Technology

  • February 21, 2024

    FCC Commissioner To Meet With Indian Gov't On TikTok Ban

    FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr is finally getting the chance to chat with Indian officials about the country's decision to ban TikTok over concerns about the Chinese government's influence over the app, a decision he has pushed for here in the United States, during a visit to India.

  • February 21, 2024

    Salesman Accused Of AI Misuse Must Hand Over Co. Docs

    A Connecticut salesman who allegedly used the artificial intelligence application Otter to record company calls must return any of his former employer's internal documents that are still in his possession and swear that he no longer has any of the material at issue in a trade secrets lawsuit, a federal judge has ruled.

  • February 21, 2024

    Tesla, Musk Say Investors' Self-Driving Fraud Suit Is Doomed

    Attorneys for electric-car maker Tesla and its owner, Elon Musk, have said a proposed class action related to claims the company and billionaire had made about the vehicles' autonomous driving abilities should be dismissed, saying most of the statements at issue were forward-looking.

  • February 21, 2024

    FCC Considers Adding Missing Persons To Emergency Alerts

    The Federal Communications Commission plans to introduce a new code to the Emergency Alert System to allow information about missing or endangered persons to be widely disseminated.

  • February 21, 2024

    Consumer Data Co. Gets OK For $50M Ch. 11 Sale

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge Wednesday approved the $50 million sale of Near Intelligence after being told that unsecured creditors' objections to the California-based consumer data gathering platform's Chapter 11 plan had been resolved.

  • February 21, 2024

    JPMorgan Got $400M Before Inovalon Sale, Del. Justices Hear

    Inovalon didn't properly disclose that investors that bought the healthcare data company in 2021 paid $400 million in fees to its financial adviser, a JPMorgan unit, before the transaction, a reason enough to revive a lawsuit challenging the $7.3 billion acquisition, counsel for stockholders told Delaware's Supreme Court Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    FCC Looks To Finalize 'All-In' Cable Pricing Disclosures

    The Federal Communications Commission plans to vote next month on controversial rules to require cable companies to post "all-in" prices on marketing materials and subscriber bills.

  • February 21, 2024

    NY Court Weighs Greenlighting Celsius Ch. 11 Suits

    A New York bankruptcy judge on Wednesday considered whether to hear two lawsuits filed in the Chapter 11 case of former cryptocurrency platform Celsius Network LLC, or if the complaints involving an account holder and a digital asset mining company should be dismissed or sent to arbitration.

  • February 21, 2024

    AT&T Says Satellite Cell Coverage Must Rely On Leases

    The Federal Communications Commission will soon vote on new rules allowing satellite companies to use spectrum to beef up mobile connectivity, helping eliminate "dead zones."

  • February 21, 2024

    Bankman-Fried Gets New Attys After Waiving Crypto Conflict

    A Manhattan federal judge signed off Wednesday on Sam Bankman-Fried's choice of new counsel ahead of his fraud sentencing, despite the fact that the convicted FTX founder's new team represents an indicted ex-crypto CEO whose interests may conflict with his own.

  • February 21, 2024

    Uber Says Insurers Failed To Cover Dozens Of Injury Suits

    Uber's insurers failed to live up to their obligations to defend the company and its for-hire drivers in dozens of personal injury lawsuits, the ride-hailing giant claims in two suits filed in New York federal court, saying that the companies' conduct had a negative impact on thousands of New York City drivers.

  • February 21, 2024

    Atlantic City Hotels Want Room Rate Suit Tossed

    Atlantic City casinos said on Tuesday a suit alleging they conspired to inflate room rates should be tossed, arguing it doesn't show there was any kind of agreement between the casinos and that its claims are partially time-barred.

  • February 21, 2024

    Calif. AG Settles With DoorDash Over Marketing Data Sale

    DoorDash will pay $375,000 to resolve the California attorney general's claims that the food delivery service violated the state's landmark consumer privacy law by failing to clearly inform users of their ability to opt out of the sale of their personal information to a marketing vendor, the agency announced Wednesday.

  • February 21, 2024

    House Leaders Create Bipartisan AI Task Force

    The House of Representatives is forming a bipartisan task force on artificial intelligence, with leaders in the lower chamber planning to explore ways to maintain America's lead on AI while considering "guardrails" for the technology.

  • February 21, 2024

    White House Acts To Shore Up Cybersecurity At US Ports

    The Biden administration on Wednesday moved to boost cybersecurity at U.S. ports, announcing a series of actions that include new proposed rules to establish minimum data security safeguards and an executive order requiring transportation vessels and facilities to report cyber incidents.

  • February 20, 2024

    US Small Businesses Have Most To Lose From Digital Duties

    The possible demise of an international moratorium on tariffs for digital products, including software and media downloads, could cut into small businesses' profits and create compliance burdens for the companies that survive.

  • February 20, 2024

    Google Co-Founder Sergey Brin Sued Over Fatal Plane Crash

    The widow of a pilot has accused Google's co-founder Sergey Brin of delaying efforts to recover her husband's body after he crashed into the Pacific Ocean while ferrying Brin's private aircraft, saying Brin tried to cover up illegal alterations made to the plane, according to the suit filed in California state court.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Won't Use Roku's Failed IPRs To End Reexams

    The Federal Circuit on Tuesday shot down Ioengine LLC's argument that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office must be stopped from having examiners reconsider its patents, saying the patent owner doesn't need mid-dispute relief.

