More Real Estate Coverage

  • January 25, 2024

    Wash. Justices Spare Homeowners From Lakeshore Eviction

    The Washington State Supreme Court on Thursday said a group of homeowners are the legal owners of shoreline where they built boat docks and decks, rejecting a county government's argument that it controlled the lakeshore linked to a county recreational trail under a 19th-century federal railroad right-of-way law.

  • January 25, 2024

    DC Circ. Unsure About Wading Into PR Bay Dredging Fight

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers faced off against several environmental groups at the D.C. Circuit Thursday over a dredge project that would widen Puerto Rico's largest port, but the panel seemed more concerned about whether it had the jurisdiction to hear the appeal at all.

  • January 25, 2024

    FERC Won't Halt Work On Texas LNG Export Terminal

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has said it won't pause authorized construction on a liquefied natural gas export terminal on the South Texas Gulf Coast, a decision a dissenting commissioner said perpetuates and magnifies injuries to environmental justice communities and ignores evidence of harm to public health and the environment.

  • January 25, 2024

    States, Industry Back Feds' Land Swap Fight At 9th Circ.

    The states of Idaho and Utah, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Mining Association have joined the federal government in urging the Ninth Circuit to overturn a lower court ruling in favor of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes' challenge to a land transfer intended for the expansion of a fertilizer plant.

  • January 25, 2024

    Lender Aided $8M Kuwaiti Royal Rip-Off, Judge Finds

    A Maryland federal judge ordered a lender to pay at least $469,990 after finding the company helped further a Baltimore restaurant owner's scheme that bilked $7.8 million from a member of the Kuwaiti royal family.

  • January 24, 2024

    Investors Urge NY Court To Restore RMBS Fraud Claim

    A group of investors in a residential mortgage-backed securities entity asked a New York state appeals court Wednesday to hold one of the project officers liable for concealing negative information about its prospects.

  • January 24, 2024

    Bid To Swap Chevron For An Old Standby Raises Doubts

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court debated whether a World War II-era doctrine encouraging courts to strongly consider agency statutory interpretations could replace the court's controversial so-called Chevron doctrine that requires judges to defer to those interpretations if a statute is ambiguous.

  • January 24, 2024

    Iowa Senate Bill Seeks Tax Break For Moveable Structures

    Iowa would prohibit moveable structures that aren't connected to gas, electricity or other utilities and meet other requirements from being assessed and taxed as real property under a bill introduced in the state Senate.

  • January 24, 2024

    Mohawk Council Wants To Withdraw From 1796 Land Dispute

    The Mohawk Nation Council of Chiefs says a recent decision to withdraw from a land settlement agreement with the state of New York over a decadeslong lawsuit involving more than 2,000 acres of illegally purchased land was not easy but was made in the interest of protecting the territorial integrity of the Mohawk Nation.

  • January 23, 2024

    PacifiCorp Owes At Least $62M To 9 Homeowners Hit By Fires

    PacifiCorp must pay at least $62 million in compensatory damages to nine people who fled their homes in a Labor Day 2020 fire outbreak, a Portland, Oregon, jury found Tuesday, with parties confirming the amount could be much higher with the expected addition of punitive damages.

  • January 23, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Ch. 11 Preference Claims Can Be Sold, 5th Circ. Says

    The Fifth Circuit ruled Tuesday that interest in Chapter 11 preference actions, which seek to claw back payments a debtor made to creditors prior to bankruptcy, can be sold as "property of the estate," weighing in on the issue for the first time.

  • January 23, 2024

    Court Will Rethink Tribes' Claims In Railroad Dispute

    An Idaho federal judge has reinstated two Quiet Title Act claims the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation lodged against the federal government in a dispute over land once used by a railway, agreeing that a Supreme Court ruling requires the reversal of a prior order dismissing the claims.

  • January 22, 2024

    PacifiCorp Should Pay $45M To 9 Wildfire Victims, Jury Hears

    Nine people who fled their homes during a Labor Day 2020 wildfire outbreak each deserve at least $5 million from the owner of Pacific Power, their lawyers told a Portland, Oregon, jury in closing arguments Monday, while the company said reasonable numbers would be much lower.

  • January 22, 2024

    Iowa County's CO2 Pipeline Rules Are Preempted, Judge Told

    The developer of a proposed interstate carbon dioxide pipeline has told a federal judge that rules restricting its project passed last week in Palo Alto County, Iowa, are preempted by federal law, as the company pointed to a ruling last month blocking two other local ordinances.

  • January 22, 2024

    World Cup Workers' Abuse Claims Are Misdirected, US Co. Says

    Filipino laborers who claimed they were subjected to abusive work and living conditions while helping build facilities for the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar aimed their ire in the wrong direction, a U.S. construction company told a Colorado federal judge in a bid to dismiss the suit.

