Real Estate

  • February 27, 2024

    La. Comfort Inn Owner Ordered To Arbitrate $2.6M Storm Suit

    A Louisiana federal judge has ordered the owner of a Comfort Inn outside New Orleans to arbitrate a $2.6 million suit against its insurer over coverage for damage from Hurricane Ida, saying its insurance policy compels arbitration.

  • February 27, 2024

    Chinese Real Estate Giant KE Holdings Gets IPO Suit Trimmed

    A New York federal judge tossed a swath of claims against Chinese real estate giant KE Holdings and its executives in an investor suit claiming they overstated the number of agents and stores on its platform, which a short seller later said was false, leading the stock price to drop.

  • February 27, 2024

    Commanders Unveil Stadium Upgrades Amid Possible Move

    The Washington Commanders on Tuesday announced a total of $75 million in upgrades to its current home stadium that includes new premium seating and a new sound system, amid a battle to determine where the NFL team will play in the future.

  • February 27, 2024

    Attys Get Personal In Mich. Foreclosure Default Fight

    Counsel traded jabs Monday over Michigan counties' tax foreclosure practices, with a lawyer for county treasurers claiming the other side took advantage of a family medical situation to launch a default judgment bid and a plaintiffs' attorney saying the case had ruined his friendship with the other lawyer.

  • February 27, 2024

    Md. Panel OKs Municipal Local Property Tax Credit Bill

    Maryland would allow the governing body of a municipality to award property tax credits for three property situations, the amount of which could be decided by the municipality, under a bill passed Tuesday by the state House Ways and Means Committee.

  • February 27, 2024

    Macy's To Cut Stores, Focus On Luxury Amid Proxy Fight

    Macy's announced a plan Tuesday to close 150 stores, add new luxury-focused locations and monetize at least $600 million worth of its assets as it faces a proxy fight from activist investors that offered $5.8 billion for the company last month.

  • February 27, 2024

    States, Businesses Aim To Kill Feds' Revised Water Rule

    States and business groups have asked a North Dakota federal judge to force the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to revise regulations intended to define the scope of the federal government's authority under the Clean Water Act.

  • February 27, 2024

    Conn. Mortgage Biz Rips 'Maximalist' CFPB Licensing Stance

    Shuttered East Hartford mortgage company 1st Alliance Lending LLC and its co-owners have argued a Connecticut federal court should throw out the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's claims that they deceived borrowers by letting unlicensed consultants create and manage their loans, asserting that the agency's "maximalist position" goes beyond the law.

  • February 27, 2024

    Philly Gun Shop Ban Doesn't Flout 2nd Amendment

    Philadelphia's zoning code barring gun shops close to residential neighborhoods didn't violate a shooting range's Second Amendment rights, because the location of a shop isn't part of the fundamental rights covered by the amendment, a Pennsylvania appellate court ruled Tuesday.

  • February 27, 2024

    Chicago Board Will Appeal Transfer Tax Referendum Decision

    The Chicago Board of Election Commissioners will appeal a Cook County Circuit Court decision that barred the city from counting any votes cast in the real estate transfer tax referendum in the March 19 primary election, the board announced Tuesday.

  • February 27, 2024

    Energy Co. Asks 8th Circ. To Revive Lease Termination Suit

    A Denver-based energy company has told the Eighth Circuit that a North Dakota federal judge was wrong to dismiss its lease termination suit and hold that it had not exhausted its administrative remedies when its appeal of the Bureau of Indian Affairs decision had dragged on for nine-plus years.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ore. City Urges High Court To Revive Homeless Camp Ban

    An Oregon city urged the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a Ninth Circuit ruling that its ban on camping in public spaces violated homeless residents' Eighth Amendment rights, arguing that the court's ruling impermissibly immunizes some conduct from all punishment.

  • February 27, 2024

    Law Firm Leasing Activity Reaches Pre-Pandemic Level

    Major firm relocations in late 2023, including Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP's December deal for a 20-year lease in a midtown Manhattan skyscraper, helped fuel the hottest legal office space market since before the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • February 27, 2024

    NC Short-Term Rental Law Fight Gets Partial Remand

    A North Carolina federal judge divvied up a proposed class action lodged by three vacation property companies claiming a county's recently passed zoning ordinance illegally places restrictions on short-term rentals, sending the state law claims back to state court but maintaining jurisdiction over the federal allegations.

  • February 27, 2024

    Connecticut Atty's Fishy Email Prompts Trust Account Audit

    A Connecticut Superior Court judge has ordered an attorney to cooperate with an official audit of his Webster Bank lawyer trust account after he responded to an overdraft notice and a commensurate disciplinary inquiry with an email saying the issue wasn't a priority because he was on a fishing trip.

  • February 27, 2024

    Wolverine Can't Get Sanctions Win In PFAS Coverage Fight

    An insurer repeatedly withheld relevant documents from shoewear company Wolverine in a coverage dispute over PFAS chemical injury suits, but the behavior was not egregious and did not cause enough damage to Wolverine's case to merit sanctions, a Michigan special master said Monday.

  • February 27, 2024

    Real Estate Group Of The Year: Greenberg Traurig

    Greenberg Traurig LLP attorneys helped the Metropolitan Transportation Authority complete the development of a major train terminal in New York City and advised a $2 billion transaction in which a Japanese real estate firm bought a 50% stake in a Manhattan office tower, landing the firm a spot among Law360's 2023 Real Estate Groups of the Year.

  • February 27, 2024

    Mass. AG Sues Boston Suburb For Flouting Housing Law

    Massachusetts Attorney General Andrea Joy Campbell is seeking an injunction, fines or possibly the appointment of a special master to force the Boston suburb of Milton to comply with a state housing law requiring multifamily zoning that the town's voters rejected in a referendum earlier this month, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday.

