Transportation

  • February 07, 2024

    Pratt & Whitney Docs Shielded From Airline's $30M Suit

    RTX Corp. subsidiary Pratt & Whitney won't be forced to hand over internal sales documents and communications as part of a $30 million feud between a competing airplane maintenance contractor and a British Airways affiliate that is playing out in an Illinois court, a Connecticut federal judge has ruled.

  • February 07, 2024

    Ford Says Explorer Recall Offers Doom Faulty Bolt Suit

    Ford Motor Co. is urging a Washington federal judge to toss a proposed class action accusing the automaker of selling Explorers designed with a single unreliable rear axle bolt, saying the dispute isn't ripe for litigation because the vehicle owners haven't exhausted their options under two ongoing recalls.

  • February 07, 2024

    Board Says Facts Need Sussing In ICE, Charter Biz $64M Battle

    The U.S. Civilian Board of Contract Appeals has refused to grant summary judgment to either U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement or an airline charter in a $64 million fight over canceled flights, saying too many factual disputes remain in the case.

  • February 07, 2024

    5th Circ. Pressed To Rethink Wipeout Of LNG Air Permit

    Developers of a proposed liquefied natural gas terminal on the Texas Gulf Coast told the Fifth Circuit that project opponents are wrongly asserting federal law in opposing requests for the appeals court to reconsider a panel's ruling that scrapped an emissions permit issued by state environmental regulators.

  • February 07, 2024

    Colo. Urges Court To Reject Bid To Nix Delivery, Ride Fees

    A Colorado court should throw out a suit from a conservative group challenging new fees on deliveries and online ride-hailing services, attorneys for the state said, arguing that the transportation funding law that created them does not violate any state statutes.

  • February 07, 2024

    Repair-Shop Slip Triggers Auto Coverage, Mich. Justices Say

    A woman who fell into a service pit during an oil change is entitled to personal injury protection benefits under Michigan's auto insurance law, the state's Supreme Court ruled Wednesday, finding the accident was sufficiently related to car maintenance.

  • February 07, 2024

    Panel Says Ohio Broke Promise In Brewery District Land Fight

    The Ohio appeals court ruled against the Buckeye State's transportation officials in a battle with Columbus business owners over property the state needed for a highway project, finding that the state agency's counsel acknowledged it did not deliver what it promised in a previous settlement.

  • February 07, 2024

    Trailer Co. Says Multisource Wheel Imports Didn't Skirt Duties

    A trailer manufacturer urged the U.S. Court of International Trade to unwind a ruling that it evaded tariffs reaching 680%, arguing it didn't know its wheels, made from materials from several countries, were covered by tariffs on Chinese wheels.

  • February 07, 2024

    Manatt Sued For Allegedly Botching $31M Dealership Row

    The owner of a Los Angeles car dealership has filed suit in California state court against Manatt Phelps & Phillips LLP, accusing the firm of legal malpractice that ultimately cost him a $31 million judgment stemming from a business dispute.

  • February 07, 2024

    Fla. Aircraft Co.'s Claims Narrowed In Hurricane Coverage Suit

    A Florida federal judge pumped the brakes on some of a Florida aircraft company's claims against its insurer related to its relocation in 2017 after Hurricane Irma, saying the company can't introduce previously concealed damages in the nearly $250,000 dispute. 

  • February 07, 2024

    Travelers Must Cover $2M Tainted Benzene Load, Co. Says

    A multinational chemical company accused Travelers in New York federal court of unreasonably denying coverage for over $2.1 million it lost from a contaminated benzene shipment, saying the insurer must also cover costs incurred from suing at-fault parties since it further evaded its subrogation obligations.

  • February 07, 2024

    EPA Says Stricter Soot Requirement Needed For Air Quality

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday tightened federal standards for fine particulate matter pollution, touting the action's health and economic benefits.

