Transportation

  • April 04, 2024

    2nd Circ. Vacates Logistics Co.'s $1.8M Damaged Cargo Win

    A New York federal court erred by rejecting a Chubb unit's reimbursement bid for an over $1.8 million damaged drug shipment, the Second Circuit ruled Thursday, finding a genuine factual dispute on whether the logistics company in charge was a "contracting carrier" under an international treaty governing air shipments.

  • April 04, 2024

    BMW Dealer, Claims Manager End $4M Injury Settlement Fight

    A South Carolina BMW dealership and its insurers have agreed to end their suit against a claims manager over a $4 million personal injury settlement, with the claims manager also dropping allegations against the dealership's automotive group, according to a notice filed in North Carolina federal court.

  • April 04, 2024

    Mass. Airline Settles With Feds Over Noncompliant Flights

    A small Massachusetts commercial jet operator has agreed to settle a civil complaint by the U.S. government alleging it operated more than 1,000 flights without the required Federal Aviation Administration certifications, according to a filing.

  • April 04, 2024

    Full 9th Circ. Won't Review PAGA Ruling In Lowe's Suit

    The full Ninth Circuit won't review a panel's decision ruling that a Lowe's worker's nonindividual claims under California's Private Attorneys General Act could stay in court while her individual claims go into arbitration, denying the company's bid to step in.

  • April 04, 2024

    Sport Aircraft Maker Icon Hits Ch. 11 With $170M Debt

    Light-sport aircraft manufacturer Icon Aircraft filed for Chapter 11 protection in Delaware bankruptcy court Thursday with more than $170 million in debt and plans for an asset sale and liquidation.

  • April 03, 2024

    We Had No Conflict In Postal Service Bid, Co. Tells Fed Circ.

    A company excluded from a U.S. Postal Service explosives detection contract told the Federal Circuit on Wednesday that a claims court judge hadn't justified his ruling that a conflict of interest stemming from the company's previous work for the service couldn't be mitigated.

  • April 03, 2024

    Roadless Rule Doesn't Suit The Tongass, Alaska, Allies Argue

    The state of Alaska, electric utilities, and a coalition of towns, mining and business groups, as well as a former Last Frontier governor, are all urging a federal judge to overturn the Biden administration's decision to reinstate roadless area protections for millions of acres of the Tongass National Forest.

  • April 03, 2024

    Colo. Says Trial Unnecessary In Transportation Funding Fight

    Colorado told a state judge that a conservative group did not need a trial to "further develop the record" in its challenge to a transportation funding law, arguing that the group had its chances in discovery but only named a single witness, who can't testify about how the state law works.

  • April 03, 2024

    Insurer Wants $38M For Covering Unfinished Road Jobs

    An insurance company has asked a federal court to force companies connected to an insolvent contractor to hand over more than $38 million to compensate for costs it covered for unfinished jobs.

  • April 03, 2024

    Retailer BJ's Joins Fight Against Conn. Power Lines Project

    BJ's Wholesale Club Inc. has joined a sprawling legal fight challenging a Connecticut state agency's approval of an electric transmission line replacement project along the Metro-North railroad corridor in Fairfield and Bridgeport, adding its own lawsuit to a stack of litigation by local governments, churches and others.

  • April 03, 2024

    Insurer Says Rail Co. Must Pay In $400K Spoiled Chicken Suit

    Over $400,000 worth of frozen chicken thighs rotted on the move to Oregon, and an insurer who covered the putrid loss told a South Carolina federal court that the rail company responsible should pay for the screw-up.

  • April 03, 2024

    NJ Judge Grants Initial OK Of $2.7M EV Maker Investor Deal

    A New Jersey federal judge granted preliminary approval to a $2.7 million deal between investors and executives of an electric vehicle company after it went bankrupt, after finding his prior hesitations concerning the deal's notice plan had been resolved.

