Technology

  • February 15, 2024

    State Dept. Offers $5M For Info On 'BlackCat' Ransomware Group

    The State Department is offering millions for information on the "BlackCat" ransomware, claiming that the AlphV cybercrime group has compromised over 1,000 entities globally.

  • February 15, 2024

    FCC To Expand Emergency Alerts In Multiple Languages

    The Federal Communications Commission proposed new rules Thursday that would make it easier to broadcast emergency alerts in multiple languages on TV and radio.

  • February 15, 2024

    Software Company Seeks $10M Policy Limit For Bad Deal

    A software company told a California federal court that its insurer breached its contract by failing to cover $10 million in damages suffered because of misrepresentations made by a property and casualty insurance software company it bought.

  • February 15, 2024

    Byju's Insiders Seek Ch. 11 Dismissal, Calling It Litigation Ploy

    Affiliates of Indian tech giant Byju's U.S. arm, which are embroiled in state court litigation with the company's lender, asked a Delaware bankruptcy judge to dismiss the company's Chapter 11 case, saying the bankruptcy petition was filed to stymie the ongoing state court litigation.

  • February 15, 2024

    Calif. Jury Clears Duplo In Trial Over MGI Printer Patents

    A California federal jury has found that Duplo USA Corp. didn't infringe any claims of MGI Digital Technology SA's printer patents it was accused of infringing and that those claims were invalid, according to a verdict made public Thursday,

  • February 15, 2024

    Google, AGs Told To Step Up Discovery In Texas-Led Suit

    A Texas federal judge on Thursday told counsel for Google and a coalition of states led by Texas that they must do a better job coordinating discovery in an antitrust suit accusing the tech giant of monopolizing the online ad market.

  • February 15, 2024

    Bogus NSA Worker To Pay SEC $2.2M In Crypto Scam Case

    An alleged crypto fraudster who told would-be investors he was a former Marine and a onetime employee of the National Security Agency will pay over $2.2 million to end U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission claims he faces in Florida federal court.

  • February 15, 2024

    Real Estate Rumors: Brause Realty, Microsoft, AcadeMir

    A Brause Realty venture has reportedly scored $75 million in financing for a New York mixed-use project, Microsoft is said to have paid roughly $17.7 million for nearly 300 acres in Minnesota, and AcadeMir Charter Schools has reportedly paid $16.6 million for a Florida property.

  • February 15, 2024

    GSA Probed For Buying Banned Chinese Conferencing Cams

    The House Oversight Committee's Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Information Technology, and Government Innovation is probing the General Services Administration's purchase of videoconference cameras made in China following a recent report by the GSA's internal watchdog the subcommittee said raised alarming questions.

  • February 15, 2024

    Med Monitoring Claims In Philips MDL Sent Back For Review

    The judge overseeing multidistrict litigation over Koninklijke Philips NV's recalled breathing machines has declined a special master's recommendation to trim claims seeking medical monitoring for some users, instead sending the case back for a deeper look at which states would allow such claims or whether they required proof of physical injury.

  • February 15, 2024

    DOJ Says It Disrupted Russian Router Malware Network

    The U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday it had disabled a network of office internet routers that were being used by a Russian intelligence unit to engage in malware campaigns against U.S. and foreign governments as well as military officials and corporations.

  • February 15, 2024

    62 Senators Support Updated Kids Online Safety Act

    A bipartisan group of 62 senators, including Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., announced on Thursday their support for an updated version of the Kids Online Safety Act.

  • February 15, 2024

    Japan's Renesas Paying $5.9B For Software Company Altium

    Japanese semiconductor maker Renesas Electronics said Thursday it has agreed to buy automation software company Altium Ltd. for about $9.1 billion Australian dollars ($5.9 billion) as it looks to bolster its electronics design product offerings, sending Altium's stock soaring about 29%.

  • February 15, 2024

    Deals Rumor Mill: Sony-Michael Jackson, Inspire IPO, Walmart

    Sony plans to acquire half of Michael Jackson's catalog; private equity firm Roark Capital is planning to list Inspire Brands, which owns Dunkin' and other food chains; and Walmart is pursuing an acquisition of TV maker Vizio. Here, Law360 breaks down these and other notable deal rumors from the past week.

  • February 14, 2024

    Apple Unit Must Face Revived Bias And Retaliation Claims

    An Apple software subsidiary must face a former employee's gender discrimination and retaliation claims, a California appellate panel ruled on Tuesday, saying there is substantial evidence of discrimination toward the employee that raises a triable issue related to why she left the company.

  • February 14, 2024

    9th Circ. Open To Rebooting Suit Over Apple App Crypto Theft

    A Ninth Circuit panel appeared open Wednesday to reviving a putative class action alleging Apple misrepresented the safety of its App Store after users' cryptocurrency was stolen from an app, with two judges questioning why the allegations can't survive when Apple has consistently touted its security in separate antitrust litigation.

  • February 14, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Google's Use Of User Data Quotas Draws 9th Circ. Analogies

    A Ninth Circuit panel Wednesday struggled to find an apt analogy for a property claim made by Android users alleging in a proposed class action that Google illegally uses their purchased data allotments to transmit information back to the company, comparing the intangible data to electricity or an annuity, among other hypotheticals.

  • February 14, 2024

    Network Group Wants Faster Access To Utility Poles

    Federal regulators must push for further reforms in order to expedite talks between utility pole owners and high-speed equipment attachers on how to divvy up pole upgrade costs, a broadband trade group said.