  • February 06, 2024

    1st Circ. Appears Unlikely To Deflate Balloon Fraud Verdict

    A defunct Massachusetts air balloon company on Tuesday struggled to persuade the First Circuit to throw out a fraud verdict by arguing that the jury had "rubber-stamped" a judge's damages estimate.

  • February 06, 2024

    3rd Circ. Frees Coast Guard From Suit Over Rescue Attempt

    The U.S. can't be held civilly liable for the drowning death of a conch fisherman, the Third Circuit ruled Tuesday, saying the seaman's estate could only maintain claims if the U.S. Coast Guard's rescue mission had actually put the man in more danger.

  • February 06, 2024

    NYC Says Co. Flouted Filing Rules In Migrant Bus Row

    New York City's Department of Social Services urged a federal judge to reject a letter filed with the court by a charter transportation company that was among others sued by the city to recoup costs from absorbing migrants bused in from Texas, saying the filing was out of turn.

  • February 06, 2024

    Diplomatic Row In Colo. As Consuls Sue Over License Plates

    Honorary consuls for several countries are suing Colorado revenue officials in state court for revoking their tax- and fee-free license plates, alleging in a complaint filed in state court that the state did so despite it being contrary to state law and practice going back more than 60 years.

  • February 06, 2024

    737 Max In Alaska Air Blowout Had 'Missing' Bolts, NTSB Says

    A mid-cabin panel that blew off a Boeing 737 Max 9 jet mid-flight last month appeared to have been missing four bolts meant to secure it in place, before the aircraft was ever delivered to Alaska Airlines, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a preliminary report Tuesday.

  • February 06, 2024

    Nissan Can't Make Supplier Pay $25M Award, 6th Circ. Says

    Nissan can't offload onto a brake supplier a $25 million award stemming from a fatal car crash, the Sixth Circuit ruled Tuesday, saying the jury found the braking system "as a whole" to be defective and not just parts supplied to the automaker.

  • February 06, 2024

    Toyota Sued For Fraud Over Maintenance Plan's Value

    Toyota allegedly deceived thousands of customers by falsely claiming its maintenance plan had a "superior value" to paying for each service individually, according to a proposed class action filed in California federal court Monday.

  • February 06, 2024

    Ex-Contech Exec Asks 4th Circ. To Toss More Convictions

    The U.S. Department of Justice and the former Contech executive who was convicted of bid-rigging both agree that the Fourth Circuit should rethink the decision that wiped out that conviction, but for different reasons — one wants the conviction reinstated, while the other says the panel didn't go far enough.

  • February 06, 2024

    Hose Maker Can't Escape Suit Over Sulfuric Acid Burns

    An Ohio appeals court has revived a man's injury claims against Gates Corp. over acid burns he suffered when a hose made by the company burst, saying his state-law claims are not preempted by the federal Hazardous Materials Transportation Act.

  • February 06, 2024

    BMW Drops Fight With Arigna Over Integrated Circuit Patent

    A Virginia federal judge has signed off on a joint request by BMW and Arigna Technology to dismiss the automaker's suit seeking a declaration that its Infineon integrated circuits did not infringe a patent held by Arigna, not long after BMW opposed an attempt by Arigna's counsel to leave the case.

  • February 06, 2024

    SAS Gets Clearance For Ch. 11 Plan Vote

    A New York bankruptcy judge on Tuesday congratulated SAS, the Stockholm-based owner of Scandinavian Airlines, for avoiding turbulence in its Chapter 11 case and granted the debtor permission at a hearing to send its reorganization plan out for a creditor vote.

  • February 06, 2024

    Water Co. Drivers Slam 'Out Of Touch' Bid To Ax OT Verdict

    A bottled water company's arguments that there was no evidence to support a jury's findings that it willfully violated federal overtime requirements are "out of touch" and completely rootless, a group of delivery workers told a Michigan federal judge, pushing back on the company's bid to undo their trial win.

  • February 06, 2024

    Ideanomics Not On Hook For EV Unit's Parts Contract

    Ideanomics has escaped an automotive parts manufacturer's lawsuit for now, with a Michigan state judge saying Monday there was insufficient evidence it took on the debts of an electric-vehicle company it acquired last year.

