More Real Estate Coverage

  • December 18, 2023

    Kentucky Urges 6th Circ. To Revive WOTUS Suit

    Kentucky on Monday urged the Sixth Circuit to revive its lawsuit challenging the federal government's controversial rule defining its jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act.

  • December 18, 2023

    Alaska LNG Enviro Review Still Lacking, DC Circ. Told

    The U.S. Department of Energy continues to unlawfully discount the climate change harms associated with a $43 billion liquefied natural gas project in Alaska despite performing a supplemental environmental review, environmental groups told the D.C. Circuit.

  • December 18, 2023

    Oil Co. Defends Appeal In Fraud Suit Against Pittsburgh Firm

    An oil and gas producer alleging it was defrauded by a Pittsburgh-based law firm in a land purchase deal defended its appeal to the Third Circuit, asking the court to reinstate its fraud litigation against Tucker Arensberg after the case was dismissed as time-barred.

  • December 15, 2023

    Parties Want To Revisit Ore. Dam Review In 5 Years

    The states of Oregon and Washington, as well as a coalition of green groups and Native American tribes, have entered into a joint agreement with the federal government to pause their lawsuit over hydropower practices on the Columbia River until 2029, as the parties begin restoring salmon habitats.

  • December 15, 2023

    Tulsa Can't Prosecute Crimes In Indian Country, Judge Says

    The city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, lacks jurisdiction to prosecute Native Americans for municipal crimes committed on reservation lands, a federal court judge determined Friday, saying an appellate court mandate that dismissed an early 19th-century law governing judicial authority over Indian Country will remain in effect.

  • December 15, 2023

    Property Plays: Hines, MG Properties, Prudential

    Hines plans to build a Dallas residential tower, MG Properties has paid $76 million for a Denver multifamily property and Prudential Financial has loaned $75 million for an Illinois apartment building.

  • December 14, 2023

    Seattle Woman Drops Trafficking Suit Against Red Roof

    A woman who says she was trafficked in a Seattle Red Roof Inn voluntarily dropped her case against the hotel company Thursday.

  • December 13, 2023

    NY Thruway Uses Cayuga Land Without Permission, Suit Says

    The Cayuga Nation has filed suit against New York State seeking a cut of the tolls collected on the New York State Thruway where it passes through the 64,000-acre reservation promised to the nation in a 1794 treaty.

  • December 13, 2023

    SG Urges High Court To Back 5th Circ. In Texas Takings Case

    U.S. Solicitor General Elizabeth Prelogar filed an amicus brief in a U.S. Supreme Court takings dispute related to traffic barriers along a Texas highway, urging the high court to uphold the Fifth Circuit's ruling that the takings clause of the Fifth Amendment does not itself supply a cause of action for monetary relief against a state. 

  • December 13, 2023

    Justices Urged To Review $26M Easement Deduction Tax Row

    A partnership asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear its bid to keep a $26.5 million deduction for a land conservation easement, saying the case was not barred by a law that prohibits suits to restrain the collection of taxes.

  • December 12, 2023

    Fishing Groups Seek 1st Circ.'s Take On Vineyard Wind Farm

    Commercial fishing groups are asking the First Circuit to undo a Massachusetts federal judge's ruling nixing their challenge of U.S. Department of the Interior approvals for the Vineyard Wind 1 project, and to block development of the offshore wind farm before it causes more harm to their livelihoods and the environment.

  • December 12, 2023

    NY Bills Could Cut Private Universities' Tax Breaks

    New York would pare tax breaks granted to private universities by repealing exemptions for real and personal property tax exemption as well as taking away tax-exempt status for institutions, under two bills introduced in the state Senate.

  • December 12, 2023

    Real Estate Rumors: Affinius Capital, Relevant Group, Adler

    Affinius Capital and Simmons Bank have reportedly loaned $85.1 million for an Arizona multifamily property, Relevant Group is said to have sold a Los Angeles hotel for $12 million, and Adler Real Estate Partners is said to have sold three Maryland properties for $4.2 million.