  • February 14, 2024

    'Addictive' Tinder, Hinge Apps Break Hearts, V-Day Suit Says

    Match Group intentionally designs its Tinder and Hinge dating apps to be addictive in order to lock users into a "perpetual pay-to-play loop," prioritizing profits over its marketing promises of helping people make romantic connections, according to a proposed class action filed in California federal court on Valentine's Day.

  • February 14, 2024

    Honda, Ford Push For Review Of New Wireless IP

    Honda is urging U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Director Kathi Vidal to vacate the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's decision not to review a Neo Wireless patent it had challenged, the same day Ford did the same.

  • February 14, 2024

    PTAB Denies DJI's Request To Review Textron Drone Patent

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board will not review the validity of a Textron Innovations Inc. drone patent challenged by Chinese rival SZ DJI Technology Co. Ltd. after finding that DJI failed to show that the claims are likely invalid.

  • February 14, 2024

    FCC Must Distribute School IT Funds, Tech Firms Tell DC Circ.

    Two tech companies are calling on the D.C. Circuit to force the Federal Communications Commission to release funds to pay for information technology and broadband services the firms provide in elementary and secondary schools around the country.

  • February 14, 2024

    Legal Org. Backs Lyft In Supreme Court PAGA Fight

    Representative and individual claims brought under California's Private Attorneys General Act are inseparable when it comes to arbitration, a legal organization told the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, backing Lyft's challenge to a California state appellate court's decision preserving a former driver's representative claims.

  • February 14, 2024

    FinCEN Head Vows No 'Gotcha' Enforcement Of New Rules

    The director of the U.S. Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network said during a Wednesday congressional hearing that the agency is not pursuing "gotcha" enforcement when it comes to companies complying with new rules for reporting their beneficial ownership information.

  • February 14, 2024

    Google Again Targets 'Strategic' Texas AGs' Ad Tech Delays

    Google is hoping a newly appointed special master can finally force a coalition of state attorneys general led by Texas to hand over "fundamental information" it said Tuesday has long been improperly withheld from one of three cases targeting its dominance over display advertising placement auction technology.

Expert Analysis

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • What Cos. Can Learn From 2023 Export Enforcement Report

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    A January report summarizing key actions and policy changes undertaken at the Office of Export Enforcement in 2023 is a valuable indicator of future government priorities and the factors companies should consider as they conduct export operations amid what may be a turbulent international trading environment in 2024, says Thaddeus McBride at Bass Berry.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Parsing The USPTO's Guidelines For Assessing Enablement

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    Ryan Hagglund at Loeb & Loeb details the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office's recent guidelines for assessing enablement principles set forth in the U.S. Supreme Court's 2023 Amgen v. Sanofi decision, including how the guidelines can apply to all fields of technology.

  • What's In NY's Draft Guidance On AI Use In Insurance

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    Last week, the New York State Department of Financial Services released proposed guidance for insurers on the use of artificial intelligence systems and external consumer data and information sources for underwriting and pricing purposes, and these standards will likely help form the basis of an eventual nationwide insurance regulatory framework on AI, say attorneys at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • Generative AI Model Evals: A Primer For Compliance Officers

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    A better understanding of evaluation and benchmarking practices for generative artificial intelligence can help compliance officers and other responsible AI practitioners identify associated risks and the degree to which mitigation might prove effective, say Collin Starkweather and Ekene Chuks-Okeke at Luminos.Law.

  • Mitigating Compliance And Litigation Risks Of Evolving Tech

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    Amid artificial intelligence and other technological advances, companies must prepare for the associated risks, including a growing suite of privacy regulations, enterprising class action theories and consumer protection challenges, and proliferating disclosure obligations, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • How States Vary On The Fireman's Rule And Its Applicability

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    A recent decision by the Indiana Court of Appeals, reviving a firefighter’s suit, is illustrative of changes in the application and interpretation by state courts and legislatures of the Fireman’s Rule, which bans first responders from recovering for injuries sustained on the job, says Shea Feagin at Swift Currie.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Canada

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    In Canada, multiple statutes, regulations, common law and industry guidance address environmental, social and governance considerations, with debate over ESG in the business realm potentially growing on the horizon, say attorneys at Blakes.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Antitrust Practitioners Should Address AI's Collusive Potential

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    As the sophistication of AI rapidly advances, there are also concerns that it could give rise to entirely new forms of conduct, raising serious questions as to whether and how existing antitrust principles should be applied, and a need for common understanding of the technology's implications and market impacts, says David Bamberger at DLA Piper.

  • The Section 230 Immunity Provision Debate Continues

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    The Fifth Circuit last month voted in Doe v. Snap Inc. not to reconsider en banc its decade-old interpretation of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which generally allows websites to police objectionable content as they see fit — but a growing number of judges appear motivated to further limit the scope of its immunity, say Jordan Rice and Caleb Hayes-Deats at MoloLamken.

  • How Lease Obligations Can Affect Subchapter V Debt Cap

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    Two recent bankruptcy rulings in the Eastern District of Virginia and the Southern District of New York take opposite positions on whether unmatured lease obligations are considered noncontingent debt for the purposes of calculating debtors' Subchapter V eligibility, say Joseph Orbach and Henry Thomas at Thompson Coburn.

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