Telecommunications

  • February 20, 2024

    FCC Panel To Focus On AI's Consumer Impact

    The Federal Communications Commission set a consumer advisory panel back into motion Tuesday, with the impact of artificial intelligence on the telecom industry as a top priority.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Apple Patent Challenge In $576M Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused Tuesday to consider if Apple should have been barred from joining a successful challenge to network security patents in a $576.5 million case, turning down cybersecurity company VirnetX Inc.'s argument that Apple's petition was filed too late.

  • February 16, 2024

    FCC Needs Enforcement Ombudsman, Ex-Agency Atty Says

    The Federal Communications Commission should consider a wide range of enforcement-related reforms, including creating an ombudsman's office to help companies navigate disputes that crop up during FCC investigations, a former agency general counsel has argued in a new industry-backed paper.

  • February 16, 2024

    Samsung Ordered To Arbitrate Hundreds Of BIPA Claims

    An Illinois federal judge has ordered Samsung Electronics to arbitrate 806 customers' biometric-privacy claims and to pay the American Arbitration Association for fees it owes in the slew of disputes, ruling that the company can't refuse to arbitrate under its own binding agreements.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Revives Comcast Patent Case, And Warns Its Atty

    The Federal Circuit on Friday revived a patent suit against Comcast over voice recognition technology, finding that a lower court misinterpreted the patents, and reprimanded a Comcast attorney from Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP for exceeding word counts in a brief in a related case.

  • February 16, 2024

    FCC Offers Incentives So Small Carriers Can Use Spectrum

    The Federal Communications Commission's new program to encourage spectrum licensees to divvy up their unused airwaves for sublease to smaller and more rural carriers is now up and running and accepting applications.

  • February 16, 2024

    States Defend Authority To Bring Texas Google Ad Tech Case

    State enforcers have told a Texas federal court they have standing to sue Google for allegedly violating federal antitrust law with its control over key digital advertising technology, arguing that states play an important role in enforcing the statutes and that Google's dismissal bid is unfounded.

  • February 16, 2024

    Malware Schemer 'Tank' Pleads Guilty To Stealing Millions

    Accused hacker group leader Vyacheslav Igorevich Penchukov, known online as "Tank," pled guilty in Nebraska federal court to charges stemming from two malware schemes Thursday.

  • February 16, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen a legal battle erupt between JPMorgan and the founder of a Greek payments company following a dispute over the valuation of their jointly owned fintech business, the children of late Russian oligarch Vladimir Scherbakov face a claim by Fieldfisher LLP, the Director of Education and Training at the Solicitors Regulation Authority tackle a claim by two solicitors, and train operator First MTR South Western Trains file a claim against a security company. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • February 15, 2024

    Home Depot, Google Sued Over AI Customer Call Monitoring

    Home Depot and Google were hit with a proposed class action in California federal court Wednesday, accusing them of deploying artificial intelligence technology to surreptitiously "eavesdrop" on calls between customers and Home Depot's representatives without permission, in violation of Golden State privacy laws.

  • February 15, 2024

    FCC Wants Licensing Revamp To Help Hatch Space Industries

    The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday proposed ways to streamline federal licensing needed to support an array of services in space, including manufacturing and parts assembly.

  • February 15, 2024

    FCC Makes It Easier To Revoke Robocall Consent

    The Federal Communications Commission has ushered in new rules that are supposed to make it easier than ever for consumers to revoke previously given consent to receive telemarketing calls and text messages.

  • February 15, 2024

    7th Circ. Questions $4M Samsung Arbitration Fee Order

    The Seventh Circuit seemed skeptical Thursday that more than 35,000 Samsung consumers had enough evidence to prove the telecommunications giant should pay $4 million in individual biometric privacy arbitration fees, as one judge also questioned whether the appeal is properly before the court. 

  • February 15, 2024

    Lenovo, Motorola Lose Injunction Bid In IP License Fight

    A North Carolina federal judge has rejected a bid from Lenovo and Motorola Mobility to block Ericsson from being able to enforce injunctions it got in other countries barring sales of Lenovo products in those countries.

  • February 15, 2024

    Biz Groups Urge Feds To Back WTO's Block On Digital Duties

    Major U.S. trade and business groups, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Foreign Trade Council, urged U.S. officials to back the World Trade Organization's suspension of tariffs on electronic transmissions ahead of a renewal vote later this month.

  • February 15, 2024

    State Dept. Offers $5M For Info On 'BlackCat' Ransomware Group

    The State Department is offering millions for information on the "BlackCat" ransomware, claiming that the AlphV cybercrime group has compromised over 1,000 entities globally.

