Real Estate

  • February 20, 2024

    NM Fire Victims Sue FEMA Over Compensation Delays

    Ten New Mexico residents with property damaged by the Hermit's Peak/Calf Canyon Fire sued the Federal Emergency Management Agency in federal court Friday, saying FEMA is not processing their claims in a timely manner, in violation of an assistance measure Congress passed for victims of the wildfire.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fond Du Lac Tribe Seeks Sanctions In Mining Land Suit

    The Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians has asked a Minnesota federal judge to sanction PolyMet Mining Inc. in the tribe's suit over a land swap for a copper and nickel mine, arguing that the company and its lawyers are obstructing the discovery process.

  • February 20, 2024

    FinCEN Details Owner Data Access Rules For Small Banks

    The U.S. Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network on Tuesday released a compliance guide for small financial firms on accessing and safeguarding company ownership information that their customers are required to report under recently implemented rules.

  • February 20, 2024

    Developers Deny 'Shell Game' Amid Push For More Sanctions

    Real estate developers facing potential imprisonment over their failure to pay EB-5 investors at least $26 million in settlement and sanction judgments have told an Illinois federal court their money is not hidden in a "shell game" but rather tied up in receivership proceedings the investors already know about.

  • February 20, 2024

    Restoration Architect Says Visa Denial Ignored Evidence

    A Colombian restoration architect who wants to address the affordable housing shortage in the U.S., accused immigration officials in Florida federal court of disregarding more than 1,000 pages of evidence in denying him a national interest waiver for a visa.

  • February 20, 2024

    Pot Cos. Say They'll Be Ruined Unless Detroit Facility Opens

    Four cannabis companies have urged a Michigan federal court to prohibit the city of Detroit from taking any action that would impede their $15 million marijuana processing facility from opening, saying they are "in immediate danger of financial ruin" unless they operate the site as planned.

  • February 20, 2024

    Cool-Cheese Pizzeria Got Cold Feet Over $2.1M Sale, Suit Says

    A Pittsburgh pizzeria known for its unusual practice of putting cold cheese on its pies backed out of a $2.1 million sale just before a potential buyer came to visit, according to a lawsuit a real estate agent filed in Pennsylvania state court.

  • February 20, 2024

    Mich. Township Must Face Winery Wedding Ban Suit

    A Michigan federal judge has said he won't dismiss wineries' challenge to a Michigan town's rules limiting their ability to host weddings and other events, saying it would be "unwise" to toss the lawsuit because the wineries are still allegedly experiencing harm from the ordinance.

  • February 20, 2024

    Landlord Bias Can Be Eviction Defense, Colo. Justices Say

    The Colorado Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that tenants facing eviction can raise allegations of a landlord's discrimination or retaliation as a defense, directing a trial court to take another look at the case of a woman who accused her landlord of trying to boot her because she refused to have sex with him.

  • February 20, 2024

    NC Panel Finds Condos Short-Term Rental Ban Unreasonable

    The North Carolina Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday that a condominium owners association can't ban short-term rentals through an amendment to the neighborhood's covenants, reasoning the restriction was too radical a departure from the original rules.

  • February 20, 2024

    New Yorker Writer Pans Subpoena Over Adams' Ties To Pastor

    A writer for The New Yorker said that being forced to testify about an indicted Brooklyn pastor's ties to Mayor Eric Adams would step on journalistic privilege, arguing that Manhattan federal prosecutors could instead rely on other sources.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Give Feds Time In Texas, Fla. Social Media Law Fights

    The U.S. Supreme Court has set aside time for the federal government to weigh in on looming oral arguments in cases to determine the constitutionality of controversial Texas and Florida laws that restrict social media companies' ability to curb users' speech.

  • February 20, 2024

    Law Firm Wins Unredacted Deal Info In NJ Malpractice Fight

    A law firm has prevailed in a discovery battle against a sibling duo suing it for malpractice in New Jersey state court with a ruling that the plaintiffs must provide unredacted info about the settlement they reached in the underlying suit that the firm allegedly mishandled for them.

  • February 20, 2024

    Pa. Contractor Says Ohio Cosmetic Centers Skipped $2M Bill

    A construction contractor took the owner of several medical spa and cosmetic surgery practices to Pennsylvania state court on Friday after the healthcare firm allegedly halted projects in two Ohio suburbs and then failed to pay $2 million that the builder was owed for its work on them.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Passes On Rent Stabilization Probe, For Now

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined to investigate two challenges to specific aspects of New York's rent stabilization law Tuesday after refusing to hear a facial challenge to the same law in September, but left the door ajar for future litigation.

  • February 16, 2024

    Wyndham CEO Reports 'Expansive' FTC Query Into Takeover

    Wyndham Hotels and Resorts says that the Federal Trade Commission's "expansive" request for more information has "only increased" its concerns about the wisdom of Choice Hotels International's attempt to buy out the company without the board's blessing.

  • February 16, 2024

    NYCB Brass Face Investor Suit Over Signature Bank Takeover

    Executives and directors of New York Community Bank were named in a new shareholder derivative suit, adding to the growing list of litigation the bank and its leaders are facing over the fallout from its acquisition of Signature Bank's assets last year.

  • February 16, 2024

    PNC Bank Defeats Customer's Suit Over Fraudulent Transfer

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Friday tossed the two remaining claims in a suit alleging PNC Bank NA misled a California-based customer about stopping a money transfer to a scammer, saying the bank did not breach the account-holder agreement when it tried to recover the customer's funds.