  • February 26, 2024

    BofA Battle Will Test Preemption's Reach At High Court

    The U.S. Supreme Court is set Tuesday to consider whether federal law exempts national banks from state-level escrow interest requirements, a case whose technical-sounding focus belies its hefty implications for the balance of federal and state regulatory power over many of the nation's big banks.

  • February 26, 2024

    Feds, Fla. Oppose Sharing Power In Clean Water Act Program

    The federal government and Florida are now fighting over how much power each should get after a D.C. federal judge struck down the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's decision to approve the Sunshine State's bid to assume authority over a key Clean Water Act permitting program.

  • February 26, 2024

    Pastor And Ally Of NYC Mayor Was A Con Man, Jury Hears

    A well-known Brooklyn pastor with close ties to New York City Mayor Eric Adams is a con man, a Manhattan federal prosecutor told jurors Monday, one who lied to lenders, stole from an elderly parishioner and claimed his connections to City Hall could result in millions of dollars in profits from a real estate deal.

  • February 26, 2024

    Timeshare Settlement Can't Stop Additional Consumer Suit

    A Washington marketing firm must face negligent misrepresentation and consumer protection claims over links to a timeshare-exit company, according to a Washington federal judge who ruled that a group of consumers seeking refunds are not barred from suing because of a settlement in another case.

  • February 26, 2024

    Fla. Official Can't Save Home From Verdict, Businessmen Say

    Two Miami businessmen have urged a federal judge to block a city commissioner's attempt to prevent the forced sale of his house to satisfy a $63.5 million judgment, saying he voted to unconstitutionally gerrymander the city's districts to include the property and also improperly claimed a last-minute homestead protection.

  • February 26, 2024

    Mich. Justices Told Case Deadlines Tied To Litigants' Rights

    A property management company has told the Michigan Supreme Court it should reaffirm that case filing deadlines are "substantive" policy matters because they are essential to litigants' right to be free from stale claims, as the court is expected to decide whether it improperly extended a grace period to filers during the pandemic. 

  • February 26, 2024

    Del. Justices Deny Second Chance For Texas Land Co. Suit

    Two investors in one of Texas' largest land holding companies lost a bid Monday for Delaware Supreme Court revival of a suit challenging a six-fold increase in company shares, upholding a Court of Chancery finding in December.

Expert Analysis

  • What New Calif. Strike Force Means For White Collar Crimes

    Author Photo

    The recently announced Central District of California strike force targeting complex corporate and securities fraud — following the Northern District of California's model — combines experienced prosecutorial leadership and partnerships with federal agencies like the IRS and FBI, and could result in an uptick in the number of cases and speed of proceedings, say attorneys at MoFo.

  • What Shareholder Approval Rule Changes Mean For Cos.

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission recently approved proposed rule changes to shareholder requirements by the New York Stock Exchange, an approval that will benefit listed companies in many ways, including by making it easier to raise capital from passive investors, say attorneys at Baker Botts.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

    Author Photo

    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Zimbabwe Ruling Bolsters UK's Draw As Arbitration Enforcer

    Author Photo

    An English court's recent decision in Border Timbers v. Zimbabwe, finding that state immunity was irrelevant to registering an arbitration award, emphasizes the U.K.'s reputation as a creditor-friendly destination for award enforcement, say Jon Felce and Tulsi Bhatia at Cooke Young.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Brazil

    Author Photo

    Environmental, social and governance issues have increasingly translated into new legislation in Brazil since 2020, and in the wake of these recently enacted regulations, we are likely to see a growing number of legal disputes in the largest South American country related to ESG issues such as greenwashing if companies are not prepared to adequately adapt and comply, say attorneys at Mattos Filho.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • High Court Case Could Reshape Local Development Fees

    Author Photo

    If last month's oral arguments are any indication of how the U.S. Supreme Court will rule in Sheetz v. County of El Dorado, it's unlikely the justices will hold that the essential nexus and rough proportionality tests under the cases of Nollan, Dolan and Koontz apply to legislative exactions, but a sweeping decision would still be the natural progression in the line of cases giving property owners takings claims, says Phillip Babich at Reed Smith.

  • Opinion

    White Collar Plea Deals Are Rarely 'Knowing' And 'Voluntary'

    Author Photo

    Because prosecutors are not required to disclose exculpatory evidence during plea negotiations, white collar defendants often enter into plea deals that don’t meet the U.S. Supreme Court’s “knowing” and “voluntary” standard for trials — but individual courts and solutions judges could rectify the issue, says Sara Kropf at Kropf Moseley.

  • How 2 CFPB Advisory Opinions Affect Reporting Agencies

    Author Photo

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued two advisory opinions last month that demonstrate a continued commitment to address inaccuracies in background check reports and consumer file disclosures through broad interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, expanding on a coordinated federal agency effort, say attorneys at Cooley.

  • Algorithmic Pricing Programs Caught In Antitrust Crosshairs

    Author Photo

    The Justice Department's investigation into software company RealPage follows a host of federal antitrust cases alleging that property owners and casino hotel operators use the same proprietary software programs to fix and maintain pricing, which means algorithmic pricing programs are considered a key price-fixing tool in the digital age, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

    Author Photo

    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • A Welcome Turning Of The Page For Residential Real Estate

    Author Photo

    After one of the most challenging years on record for residential real estate, 2024 will likely be a time of transition to a stabler business climate, as sellers lose some of their excess bargaining power and the pace of sales picks up, says Marty Green at Polunsky Beitel.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

    Author Photo

    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

    Author Photo

    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Real Estate archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!