  • February 15, 2024

    FCC To Expand Emergency Alerts In Multiple Languages

    The Federal Communications Commission proposed new rules Thursday that would make it easier to broadcast emergency alerts in multiple languages on TV and radio.

  • February 15, 2024

    GSA Probed For Buying Banned Chinese Conferencing Cams

    The House Oversight Committee's Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Information Technology, and Government Innovation is probing the General Services Administration's purchase of videoconference cameras made in China following a recent report by the GSA's internal watchdog the subcommittee said raised alarming questions.

  • February 14, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Google's Use Of User Data Quotas Draws 9th Circ. Analogies

    A Ninth Circuit panel Wednesday struggled to find an apt analogy for a property claim made by Android users alleging in a proposed class action that Google illegally uses their purchased data allotments to transmit information back to the company, comparing the intangible data to electricity or an annuity, among other hypotheticals.

  • February 14, 2024

    Network Group Wants Faster Access To Utility Poles

    Federal regulators must push for further reforms in order to expedite talks between utility pole owners and high-speed equipment attachers on how to divvy up pole upgrade costs, a broadband trade group said.

  • February 14, 2024

    FCC Nixes NM Schools' Bid For Cancelled Radio Stations

    The Albuquerque Board of Education has no relationship with the person who surrendered two radio station licenses and, therefore, cannot petition the Federal Communications Commission to undo that decision and hand the licenses over to them as "trustees," the agency has declared.

  • February 14, 2024

    Honda, Ford Push For Review Of New Wireless IP

    Honda is urging U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Director Kathi Vidal to vacate the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's decision not to review a Neo Wireless patent it had challenged, the same day Ford did the same.

  • February 14, 2024

    Telecom Confusion Caused $56M Damages, Conn. Judge Told

    A telecommunications company's confusion about bankruptcy law played a key role in the disintegration of a contract for Los Angeles telephone switching equipment and related telecom services, a company seeking $56 million told a Connecticut state judge on Wednesday as a bench trial kicked off in the 14-year-old case.

  • February 14, 2024

    FCC Must Distribute School IT Funds, Tech Firms Tell DC Circ.

    Two tech companies are calling on the D.C. Circuit to force the Federal Communications Commission to release funds to pay for information technology and broadband services the firms provide in elementary and secondary schools around the country.

  • February 14, 2024

    Telefonica Gets Win In $570M Busted Deal Dispute

    A New York state judge has said Spanish telecommunications company Telefonica SA is entitled to compensatory damages in a suit it launched against Millicom International Cellular SA over claims the mobile provider reneged on a $570 million deal to buy Telefonica's Costa Rican subsidiary.

Expert Analysis

  • A Close Look At The FCC's Revised SIM Card Fraud Rules

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    Carolyn Mahoney and John Seiver at Davis Wright break down recently proposed revisions to the Federal Communications Commission's customer proprietary network information and local number portability rules for wireless providers, discuss the revisions' implications on artificial intelligence regulation, and provide tips to prevent SIM swap and port-out fraud.

  • What Retailers Should Note In Calif. Web Tracking Suits

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    As retailers face a deluge of class actions alleging the use of conventional web analytic tools violate wiretapping and eavesdropping provisions of the California Invasion of Privacy Act, uncovering the path toward a narrow interpretation of the law will largely depend on how these cases proceed, say Matthew Pearson and Kareem Salem at BakerHostetler.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • What Cos. Can Learn From 2023 Export Enforcement Report

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    A January report summarizing key actions and policy changes undertaken at the Office of Export Enforcement in 2023 is a valuable indicator of future government priorities and the factors companies should consider as they conduct export operations amid what may be a turbulent international trading environment in 2024, says Thaddeus McBride at Bass Berry.

  • How Consumer Product Cos. Can Keep Up With Class Actions

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    Recent cases show California's federal courts and the Ninth Circuit remain the preferred arena for consumers pursuing false advertising and trade deception claims against companies — so manufacturers, distributors and retailers of consumer products should continue to watch these courts for guidance on how to fight class actions, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Mitigating Compliance And Litigation Risks Of Evolving Tech

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    Amid artificial intelligence and other technological advances, companies must prepare for the associated risks, including a growing suite of privacy regulations, enterprising class action theories and consumer protection challenges, and proliferating disclosure obligations, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Canada

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    In Canada, multiple statutes, regulations, common law and industry guidance address environmental, social and governance considerations, with debate over ESG in the business realm potentially growing on the horizon, say attorneys at Blakes.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

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