  • April 03, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Revive RV Driver's Ford Chassis Warranty Suit

    A Sixth Circuit panel has found that a lower court was correct to rule in favor of Ford Motor Co. in a potential class action claiming it is responsible for fixing alignment issues in recreational vehicles built with the car company's chassis.

  • April 03, 2024

    3rd Circ. Judge Wonders If Philly Union Rule Dispute Is Moot

    A Third Circuit judge on Wednesday wondered whether a former Philadelphia mayor's order requiring contractors to pay dues to "city-approved" unions was now moot, given the new administration's assurances that it won't be implemented, as contractors urged the court to find that the scrapped rule should be banned by law.

  • April 03, 2024

    Auto Insurer Seeks Payback After $2M Car Crash Settlement

    A business insurer of a man who crashed a rental car into a motorcyclist while working in Los Angeles should pay something in connection with a $2 million settlement with the injured biker, an auto insurer told a California federal court, seeking to recoup its expenses.

  • April 03, 2024

    Ethiopian Air Trial Set For November Over Boeing's Objections

    An Illinois federal judge said Wednesday that some pending lawsuits over a 2019 Ethiopian Airlines crash will go to trial late this year, despite Boeing's objections that he should hold off on setting a trial date to allow for fruitful settlement negotiations.

  • April 03, 2024

    Skanska Inks $1.4B Contract To Replace Seattle Bridge

    Skanska and Washington's Department of Transportation closed a $1.4 billion bridge replacement contract that aims to update Seattle's Portage Bay Bridge so that it's up to "current seismic resiliency standards," the construction and development company announced.

  • April 02, 2024

    Amazon Driver Took, Shared Pics of Actor's Home, Suit Says

    Actor Deon Cole sued Amazon in California state court alleging that one of its delivery drivers took photos of the inside of his home and shared them in a group chat while dropping off groceries, saying Amazon negligently and recklessly hired the driver.

  • April 02, 2024

    Uber Seeks Exit From Texas Riders' Claims In Assault MDL

    Uber urged a California federal court Monday to toss Texas plaintiffs' claims in the multidistrict litigation seeking to hold the ride-hailing company liable for drivers' sexual assault, saying it can't be held responsible for the actions of individual drivers under Texas law.

  • April 02, 2024

    Judge Notes There's No 'Jump To Conclusions' Mat In His Court

    In throwing out a lawsuit against a luxury car brand, a Delaware federal judge likened an expert report proffered by a patent litigation outfit to the absurd "Jump To Conclusions" mat from the 1999 movie "Office Space."

  • April 02, 2024

    'Road Not Taken': Uber Defends Verdict With Poetic Flair

    Making reference to Robert Frost's poem "The Road Not Taken," Uber Technologies Inc. on Monday said a group of UberBlack drivers chose their road when they urged a Pennsylvania federal court to consider less than a unanimous verdict, and could not turn back around when the jurors leaned toward declaring them independent contractors.

  • April 02, 2024

    Axle Maker Says It's Getting Shafted On Exclusive Parts Deal

    A Colorado maker of electrically powered axle components says a Michigan heavy-vehicle company broke their exclusivity agreement and is trying to replace the manufacturer with a competitor, according to a complaint removed to Colorado federal court Monday.

  • April 02, 2024

    Tesla Pushed On La. Antitrust Claims In 5th Circ.

    Tesla Inc.'s claims that Louisiana car dealers and regulators illegally excluded the direct-sale automaker from the state's market met a Fifth Circuit panel Tuesday that questioned how the case might be impacted by a Pelican State probe into the company's allegedly unlawful conduct.

  • April 02, 2024

    Transportation Department Finalizes New Train Crew Size Rule

    The U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Railroad Administration on Tuesday finalized a rule requiring freight trains to be operated with at least two people, forging ahead with a mandate long supported by rail workers' unions and safety advocates, but one that major rail carriers have decried as unnecessary and costly.

