case Can Ditch Atty Over Plea Squabble

    A Seattle physician accused of taking part in a healthcare fraud scheme orchestrated by former NBA players may drop his court-appointed attorney and represent himself in the New York criminal trial, a federal judge in Manhattan ordered, approving the move after the doctor claimed the lawyer refused to withdraw his guilty plea.

  • Judicial Nominee Assures GOP Sens. She's Not A Marxist

    Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee raised concerns about two U.S. district court nominees appearing before the committee on Thursday over their supposed ties to Marxism and the defund the police campaign, but the nominees tried to disabuse lawmakers of that suggestion.

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    NJ Superior Court Hopefuls Greenlighted By Senate Panel

    The New Jersey Senate's Judiciary Committee on Thursday advanced three nominees for the short-staffed state Superior Court who have served in local government and approved the formal nomination of Essex County's acting prosecutor of six years.

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    Ex-NJ Judge Suspended From Law Practice Over Groping

    The New Jersey Supreme Court handed down a one-year suspension from practicing law to a former North Bergen municipal court judge who was previously permanently barred from being a judge for groping a woman and being dishonest about the incident in the judicial ethics case against him.

  • Ga. DA Moves To Quash Trump Co-Defendant Subpoenas

    Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis has moved to quash subpoenas that would require her, members of her staff and the attorney who represented special prosecutor Nathan Wade in his divorce to testify during a hearing on whether she should be disqualified from prosecuting the Georgia election interference case.

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    Justices Doubtful Of States' Power To DQ Trump

    U.S. Supreme Court justices were deeply skeptical Thursday that states have the authority to bar Donald Trump from the ballot under the 14th Amendment, repeatedly questioning why Colorado should be allowed to potentially decide the course of the 2024 presidential election.

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    High Court Sides With Whistleblower Against UBS

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday found that whistleblowers don't need to show retaliatory intent on the part of their employers in order to be protected under federal law, in a unanimous ruling in favor of a former UBS employee and whistleblower who fought to restore a $900,000 jury verdict he secured in 2017.

  • Justices Rule Gov't Agencies Not Immune From FCRA Suits

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a person can sue a government agency under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, because the law's 1970 definition of a "person" was sufficient to waive the government's immunity.

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    Judge Newman's Options Dwindle After Suspension Is Upheld

    Following Wednesday's decision by the national panel that reviews judicial misconduct cases upholding Federal Circuit Judge Pauline Newman's suspension, she faces a difficult path to getting reinstated without complying with an investigation into her mental fitness, experts say.

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Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    We Need More Professional Diversity In The Federal Judiciary Author Photo

    With the current overrepresentation of former corporate lawyers on the federal bench, the Biden administration must prioritize professional diversity in judicial nominations and consider lawyers who have represented workers, consumers and patients, says Navan Ward, president of the American Association for Justice.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Do I Retire Without Creating Chaos? Author Photo

    Retired attorney Vernon Winters explains how lawyers can thoughtfully transition into retirement while protecting their firms’ interests and allaying clients' fears, with varying approaches that turn on the nature of one's practice, client relationships and law firm management.

  • Why I Went From Litigator To Law Firm Diversity Officer Author Photo

    Narges Kakalia at Mintz recounts her journey from litigation partner to director of diversity, equity and inclusion at the firm, explaining how the challenges she faced as a female lawyer of color shaped her transition and why attorneys’ unique skill sets make them well suited for diversity leadership roles.

  • For Asian American Lawyers, Good Mentorship Is Crucial Author Photo

    Navigating the legal world as an Asian American lawyer comes with unique challenges — from cultural stereotypes to a perceived lack of leadership skills — but finding good mentors and treating mentorship as a two-way street can help junior lawyers overcome some of the hurdles and excel, say attorneys at Paul Weiss.

  • Coping With Secondary Trauma From Pro Bono Work Author Photo

    As the need for pro bono services continues to grow in tandem with the pandemic, attorneys should assess their mental well-being and look for symptoms of secondary traumatic stress, while law firms must carefully manage their public service programs and provide robust mental health services to employees, says William Silverman at Proskauer.

  • How Firms Can Benefit From Creating Their Own ALSPs Author Photo

    As more law firms develop their own legal services centers to serve as both a source of flexible personnel and technological innovation, they can further enhance the effectiveness by fostering a consistent and cohesive team and allowing for experimentation with new technologies from an established baseline, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Modernizing Legal Education Through Hybrid JD Programs Author Photo

    Amid pandemic-era shifts in education, law schools and other stakeholders should consider the wide geographic and demographic reach of Juris Doctor programs with both online and in-person learning options, and educators should think through the various ways hybrid programs can be structured, says Stephen Burnett at All Campus.

  • How BigLaw Can Mirror Small Firm Attorney Engagement Author Photo

    BigLaw has the unique opportunity to hit refresh post-pandemic and enhance attorney satisfaction by adopting practices that smaller firms naturally employ — including work assignment policies that can provide junior attorneys steady professional development, says Michelle Genet Bernstein at Mark Migdal.

  • Ditch The Annual Review To Boost Attorney Job Satisfaction Author Photo

    In order to attract and retain the rising millennial generation's star talent, law firms should break free of the annual review system and train lawyers of all seniority levels to solicit and share frequent and informal feedback, says Betsy Miller at Cohen Milstein.

  • How Attorneys Can Narrow LGBTQ Gap In The Judiciary Author Photo

    Lawyers can take several steps to redress the lack of adequate LGBTQ representation on the bench and its devastating impact on litigants and counsel in the community, says Janice Grubin, co-chair of the Judiciary Committee at the LGBT Bar Association of Greater New York.

  • Employers Must Heed Rising Attorney Stress And Alcohol Use Author Photo

    Krill Strategies’ Patrick Krill, who co-authored a new study that revealed alarming levels of stress, hazardous drinking and associated gender disparities among practicing attorneys, highlights how legal employers can confront the underlying risk factors as both warnings and opportunities in the post-COVID-19 era.

  • Lawyers Can Get Ready For Space Law To Take Flight Author Photo

    While international agreements for space law have remained relatively unchanged since their creation decades ago, the rapid pace of change in U.S. laws and policies is creating opportunities for both new and veteran lawyers looking to break into this exciting realm, in either the private sector or government, says Michael Dodge at the University of North Dakota.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: What Makes A Successful Summer Associate? Author Photo

    Navigating a few densely packed weeks at a law firm can be daunting for summer associates, but those who are prepared to seize opportunities and not afraid to ask questions will be set up for success, says Julie Crisp at Latham.

  • How To Successfully Market Your Summer Associate Program Author Photo

    Law firms can attract the right summer associate candidates and help students see what makes a program unique by using carefully crafted messaging and choosing the best ambassadors to deliver it, says Tamara McClatchey, director of career services at the University of Chicago Law School.

  • Opinion

    Judges Deserve Congress' Commitment To Their Safety Author Photo

    Following the tragic attack on U.S. District Judge Esther Salas' family last summer and amid rising threats against the judiciary, legislation protecting federal judges' personal information and enhancing security measures at courthouses is urgently needed, says U.S. District Judge Roslynn Mauskopf, director of the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts.

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