  • January 22, 2024

    Feds Defend Ability To Take Land Into Trust For Alaska Tribes

    The U.S. government is urging an Alaska federal judge to reject the state of Alaska's arguments that the Interior Department's decision to take a 787-square-foot piece of land in downtown Juneau in trust for the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes oversteps its authority or threatens state jurisdiction.

  • January 22, 2024

    Holland & Knight Brings On Greenspoon Public Finance Pros

    A pair of former Greenspoon Marder LLP public finance attorneys who both have about four decades of experience in their practice area have jumped to Holland & Knight LLP, the firm announced Monday.

  • January 19, 2024

    Law360 Names Firms Of The Year

    Eight law firms have earned spots as Law360's Firms of the Year, with 55 Practice Group of the Year awards among them, steering some of the largest deals of 2023 and securing high-profile litigation wins, including at the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • January 19, 2024

    Law360 Names Practice Groups Of The Year

    Law360 would like to congratulate the winners of its Practice Groups of the Year awards for 2023, which honor the attorney teams behind litigation wins and major deals that resonated throughout the legal industry this past year.

  • January 19, 2024

    Property Plays: Thorofare, Greystone, Brennan

    Thorofare Capital has loaned $26 million for a San Diego multifamily property, Greystone has provided $40.3 million for a multifamily property in Indiana and Brennan Investment Group has picked up a 263,000-square-foot Cincinnati industrial building.

  • January 19, 2024

    Insurer Says Wash. Judge Must Alter COVID Coverage Ruling

    A Liberty Mutual unit asked a Washington state judge to alter his ruling of this month that the University of Washington established a plausible claim to recover losses from the COVID-19 pandemic, arguing that the decision ignores key differences among the university's policies. 

  • January 19, 2024

    Army Corps Escapes Ohio River Tugboat Service Suit

    An Ohio federal judge has let the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers out of a construction and asphalt company's suit over an allegedly unauthorized tugboat service on the Ohio River, writing in his opinion that the Corps is not properly a defendant just for owning the land the service is using.

  • January 18, 2024

    Biz, Insurer Settle $10.5M Military School Construction Dispute

    A contractor and its insurer have settled a $10.5 million lawsuit seeking coverage for shoddy construction work on a school on a military base, according to a joint statement Thursday in Maryland federal court.

  • January 18, 2024

    Va. Landlord Charged With Preying On Low-Income Minorities

    A Virginia grand jury has indicted a Hampton-based landlord for an alleged scheme to rake in government housing-assistance payments by exploiting vulnerable African American tenants whom he threatened to evict for late payments using violence and racist remarks.

  • January 18, 2024

    DC Judge Won't DQ Atty In Construction Co. Firing Spat

    A D.C. federal judge has declined to disqualify an attorney from representing a construction company in an employment dispute between the company's two co-founders, finding that the lawyer ceased representing one of the co-founders prior to her retention by the construction firm and therefore no conflict existed.

Expert Analysis

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • ESG Around The World: South Korea

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    Numerous ESG trends have materialized in South Korea in the past three years, with impacts ranging from greenwashing prevention and carbon neutrality measures to workplace harassment and board diversity initiatives, say Chang Wook Min and Hyun Chan Jung at Jipyong.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • AI Isn't The Wild West, So Prepare Now For Bias Risks

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    In addition to President Joe Biden's recent historic executive order on safe, secure and trustworthy artificial intelligence, there are existing federal and state laws prohibiting fraud, defamation and even discrimination, so companies considering using or developing AI should take steps to minimize legal and business risks, says civil rights attorney Farhana Khera.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 1st Tax Easement Convictions Will Likely Embolden DOJ, IRS

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    After recent convictions in the first criminal tax fraud trial over allegedly abusive syndicated conservation easements, the IRS and U.S. Department of Justice will likely pursue other promoters for similar alleged conspiracies — though one acquittal may help attorneys better evaluate their clients' exposure, say Bill Curtis and Lauren DeSantis-Then at Polsinelli.

  • ESG Around The World: The UK

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    Following Brexit, the U.K. has adopted a different approach to regulating environmental, social and governance factors from the European Union — an approach that focuses on climate disclosures by U.K.-regulated entities, while steering clear of the more ambitious objectives pursued by the EU, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Rebuilding The Construction Industry With AI

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    Artificial intelligence in the construction industry will usher in a new era of innovation and efficiency, leading to cheaper, safer and more environmentally conscious building practices, but it will also bring concerns related to data security, workforce training and job displacement, say Josephine Bahn and Jeffery Mullen at Cozen O'Connor.

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