  • December 12, 2023

    Quarles & Brady Taps New Leaders For 3 Practice Groups

    Quarles & Brady LLP has named new leaders for its health and life sciences, real estate, and product liability practice groups after two prior leaders joined the firm's executive committee and another stepped back from his leadership role.

  • December 12, 2023

    FBI Says Site Selection Over New HQ Still On Shaky Ground

    FBI and General Services Administration officials continued to disagree Tuesday on whether there was impropriety with the selection process that resulted in Greenbelt, Maryland, being chosen for the new, consolidated FBI headquarters location. 

  • December 12, 2023

    Sprinkler Co. Inks Deal To End $1.1M Water Damage Suit

    An insurer settled its Washington federal court case against a Michigan-based fire prevention company after blaming the company's sprinkler for causing over $1.1 million in water damage to a Seattle apartment building when it drenched the place without cause.

  • December 11, 2023

    Tulsa Looks To Ax Tribe's Indian Country Jurisdiction Dispute

    Tulsa city officials are asking an Oklahoma federal district court to dismiss claims by the Muscogee (Creek) Nation that allege Native Americans are being unlawfully prosecuted, saying the law regarding jurisdiction over Indian Country is "unsettled, continually evolving and the subject of several pending lawsuits in both state and federal courts."

  • December 11, 2023

    Conn. Justices Ponder Borough's News Habits In Notice Case

    The Connecticut Supreme Court searched Monday for a legal notice standard that works for the 21st century as it considered a challenge to a real estate regulation, pointing to modern news consumption habits as a reason to wonder if newspapers are the best platform for disseminating such notices.

  • December 11, 2023

    Ga. Appeals OKs Retrial After Juror Removal In Forgery Case

    The Georgia Court of Appeals on Monday overturned the conviction of and ordered a new trial for a woman found guilty of lying and forging documents to obtain the property of her deceased boyfriend, saying a trial court wrongly replaced a juror after deliberations at her trial began.

  • December 11, 2023

    Justices Won't Wade Into Fight Over Texas Grid Law

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to review the Fifth Circuit's ruling that a Texas law giving incumbent transmission companies the first chance to build new power lines is unconstitutional.

  • December 08, 2023

    Albertsons Wants Off The Hook For Amazon Reno Costs

    Albertsons is looking to force Amazon to disclose how $700,000 was spent on improving a California retail space leased to the e-commerce giant, as part of an underlying lawsuit filed by the property's landlord accusing former tenant Albertsons of owing millions for rebuilding the space to Amazon's specifications.

  • December 08, 2023

    Property Plays: Willets Point, Countryside Plaza, Quilvest

    Property Plays is a weekly roundup of the latest loans, leases, sales and projects around the country. Send your tips — all confidential — to realestate@law360.com.

  • December 08, 2023

    Enviro Orgs. To Drop Suit Over Axed Lithium Exploration

    The Center for Biological Diversity and Amargosa Conservancy are moving to dismiss their paused suit challenging a temporarily axed lithium exploration project near the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in southeast Nevada, saying they've struck an agreement with federal agencies to settle the case.

  • December 08, 2023

    Gunster Lands GrayRobinson Father-Son Real Estate Duo

    Florida business law firm Gunster has brought on a father-son real estate attorney duo from GrayRobinson PA in Tampa.

  • December 08, 2023

    Insurer Can't Keep Info Secret In Ga. Church Fire Damage Suit

    A Georgia federal judge shot down an insurance company's bid Friday to keep certain information confidential in a dispute over fire damage suffered by a Conyers, Georgia, church in 2022.

Expert Analysis

  • Biden's Enviro Justice Focus Brings New Business Risks

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    A recent executive order from President Joe Biden continues the administration's whole-of-government approach toward environmental justice, and its focus on transparency may increase the risk of permit challenges, enforcement actions and citizen suits, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Attorneys Should Have An Ethical Duty To Advance DEI

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    National and state bar associations are encouraging attorneys to apply diversity, equity and inclusion practices in the legal profession and beyond, and these associations should take it one step further by formally recognizing ethical duties for attorneys to promote DEI, which could better the legal profession and society, says Elena Mitchell at Moore & Van Allen.