Expert Analysis

  • Ga. Ruling A Win For Plaintiffs Injured By Older Products

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    The Georgia Supreme Court's recent opinion in Ford Motor Co. v. Cosper gives plaintiffs the assurance that even if they are injured by older products, they can still bring claims under state law if the manufacturer used a design that it knew, or should have known, created a risk of substantial harm, says Rob Snyder at Cannella Snyder.

  • Opinion

    Air Ambulance Ch. 11s Show Dispute Program Must Resume

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    Air Methods’ recent bankruptcy filing highlights the urgent need to reopen the No Surprises Act’s independent dispute resolution program for air ambulances, whose shutdown benefits insurance companies and hurts providers, says Adam Schramek at Norton Rose.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • High Court Bakery Driver Case Could Limit Worker Arbitration

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    Employers that require arbitration of worker claims under the Federal Arbitration Act should closely follow Bissonnette v. LePage Bakeries as it goes before the U.S. Supreme Court, which could thoroughly expand the definition of “transportation workers” who are exempt from compulsory arbitration and force companies to field more employee disputes in court, says Nick Morisani at Phelps Dunbar.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • How To Advertise Carbon Reductions Under New Calif. Law

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    As more companies advertise their efforts to reach the status of carbon neutral or net zero, California's recently enacted Voluntary Carbon Market Disclosures Act aims to force companies to more clearly disclose the basis for such claims — and there's not a lot of time to comply, say Gonzalo Mon and Katie Rogers at Kelley Drye.

  • 5 Ways Maritime Cos. Can Enhance Sanctions Compliance

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    With economic sanctions evasion in maritime shipping at an all-time high, companies must do more than merely search for parties on sanctions lists to limit the serious legal and commercial risks they may face if compliance efforts fall short, say Jeffrey Orenstein and Catherine Johnson at K&L Gates.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • Calif. Right To Repair Law Highlights A Growing Movement

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    New legislation in California is a comprehensive victory for the "right to repair" movement — signaling that this push for legal reform represents a multifaceted challenge to the status quo not only on the consumer rights front, but also in the fields of copyright, software, antitrust and warranty law, says Courtney Sarnow at Culhane Meadows.

  • Calif. GHG Disclosure Law Will Affect Companies Worldwide

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    California's Climate Corporate Data Accountability Act, which will require comprehensive greenhouse gas emissions disclosures from large companies operating in the state, will mean compliance challenges for a wide range of industries, nationally and globally, as the law's requirements will ultimately trickle out and down, say attorneys at Brownstein Hyatt.

  • What Panama Canal Award Ruling Means For Int'l Arbitration

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    As the prevalence of international arbitration grows, the Eighth Circuit’s recent decision in Grupo Unidos v. Canal de Panama may change how practitioners decide what remedies to seek and where to raise them if claims are rejected, says Jerry Roth at FedArb.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Clarifies Title VII Claim Standards

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    The Second Circuit's recent opinion in Banks v. General Motors, although it does not break new ground legally, comes at a crucial time when courts are reevaluating standards that apply to Title VII claims of discrimination and provides many useful lessons for practitioners, says Carolyn Wheeler at Katz Banks.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

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    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • 3 Personal Jurisdiction Questions Mallory Leaves Unanswered

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    The due process framework that has cabined personal jurisdiction over nationwide and global businesses for the last eight decades looks increasingly precarious after this summer's fractured U.S. Supreme Court decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway Co., which left three key questions unanswered, says Andrew Rhys Davies at WilmerHale.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Expands The Horizons Of Debt Discharge

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    The Ninth Circuit Bankruptcy Appellate Panel’s recent ruling in RS Air v. NetJets demonstrates that creditors should not be quick to conclude that their recoveries are limited if a debtor commences bankruptcy and receives a discharge, and should instead consider other potential paths for recovery, like alter ego claims, say Dania Slim and Claire Wu at Pillsbury.

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