  • February 20, 2024

    Apple Asks For Discovery Pause During Class Cert. Appeal

    Apple is urging a California federal judge to halt discovery in a sweeping App Store antitrust suit while the company appeals the class certification granted earlier this month.

  • February 20, 2024

    DirecTV Slams Studies Showing No 12 GHz Interference

    DirecTV is defending its supremacy in the 12 gigahertz band, pushing back against analysis showing that terrestrial 5G use of the band wouldn't lead to interference in a new filing with the Federal Communications Commission.

  • February 20, 2024

    Software Engineer Gets 6 Months For Twilio Insider Trading

    A Bay Area man will spend six months in prison and forfeit over $130,000 after pleading guilty to trading on inside information about customer engagement platform Twilio Inc.

  • February 20, 2024

    Conn. Judge Reluctantly Frees Snap From Sex Assault Suit

    A Connecticut state judge on Friday reluctantly ended a suit alleging Snap Inc. linked an underage girl to registered sex offenders who raped and assaulted her, quoting a First Circuit opinion that held such cases are difficult since Section 230 requires courts to deny relief "to plaintiffs whose circumstances evoke outrage."

  • February 20, 2024

    Judge Says He'll Mull $10M Fine For Racist Robocaller

    An Idaho white supremacist has been found liable by a Montana federal court for sending out thousands of racist robocalls in an attempt to sway public opinion against Black and Jewish political candidates, with a fine that could top $10 million to follow.

  • February 20, 2024

    FinCEN Details Owner Data Access Rules For Small Banks

    The U.S. Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network on Tuesday released a compliance guide for small financial firms on accessing and safeguarding company ownership information that their customers are required to report under recently implemented rules.

  • February 20, 2024

    GAO Says Army Was Fair In Awarding $169M IT Upgrade Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has denied a Maryland company's protest of a $169 million information technology infrastructure modernization deal for the U.S. Army, rejecting its claim that the Army assessed a competitor's strengths while overlooking the company's despite them having similarities.

Expert Analysis

  • Copyright Lessons Following Ruling In Artist AI Suit

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    The recent California district court ruling in Andersen v. Stability AI — that artists needed to specify how the training of artificial intelligence tools violated their copyrights — shows that lawyers on either side of generative AI matters must carefully navigate copyright issues including temporary copying and data sourcing, says Carlos Araya at Magnolia Abogados.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • Fed. Circ. In Jan.: One Word Can Affect Claim Construction

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    The Federal Circuit's recent Pacific Biosciences v. Personal Genomics decision highlights how even construction of a simple term can be dispositive, and thus disputed, in view of the specific context provided by the surrounding claim language, say Jeremiah Helm and Sean Murray at Knobbe.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Following Banking Regulators' Breadcrumbs To 2024 Priorities

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    Through blog posts, speeches, and formal guidance and regulations, prudential and other federal and state financial regulators laid out a road map last year pointing to compliance priorities that should be reflected in financial institutions' planning this year, say Laurel Loomis Rimon and Gina Shabana at Jenner & Block.

  • UK Ruling Revitalizes Discussions On Harmonizing AI And IP

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    The U.K. Supreme Court's decision in Thaler v. Comptroller-General last month has reinvigorated ongoing discussions about how the developments in artificial intelligence fit within the existing intellectual property legislative landscape, illustrating that effective regulation will be critical as the value and influence of this sector grows, say Nick White and Olivia Gray at Charles Russell.

  • Directors And Officers Face Unique AI-Related Risks

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    As privacy, intellectual property and discrimination lawsuits focusing on artificial intelligence increase, corporate directors and officers must stay aware of associated risks, including those related to compliance, litigation and cybersecurity, says Jonathan Meer at Wilson Elser.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • New Strain Of Web Tracking Suits Pose Risks For Retailers

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    Amid an ongoing surge of California state and federal lawsuits that are using novel theories to allege companies used certain recording technologies to illegally track website users, retailers should take steps to develop a potential argument that customers consented to any alleged uses of these devices, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • AI Takes Transformers Beyond Robots In Disguise

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    At the intersection of artificial intelligence and copyright law, the shape-shifting models known as transformers raise the question of whether using copyrighted materials to train such models constitutes a transformative use, says Sean Li at Benesch.

  • NC TikTok Order Holds Lessons On Handling State AG Probes

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    Earlier this month, a North Carolina appeals court compelled TikTok to give the state attorney general information relating to 98,000 recorded Zoom meetings, reminding companies that successful civil litigation strategies may have the opposite effect in the state or regulatory investigation context, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • AI Inventorship Patent Options After UK Supreme Court Ruling

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    The U.K. Supreme Court's recent ruling in Thaler v. Comptroller-General of Patents, Designs and Trade Marks that an AI system cannot be an inventor raises questions about alternative approaches to patent protection for AI-generated inventions and how the decision might affect infringement and validity disputes around such patents, says David Knight at Brown Rudnick.

  • Considerations For Lawyer Witnesses After FTX Trial

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    Sam Bankman-Fried's recent trial testimony about his lawyers' involvement in FTX's business highlights the need for attorney-witnesses to understand privilege issues in order to avoid costly discovery disputes and, potentially, uncover critical evidence an adversary might seek to conceal, says Lawrence Bluestone at Genova Burns.

  • Del. Dispatch: Efforts Clause Trumps Contractual Right

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    The Delaware Court of Chancery's Chordia v. Lee ruling this month — that the efforts clause set forth in a stockholders' agreement overrode the acquired company's right to fire its officers and employees — highlights key considerations for parties in such agreements to avoid post-acquisition disputes, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

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