  • EV Chargers Can Bring Benefits For Calif. Property Owners

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    California property developers and owners face growing pressure to provide electric vehicle charging infrastructure — but this can be a unique opportunity to add value to real estate assets, and can be accomplished in multiple ways, say Riley Cutner-Orrantia and Eurie Hwang at Crosbie Gliner.

  • Brownfield Renewables Guidance Leaves Site Eligibility Murky

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    Recent IRS guidance sheds some light on the Inflation Reduction Act's incentives for renewable energy development on contaminated sites — but the eligibility of certain sites for brownfield status remains uncertain, say Megan Caldwell and Jon Micah Goeller at Husch Blackwell.

  • Water Infrastructure Crisis Requires Private Investment

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    The federal government is in the process of distributing billions of dollars recently allocated for upgrades to U.S. water infrastructure — but capital, beyond what government can provide, is needed to fully address decades of neglect, meaning that private investment must be a part of the solution, says Damian Georgino at Womble Bond.

  • Ambiguity In 'Buy America' Implementation May Slow Projects

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    The White House Office of Management and Budget's most recent guidance, which builds on a complex patchwork of Buy America restrictions that vary by federal agency, would perpetuate government contractors' uncertainty regarding product and material classification and could delay infrastructure projects, say attorneys at Miles & Stockbridge.

  • La. Suit Could Set New Enviro Justice Litigation Paradigm

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    Inclusive Louisiana v. St. James Parish, a lawsuit filed recently in Louisiana federal court that makes wide-ranging and novel constitutional and statutory claims of environmental racism based on centuries of local history, could become a new template for environmental justice litigation against governments and businesses, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • It's Time For Lawyers To Stand Up For Climate Justice

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    The anniversary this week of the Deepwater Horizon disaster offers an opportunity for attorneys to embrace the practice of just transition lawyering — leveraging our skills to support communities on the front lines of climate change and environmental catastrophe as they pursue rebuilding and transformation, says Amy Laura Cahn at Taproot Earth.

  • Without Stronger Due Diligence, Attys Risk AML Regulation

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    Amid increasing pressure to mitigate money laundering and terrorism financing risks in gatekeeper professions, the legal industry will need to clarify and strengthen existing client due diligence measures — or risk the federal regulation attorneys have long sought to avoid, says Jeremy Glicksman at the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office.

  • The Legal Consequences Of High PFAS Background Levels

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    As federal and state regulations around per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances proliferate, emerging scientific literature is showing that PFAS exist in many environments at background levels that exceed regulatory limits — and the potential legal implications are profound, say Grant Gilezan and Paul Stewart at Dykema and Dylan Eberle at Geosyntec Consultants.

  • Building On Successful Judicial Assignment Reform In Texas

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    Prompt action by the Judicial Conference could curtail judge shopping and improve the efficiency and procedural fairness of the federal courts by implementing random districtwide assignment of cases, which has recently proven successful in Texas patent litigation, says Dabney Carr at Troutman Pepper.

  • IRS Green Energy Tax Credit Notice Provides Needed Clarity

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    Recent IRS guidance clarifying how the government will determine energy community locations for purposes of bonus clean energy tax credits should help resolve risk allocation disagreements among financing parties and parties to merger and acquisition transactions, say Casey August and Paul Gordon at Morgan Lewis.

  • How State Laws Are Taking On Clean Energy Project Protests

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    By enacting legislation that streamlines siting and permitting for large-scale renewable energy infrastructure projects, states like Illinois, New York and California are keeping approval processes out of the reach of "not in my backyard" opponents and increasing the probability of meeting ambitious climate goals, says Bo Mahr at Husch Blackwell.

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