  • February 16, 2024

    Cavco Exec's Insider Trading Case Paused Pending SEC Deal

    An Arizona federal judge on Friday paused the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's insider trading case against a former executive from modular home manufacturer Cavco Industries Inc. after the two sides reached a settlement in principle on the agency's 2017 claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    News broke last week that Delaware's Court of Chancery will say goodbye to its current longest-serving jurist, a development that quickly overshadowed a busy week of new merger and board disputes, fee rulings, settlements, and books-and-records demands.

  • February 16, 2024

    Florida Loses Wetland Permitting Authority In D.C. Court Case

    A D.C. judge has stripped Florida of its federally delegated authority to permit wetlands development, ruling that U.S. environmental regulators failed to analyze the impact of their decision on endangered and threatened species and handing a victory to conservation groups challenging the program.

  • February 16, 2024

    DOJ Says $3M Antitrust Deal Doesn't Fix Commission Rule

    The U.S. Department of Justice urged a Massachusetts federal court to reject a proposed $3 million settlement in an antitrust class action alleging a multiple listing service's commission rule inflated fees, saying the deal "perpetuates the very same competitive concerns that trouble the current rule."

  • February 16, 2024

    Gov't Wants More Alaskan Native Reps On Subsistence Board

    The U.S. government has plans to strengthen Alaskan Native tribal representation on its Federal Subsistence Board, saying the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have proposed a new rule to add board members with personal experience of subsistence living in rural Alaska.

  • February 16, 2024

    Chamberlain Hrdlicka Adds Corporate Attorney In Philly

    A seasoned transactions attorney has returned to private practice after more than 10 years as in-house counsel and joined Chamberlain Hrdlicka White Williams & Aughtry's Philadelphia office.

  • February 16, 2024

    Condo Co., Insurer Settle Proposed Class Action Coverage

    A Miami condominium, its former management company and various insurers agreed to settle coverage for a proposed class action accusing the condominium companies of allowing the building to deteriorate, a Florida federal judge said Friday, staying the coverage litigation while the parties finalize the deal.

Expert Analysis

  • Assessing The Future Of Colorado's Economic Loss Rule

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    The Colorado Supreme Court's decision to review a state appellate court's ruling in Mid-Century Insurance Co. v. HIVE Construction will significantly influence the future of Colorado's economic loss rule, with high stakes for the cost of doing business in the state, says David Holman at Crisham & Holman.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • How Recent Laws Affect Foreign Purchase Of US Real Estate

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    Early diligence is imperative for U.S. real estate transactions involving foreign actors, including analysis of federal and state foreign investment laws implicated by the transaction, depending on the property's nature and location, the parties' citizenship, and the transaction's structure, say Massimo D’Angelo and Anthony Rapa at Blank Rome.

  • Opinion

    New La. Gas Pipeline Projects Must Respect Rules And Rights

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    As pipeline developers rush to join in Louisiana's Haynesville Shale gas boom, established operators like Energy Transfer are justified in demanding that newer entrants respect safety rules, regulatory requirements and property rights when proposing routes that would cross existing pipelines, says Joshua Campbell at Campbell Law.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Reducing Carbon Footprint Requires A Tricky Path For CRE

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    As real estate owners find themselves caught between rapidly evolving environmental, social and governance initiatives and complicated societal debate, they will need to carefully establish formal plans to remain both competitive and compliant, say Michael Kuhn and Mahira Khan at Jackson Walker.

  • New CMS Rule Will Change Nursing Facility Disclosures

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    A new rule from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services significantly expands disclosure requirements for nursing facilities backed by private equity companies or real estate investment trusts, likely foreshadowing increased oversight that could include more targeted audits, say Janice Davis and Christopher Ronne at Morgan Lewis.

  • What New Calif. Strike Force Means For White Collar Crimes

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    The recently announced Central District of California strike force targeting complex corporate and securities fraud — following the Northern District of California's model — combines experienced prosecutorial leadership and partnerships with federal agencies like the IRS and FBI, and could result in an uptick in the number of cases and speed of proceedings, say attorneys at MoFo.

  • What Shareholder Approval Rule Changes Mean For Cos.

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission recently approved proposed rule changes to shareholder requirements by the New York Stock Exchange, an approval that will benefit listed companies in many ways, including by making it easier to raise capital from passive investors, say attorneys at Baker Botts.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Zimbabwe Ruling Bolsters UK's Draw As Arbitration Enforcer

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    An English court's recent decision in Border Timbers v. Zimbabwe, finding that state immunity was irrelevant to registering an arbitration award, emphasizes the U.K.'s reputation as a creditor-friendly destination for award enforcement, say Jon Felce and Tulsi Bhatia at Cooke Young.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Brazil

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    Environmental, social and governance issues have increasingly translated into new legislation in Brazil since 2020, and in the wake of these recently enacted regulations, we are likely to see a growing number of legal disputes in the largest South American country related to ESG issues such as greenwashing if companies are not prepared to adequately adapt and comply, say attorneys at Mattos Filho.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • High Court Case Could Reshape Local Development Fees

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    If last month's oral arguments are any indication of how the U.S. Supreme Court will rule in Sheetz v. County of El Dorado, it's unlikely the justices will hold that the essential nexus and rough proportionality tests under the cases of Nollan, Dolan and Koontz apply to legislative exactions, but a sweeping decision would still be the natural progression in the line of cases giving property owners takings claims, says Phillip Babich at Reed Smith.

  • Opinion

    White Collar Plea Deals Are Rarely 'Knowing' And 'Voluntary'

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    Because prosecutors are not required to disclose exculpatory evidence during plea negotiations, white collar defendants often enter into plea deals that don’t meet the U.S. Supreme Court’s “knowing” and “voluntary” standard for trials — but individual courts and solutions judges could rectify the issue, says Sara Kropf at Kropf Moseley.

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