Trials

  • February 23, 2024

    'This Isn't MTV Unplugged': Guitar Banned At Supertramp Trial

    A California federal judge on Friday denied a request by former Supertramp member Roger Hodgson to play his guitar on the witness stand in a trial over a songwriting royalty dispute with his former bandmates, saying it isn't relevant in a breach of contract case and that the trial "isn't MTV Unplugged."

  • February 23, 2024

    No Lie In Calling A Lemon A Lemon, Jury Told At Trial's End

    At the close of a trial nearly eight years in the making, counsel for a Massachusetts woodworking shop facing claims that it bad-mouthed its machinery suppliers to others in the industry denied claims Friday that the shop's owner-operator leveled death threats during a heated dispute over a malfunctioning piece of equipment.

  • February 23, 2024

    Md. Judge Won't Toss Ex-Baltimore State's Atty's Conviction

    A Maryland federal judge has refused to acquit former Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby of lying on mortgage applications for a vacation home, rejecting her contention that charges were brought in the wrong venue and finding that prosecutors put forward sufficient evidence for a reasonable jury to find her guilty.

  • February 23, 2024

    Judge Won't Reschedule Google's Ad Tech Trial In Va.

    A Virginia federal judge refused a request from Google on Friday to reschedule a slated September trial for the U.S. Department of Justice's ad tech monopolization case, saying the tech giant can overcome a potential timing conflict for its attorneys.

  • February 23, 2024

    NRA, LaPierre Found Liable For Misconduct In $6M Verdict

    A New York jury found Friday that the National Rifle Association, longtime CEO Wayne LaPierre and two other executives improperly used donor money, among other misconduct, ordering individual defendants to repay the gun rights group a total of $6.4 million.

  • February 23, 2024

    Alec Baldwin Loss Claims Trimmed In 'Rust' Shooting Suit

    A California judge has dismissed with leave to amend loss of consortium claims against Alec Baldwin and El Dorado Pictures Inc. by the family of the cinematographer who was shot and killed on the set of "Rust," saying they had not alleged a close enough relationship to her to sustain the claims under New Mexico law.

  • February 23, 2024

    Pa. Dentist Hit With $11M Verdict In Cancer Patient's Suit

    A Pennsylvania jury has awarded an $11 million verdict to a woman who claimed her dentist failed to promptly send her for a biopsy of a sore in her mouth that eventually developed into Stage IV cancer, her attorneys announced Friday.

  • February 23, 2024

    With Interest, Trump Now Owes $454M For NY Valuation Fraud

    Donald Trump owes New York state nearly a half billion dollars after a county clerk on Friday tacked on $99 million in interest linked to a $355 million judgment in the state attorney general's civil fraud case against the former president last week.

  • February 23, 2024

    Ex-Vitol Oil Trader Convicted On FCPA Rap

    Former Vitol Oil Group trader Javier Aguilar was convicted Friday of Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and money laundering violations, after nearly two months of trial over claims that he bribed officials in Ecuador and Mexico in order to win $500 million in business deals for the global energy and commodities company.

  • February 23, 2024

    NY Clerk Defends Barring Felons From Juries In Dismissal Bid

    New York County's commissioner of jurors has urged a federal judge to dismiss a Black public defender's racial bias suit challenging the Manhattan court system's exclusion of people with felony convictions from juries, arguing the attorney fails to allege the exclusion was applied with a discriminatory motive or in a discriminatory way.

  • February 23, 2024

    Red Sox Network Exec Says 18 Mos. Enough For Billing Fraud

    A former vice president with the network that broadcasts Boston Red Sox and Boston Bruins games argued Thursday that he should spend no more than 18 months in federal prison after a jury convicted him of bilking his former employer through a phony invoice scheme.

  • February 22, 2024

    Ex-Capital One Analyst Faces 2 Years For Insider Trading

    A former Capital One data analyst was sentenced to two years in prison after pleading guilty to his role in a complex $3.1 million scheme to use his employer's credit card transaction data to guess revenue numbers public companies were poised to announce.

  • February 22, 2024

    Supertramp Royalties Deal 'Smart Move,' Doors' Manager Says

    The manager of The Doors and Jefferson Airplane testified Thursday in a California federal breach of contract trial between former Supertramp members that the songwriting royalty agreement at the center of the case looks like a "smart move" and that songwriters often share royalty proceeds with non-writing band members.

  • February 22, 2024

    Ex-Vitol Trader Denies Knowing Of Bribes, As Trial Nears End

    Counsel for a former Vitol Group executive told a New York federal jury in closing arguments Thursday that his client wasn't aware of bribes being paid to officials in Ecuador and Mexico in order to obtain $500 million in state contracts, while a prosecutor insisted that the former oil trader was the linchpin to the corruption scheme.

  • February 22, 2024

    Wash. AG Seeks $1.2M In Damages For Debt Collector's Errors

    A debt collection company should pay more than $1.2 million after it "didn't even come close to complying with the law" while recovering medical debt payments for a hospital in Washington, the state attorney general's office told a judge during a bench trial Thursday.

  • February 22, 2024

    Pool Co. Used Rival's TM To Confuse Customers, NC Jury Told

    A swimming pool equipment manufacturer is using a competitor's trademarks to try to pass off its replacement parts on Amazon as being endorsed by its rival, a North Carolina federal jury heard Thursday during opening statements of a trial in Charlotte.

  • February 22, 2024

    5th Circ. Affirms Medicare Kickback Convictions

    The Fifth Circuit upheld two Texas group-home owners' convictions and sentences for their role in a Medicare kickback scheme, rejecting their argument that a trial court judge wrongly admitted audio recordings at trial and incorrectly calculated the scheme's returns.

