Transportation

  • February 20, 2024

    5th Circ. Seeks Texas Justices' Input On LNG Permit Fight

    The Fifth Circuit has yanked its prior ruling that scrapped an emissions permit issued by Texas environmental regulators for a proposed liquefied natural gas terminal, saying it wants the state's Supreme Court to weigh in on how to define the best available pollution control technology under Texas law.

  • February 20, 2024

    How Future Litigators Are Training In A 'Flight Simulator'

    Law students who would traditionally experience only a few courtroom scenarios over a semester have begun working with programs that can provide an entire array of courtroom curveballs, thanks to large language model artificial intelligence technology.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Won't Pick Up Medical Drivers' Class Status Row

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Tuesday to review the D.C. Circuit's determination that a lower court must take another look at its finding that a group of nonemergency medical transportation drivers have enough in common to proceed as a class in their wage and hour action against their employer.

  • February 20, 2024

    9th Circ. Reinstates Air Traffic Controller's Age Bias Suit

    The Ninth Circuit revived a suit Tuesday from an air traffic controller who said the Federal Aviation Administration passed him over for promotions because of his age, ruling the agency can't hide behind a carveout that allows it to restrict the positions to younger applicants.

  • February 20, 2024

    Calif. Must Face Trimmed Suit Over Locomotive Emissions Rule

    A California federal judge has trimmed a lawsuit from rail industry groups challenging a new regulation requiring railroads to transition to zero-emission locomotives in the Golden State over the next decade, saying some parts aren't in effect yet but others may interfere with federal rules governing railroad operations.

  • February 20, 2024

    DC Circ. Says FERC Fight Over 'Onshore' Meaning Is Moot

    The D.C. Circuit has dumped a fight between the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and an advocacy group concerning whether the agency has jurisdiction over facilities that transport liquefied natural gas to port via truck, saying the dispute is moot because the proposed facility in question isn't being built.

  • February 20, 2024

    DoorDash Charges Excessive Fees, NYC Burger Eatery Says

    DoorDash was hit with a proposed class action Friday in California federal court by a New York City burger joint that accused the platform of employing a "widespread and pervasive practice" of levying service fees more than the 20% cap imposed by local legislations enacted during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fox Rothschild AI Chief Talks 'Terrifying' Deepfakes, Biased AI

    Mark McCreary, the chief artificial intelligence and information security officer at Fox Rothschild, leads his firm's internal AI strategy and provides counsel to other law firms trying to bushwhack their path through the often murky AI legal landscape, rife with hallucinated case law citations and disturbingly real deepfakes.

  • February 20, 2024

    Girardi Keese Trustee Recovers $1.8M In Fees For Exide Case

    A U.S. bankruptcy judge on Tuesday approved an agreement between the Girardi Keese bankruptcy trustee, a former attorney for the firm and the Mandell Law Firm to end an adversary proceeding connected to $1.8 million in attorney fees from a lawsuit over the toxic Exide battery plant in Vernon, California.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Question Reach Of Transportation Worker Carveout

    The U.S. Supreme Court questioned Tuesday whether there is still a need for a federal arbitration exemption for interstate transportation workers or if the century-old carveout is an "anachronism," in a case dealing with whether the exemption applies to workers only in the transportation industry.

  • February 20, 2024

    Amazon Agrees To Pay $5.5M To End COVID Screening Suit

    A group of California Amazon warehouse workers asked a federal judge to approve a $5.5 million settlement resolving a proposed collective action accusing the e-commerce giant of failing to pay workers for time they spent undergoing pre-shift COVID-19 screenings, saying it will provide them with all their alleged unpaid wages.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Won't Wade Into CSX Medical Leave Fight

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected former CSX Transportation employees' push for review of a Fourth Circuit ruling that ended their suit claiming they were unlawfully fired for requesting medical leave.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Fight Over Limits On Port Labor Protests

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to consider South Carolina's challenge to a Fourth Circuit ruling that allowed a dockworkers union to sue a shipping group over labor issues at a terminal at the Port of Charleston.

  • February 20, 2024

    Engineer Can't Get High Court Look At Service Dog ADA Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused on Tuesday to review a disability bias suit from a Union Pacific train engineer, leaving in place an Eighth Circuit ruling that said the company wasn't required to let the military veteran bring a service dog to work to help cope with PTSD.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Pass On Bid To Hold UK Co. Liable For Cessna Crash

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to hear a bid seeking to hold an English aerospace firm liable for a Cessna crash that killed three people, passing on an opportunity to resolve what the petitioners called a circuit split or give credence to a "vociferous dissent" within the Ninth Circuit's published opinion.

  • February 16, 2024

    State Farm 'Bad Deal' Can't Save Policyholders' Suit

    The Tenth Circuit on Friday refused to revive a proposed class action accusing State Farm of illegally denying full uninsured motorist coverage for policyholders, relatives and passengers, saying that the insurer may have sold them a "bad deal" but that they agreed to it.

  • February 16, 2024

    PTAB To Review Engine Patent After Court Axed It

    The BMW brand has won a decision from the patent board to review the validity of a patented method for calculating the valve timing in a car engine, over half a year after a federal judge in Illinois ruled that the patent failed the U.S. Supreme Court's Alice standard for patent eligibility.