  • April 02, 2024

    CBP To Crack Down On 'Vague' Cargo Descriptions

    Importers will have a harder time bringing in shipments that aren't descriptive enough for border officials to identify following an announcement from U.S. Customs and Border Protection that the agency will issue messages advising of noncompliance.

Expert Analysis

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • The Latest Antitrust Areas For In-House Counsel To Watch

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    The U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission's increasingly aggressive approach to antitrust enforcement means in-house counsel should closely monitor five key compliance issues, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • Del.'s Tesla Pay Takedown Tells Boards What Not To Do

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    The Delaware Chancery Court’s ruthless dissection of the Tesla board’s extreme departures from standard corporate governance in its January opinion striking down CEO Elon Musk’s $55 billion pay package offers a blow-by-blow guide to mistakes Delaware public companies can avoid when negotiating executive compensation, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Aviation Back On Course, But Keep Seat Belts Fastened

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    While the airline industry finally returned to profitability last year for the first time since the onset of COVID-19, and is poised for historic levels of traffic in 2024, supply chain problems and economic and geopolitical uncertainty persist — so more turbulence may lie ahead, say Kevin Lewis and Bart Biggers at Sidley.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Standing And A Golden Rule

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Victoria Angle at MoFo examines one recent decision that clarifies the elements necessary to establish prejudice and federal claims court standing in multiphase protests, and two that exemplify a government procurements golden rule.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Brazil

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    Environmental, social and governance issues have increasingly translated into new legislation in Brazil since 2020, and in the wake of these recently enacted regulations, we are likely to see a growing number of legal disputes in the largest South American country related to ESG issues such as greenwashing if companies are not prepared to adequately adapt and comply, say attorneys at Mattos Filho.

  • Opinion

    Gilead Ruling Signals That Innovating Can Lead To Liability

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    A California appeals court's ruling last month in Gilead Life Sciences v. Superior Court of San Francisco that a drug manufacturer can be held liable for delaying the introduction of an improved version of its medication raises concerns about the chilling effects that expansive product liability claims may have on innovation, says Gary Myers at the University of Missouri School of Law.

  • Vagueness In Calif. Climate Law Makes Compliance Tricky

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    California's recently enacted Voluntary Carbon Market Disclosures Act requires companies making claims of carbon neutrality, or significant greenhouse gas emissions reductions, to disclose information supporting those claims — but vague and conflicting language in the statute poses multiple problems for businesses, say John Rousakis and Chris Bowman at O'Melveny.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Employer Lessons From Nixed Calif. Arbitration Agreement

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    A California state appeals court’s recent decision to throw out an otherwise valid arbitration agreement, where an employee claimed a confusing electronic signature system led her to agree to unfair terms, should alert employers to scrutinize any waivers or signing procedures that may appear to unconscionably favor the company, say Guillermo Tello and Monique Eginli at Clark Hill.

  • Legal Issues Loom For Driverless Trucking

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    Companies' recent experiments with driverless trucking technology herald a transformation of the logistics sector — but stakeholders must reckon with increasing regulatory scrutiny, emerging liability issues, and concerns around ethical guidelines, insurance and standardization, say Zal Phiroz at Pier Consulting Group and Nicolas Bezada at Unishippers.

  • Musk Pay Package Ruling Offers Detailed Lesson On Del. Law

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    Anat Alon-Beck and John Livingstone at Case Western Reserve University discuss the specifics that led Delaware's chancellor to rescind Elon Musk's $55.8 billion Tesla pay package on Jan. 30, how the state’s entire fairness doctrine played into the ruling, and its bigger-picture impact on the executive compensation landscape.

  • Key Maritime Law Issues In 2024: Election-Year Unknowns

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    In the final installment of this three-part article reviewing the top challenges for the maritime industry this year, Sean Pribyl at Holland & Knight examines how the uncertainty surrounding the forthcoming U.S. election may affect the maritime sector — especially companies involved in offshore wind and deep-sea mining.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

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