  • February 22, 2024

    R. Kelly Fights Chicago Child Porn Conviction At 7th Circ.

    R. Kelly's bid to unwind his conviction and 20-year sentence on child pornography and inducement charges received skepticism Thursday from one Seventh Circuit judge, who at one point warned the artist could be "worse off" by winning his appeal.

  • February 22, 2024

    Coldwell Banker Wins Trade Secrets Fight On Directed Verdict

    A California state judge issued a directed verdict for Coldwell Banker's Orange County division in a case where a rival real estate company accused it of poaching employees and stealing trade secrets.

  • February 22, 2024

    Was Armorer 'Sloppy' Or 'Scapegoat'? 'Rust' Trial Opens

    An attorney for film prop weapons expert Hannah Gutierrez-Reed told a New Mexico state jury during opening statements in her involuntary manslaughter trial Thursday that the producers of "Rust," including actor Alec Baldwin, used the young armorer as a "scapegoat" in the fatal on-set shooting of a cinematographer.

  • February 22, 2024

    $10M Crash Verdict Nixed Over Excluded Toxicology Expert

    A Texas appeals court on Thursday vacated a $10 million verdict against a truck driver in a wrongful death suit, saying the trial court wrongly excluded expert testimony about the other driver's blood alcohol content and how it could have contributed to the crash.

  • February 22, 2024

    FTC Eyes 2024 Trial For Meta Antitrust Case

    The Federal Trade Commission told a D.C. federal court its case accusing Meta Platforms Inc. of monopolizing the personal social networking market could be ready for trial later this year, despite the company saying the case is too complex to start that soon.

  • February 22, 2024

    Convicted Chicago Pol Seeks Acquittal Or New Trial

    One of Chicago's longest serving and most powerful local politicians asked an Illinois federal judge Wednesday to set aside a jury's December verdict convicting him of using his official position to steer tax business to his personal law firm, saying no rational jury could have convicted him based on the evidence presented at trial.

  • February 21, 2024

    Ex-KPMG Exec, Ex-Oversight Staffer Get Convictions Vacated

    A New York federal judge has vacated the convictions and guilty pleas of an ex-KPMG executive and a former member of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board in a scheme to use stolen confidential information to help the auditing firm get better results on audits conducted by the regulatory board.

  • February 21, 2024

    Nurses Ignored Surgery Patient's Fatal Sepsis, Fla. Jury Hears

    Nurses at Florida's Bayport Medical Center neglected a post-op patient as she developed sepsis and eventually died in the ICU, and one nurse revised notes to conceal the negligence, jurors heard in opening arguments Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • A Closer Look At Novel Jury Instruction In Forex Rigging Case

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    After the recent commodities fraud conviction of a U.K.-based hedge fund executive in U.S. v. Phillips, post-trial briefing has focused on whether the New York federal court’s jury instruction incorrectly defined the requisite level of intent, which should inform defense counsel in future open market manipulation cases, say attorneys at Lankler Siffert.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

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    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.

  • A Look Into How Jurors Reach High Damages Awards

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    In the wake of several large jury awards, Richard Gabriel and Emily Shaw at Decision Analysis shed light on challenges that jurors have in deciding them, the nonevidentiary and extra-legal methods they use to do so, and new research about the themes and jury characteristics of high-damages jurors.

  • What To Know About WDTX Standing Order For Patent Cases

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    Patent litigators should review and ensure compliance with the standing order recently issued by U.S. District Judge Alan Albright of the Western District of Texas — a popular patent litigation venue — which encompasses new deadlines, seeks to streamline discovery disputes, and further reflects the court's existing practices, says Archibald Cruz at Patterson + Sheridan.

  • 10 Lessons From A Deep Dive Into IP Damages

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    Decisions on challenging an intellectual property expert's opinion can benefit from the in-depth study of court rulings on admissibility grounds, where the findings include the fact that patent cases see the most challenges of any IP area, say Deepa Sundararaman and Cleve Tyler at Berkeley Research.

  • Managing Competing Priorities In Witness Preparation

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    There’s often a divide between what attorneys and witnesses want out of the deposition process, but litigation teams can use several strategies to resolve this tension and help witnesses be more comfortable with the difficult conditions of testifying, say Ava Hernández and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Understanding And Working With The Millennials On Your Jury

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    Every trial attorney will be facing a greater proportion of millennials on their jury, as they now comprise the largest generation in the U.S., and winning them over requires an understanding of their views on politics, corporations and damages, says Clint Townson at Townson Litigation Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • 3 Strategies For Aggressive Judgment Enforcement

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    As illustrated by the many creditors of Citgo Petroleum Corp. who may walk away empty-handed — despite the company's court-ordered sale — it is important to start investigating counterparty assets and planning for enforcement even before obtaining a judgment, says Brian Asher at Asher Research.

  • Opinion

    High Court's Gifts Problem Taints Public Corruption Cases

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    A history of U.S. Supreme Court justices failing to disclose luxurious gifts from wealthy donors coincides with a troubling line of court precedent overturning jury convictions in public corruption cases, indicating that perhaps justices aren't presently fit to be making these decisions, says Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • As Promised, IRS Is Coming For Crypto Tax Evaders

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    The IRS is fulfilling its promise to crack down on those who have neglected to pay taxes on cryptocurrency earnings, as demonstrated by recently imposed prison sentences, enforcement initiatives and meetings with international counterparts — suggesting a few key takeaways for taxpayer compliance, say attorneys at BakerHostetler.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

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