  • February 16, 2024

    Uber Failed To Prevent Driver Sex Assaults, MDL Suit Says

    Uber has known for nearly a decade that its drivers were preying on and sexually assaulting passengers but failed to implement meaningful policies to prevent such crimes, according to a master complaint filed in multidistrict litigation in California federal court.

  • February 16, 2024

    4th Circ. Won't Rethink Overturning Bid-Rigging Conviction

    The Fourth Circuit declined to reconsider a panel ruling that overturned a former Contech executive's bid-rigging conviction, despite the U.S. Department of Justice's contention that the decision flouts long-standing precedent.

  • February 16, 2024

    Startup Countersues Trucker Tracking Co. For Stealing Tech

    A venture capital-backed startup that sells dashboard cameras to monitor truck drivers is responding to a rival's well-publicized patent infringement case by filing its own patent lawsuit in a different federal court that mirrors many of the same allegations of technological theft but pointing them in the other direction.

  • February 16, 2024

    Boeing And Lion Air Families Spar In 7th Circ. Jury Trial Bid

    The Seventh Circuit on Friday considered whether a more than century-old law governing fatal accidents occurring over the high seas allows the two remaining victims' estates suing Boeing over the Lion Air 737 Max crash to demand a jury trial.

  • February 16, 2024

    Uber Tells Court To Disregard Pa. AG's Brief In Wage Suit

    Uber urged a Pennsylvania federal court on Friday to disregard the state attorney general's amicus brief filed in a wage case that will decide whether UberBlack limo drivers are employees or independent contractors, saying the attorney general's involvement is superfluous.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-Yellow Corp. Workers Push WARN Class Cert In Ch. 11

    Former employees of trucking firm Yellow Corp. told a Delaware bankruptcy court that recognizing them as a class is the best way to handle their claim that the bankrupt company didn't give them adequate warning of layoffs.

  • February 16, 2024

    EU Launches First In-Depth Foreign Subsidy Probe

    The European Commission is launching an investigation into whether state assistance gave a Chinese train manufacturer a leg up in its bid for a Bulgarian government contract, the authority's first investigation under the European Union's new foreign subsidies regulation.

Expert Analysis

  • 3 Areas Of Focus In Congressional Crosshairs This Year

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    Companies must prepare for Congress to build on its 2023 oversight priorities this year, continuing its vigorous inquiries into Chinese company-related investments, workplace safety and labor relations issues, and generative artificial intelligence, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Protections May Exist For Cos. Affected By Red Sea Attacks

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    Companies whose ships or cargo have been affected by the evolving military conflict in the Red Sea, and the countries under whose flags those ships were traveling, may be able to seek redress through legal action against Yemen or Iran under certain international law mechanisms, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • What FTC CARS Rule Means For Auto Dealers And Lenders

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    A newly finalized Federal Trade Commission rule is aimed at changing how auto dealers interact with customers in the financing process, but will likely also affect banks and finance companies — and consequences for lenders and servicers have been amplified by recent Consumer Financial Protection Bureau enforcement actions, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • Growing Green Tech Demand Spells Trouble For Groundwater

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    Increasing demand for green technology is depleting the groundwater reserves used to extract and process the necessary minerals, making a fundamental shift toward more sustainable water use practices necessary at both the state and federal levels, says Sarah Mangelsdorf at Goldberg Segalla.

  • 8 Privacy Law Predictions For 2024

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    As the new year begins, looking back to several of last year's privacy law developments may help companies forecast what to focus on when updating their privacy programs, including children's privacy, so-called dark patterns and the collection of data by connected cars, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: South Africa

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    While South Africa has yet to mandate the reporting of nonfinancial and environmental, social, and corporate governance issues, policy documents and recent legislative developments are likely to have a material impact in the country's transition to a low-carbon economy and in meeting its international obligations, say Glynn Kent at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • 4 Legal Ethics Considerations For The New Year

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    As attorneys and clients reset for a new year, now is a good time to take a step back and review some core ethical issues that attorneys should keep front of mind in 2024, including approaching generative artificial intelligence with caution and care, and avoiding pitfalls in outside counsel guidelines, say attorneys at HWG.

  • Environmental Justice: A 2023 Recap And 2024 Forecast

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    A 2023 executive order directing each federal agency to make environmental justice part of its mission, as well as the many lawsuits and enforcement actions last year, demonstrates that EJ will increasingly surface in all areas of law and regulation, from technically challenging to seemingly ordinary permitting and construction matters, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • What The Law Firm Of The Future Will Look Like

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    As the legal landscape shifts, it’s become increasingly clear that the BigLaw business model must adapt in four key ways to remain viable, from fostering workplace flexibility to embracing technology, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • 4 PR Pointers When Your Case Is In The News

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    Media coverage of new lawsuits exploded last year, demonstrating why defense attorneys should devise a public relations plan that complements their legal strategy, incorporating several objectives to balance ethical obligations and advocacy, say Nathan Burchfiel at Pinkston and Ryan June at Castañeda + Heidelman.

  • After Headwinds, 2024 May See Offshore Wind Momentum

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    Despite skyrocketing raw material costs, conflicting state and federal policies, and other setbacks for the offshore wind sector in 2023, the industry appears poised for growth in the coming year, with improving economics, more flexible procurement procedures and increasing legislative support, say Emily Huggins Jones and Ben Cowan at Locke Lord.

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