Trials

  • February 20, 2024

    How Future Litigators Are Training In A 'Flight Simulator'

    Law students who would traditionally experience only a few courtroom scenarios over a semester have begun working with programs that can provide an entire array of courtroom curveballs, thanks to large language model artificial intelligence technology.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fluoride Trial Judge Mulls 'Mixed' IQ Evidence In Closings

    A California federal judge questioned the EPA and environmental groups on studies linking fluoride exposure to lower IQs during bench trial closing arguments Tuesday, observing that there's a clear dose-response relationship at high levels of fluoride exposure, but at low levels, "the evidence is mixed — we've got evidence going both ways."

  • February 20, 2024

    VLSI Seeks Delay Of Trial On Intel Patent License Defense

    VLSI has urged a California federal judge to postpone a trial set for next month on Intel's claim that it has a license to VLSI's semiconductor patents in the multibillion-dollar dispute between the companies, saying the current trial date is "unfeasible and unfair."

  • February 20, 2024

    Ill. Cardiologist Keeps Trial Win In Med Mal Death Suit

    An Illinois state appeals court on Tuesday declined to upend a trial victory for a cardiologist and his employer in a suit alleging he misdiagnosed the severity of a heart condition in a patient who later died, saying the trial court was not wrong to allow certain defense testimony or limit the plaintiff's evidence.

  • February 20, 2024

    Angry Buyer Told Machine Seller, 'I'll Kill You All,' Jury Hears

    Counsel for an Italy-based woodworking machinery manufacturer told an Atlanta federal jury Tuesday that their client's employees had been subjected to "profanity, and insults, and actual threats of physical violence" from a disgruntled customer who claimed his company had been sold a "lemon" of a high-tech wood cutting device.

  • February 20, 2024

    Jurors' Death Penalty Views Not Tied To Race, Colo. Justices Say

    The Colorado Supreme Court on Tuesday unanimously rejected a Black man's efforts to reverse his 2008 murder conviction for a drive-by shooting, with the justices finding that prosecutors' dismissal of two Black jurors did not amount to improper racial bias.

  • February 20, 2024

    4th Circ. Orders Redo On Sony's $1B Music Piracy Damages

    Cox Communications Inc. is liable for contributing to copyright infringement against Sony Music Entertainment and others, but a Virginia federal court went too far by applying vicarious liability as well and needs to redo its $1 billion damages determination, the Fourth Circuit ruled Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    Warhol Faker Gets 37 Mos. As He Awaits Murder Trial

    A Massachusetts man who is awaiting trial for allegedly murdering his wife was sentenced Tuesday to just over three years in federal prison for a yearslong scheme to sell forged artworks purporting to be original Andy Warhol pieces.

  • February 20, 2024

    Peloton Win Brings 'Bike+' TM Suit To A Screeching Halt

    A California federal magistrate judge has tossed a trademark suit against Peloton over its "Bike+" brand, saying in her summary judgment decision that there is "no likelihood of confusion" between the interactive fitness equipment giant's product and a mobile app developed by a professional cyclist's fitness-tech company.

  • February 20, 2024

    New Yorker Writer Pans Subpoena Over Adams' Ties To Pastor

    A writer for The New Yorker said that being forced to testify about an indicted Brooklyn pastor's ties to Mayor Eric Adams would step on journalistic privilege, arguing that Manhattan federal prosecutors could instead rely on other sources.

  • February 20, 2024

    Alito 'Concerned' Jurors Can Be Axed For Religious Beliefs

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito said Tuesday he is "concerned" about the prospect of potential jurors being dismissed because of their religious beliefs, as the justices declined to hear a case in which Christian jurors were excused over their views on homosexuality.

  • February 20, 2024

    Alec Baldwin Seeks June Trial Date In 'Rust' Shooting

    Alec Baldwin's attorney urged a New Mexico judge Tuesday to set a June trial date for the actor on involuntary manslaughter charges in the shooting death of "Rust" cinematographer Halyna Hutchins.

  • February 16, 2024

    4th Circ. Won't Rethink Overturning Bid-Rigging Conviction

    The Fourth Circuit declined to reconsider a panel ruling that overturned a former Contech executive's bid-rigging conviction, despite the U.S. Department of Justice's contention that the decision flouts long-standing precedent.

  • February 16, 2024

    Boeing And Lion Air Families Spar In 7th Circ. Jury Trial Bid

    The Seventh Circuit on Friday considered whether a more than century-old law governing fatal accidents occurring over the high seas allows the two remaining victims' estates suing Boeing over the Lion Air 737 Max crash to demand a jury trial.

  • February 16, 2024

    Family Of 23-Year-Old Who Died From Ulcer Gets $30M

    A Florida state jury awarded $30 million to the family of a 23-year-old woman who died from an untreated ulcer at a Tampa hospital after finding the two doctors entrusted with her care liable for negligence.

  • February 16, 2024

    Most Courts Don't Know If Their Juries Are Fair, Report Says

    In a majority of states, it's impossible to tell whether jurors actually represent a cross-section of their community because state courts don't collect race and ethnicity data, researchers at University of California, Berkeley School of Law found in a recent report.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-Ill. Senator Admits Campaign Fund Misuse After Trial

    A former Illinois state senator has admitted using campaign funds to buy trucks and recreational vehicles, pleading guilty to all counts after a three-day bench trial.

  • February 16, 2024

    Trump Owes $355M For Fraud That 'Shocks The Conscience'

    A New York state judge on Friday found Donald Trump, his adult sons, his companies and longtime executives liable for a decadelong valuation fraud conspiracy, ordering the defendants to disgorge $364 million in ill-gotten gains to the state, plus interest, with the former president on the hook for the lion's share.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fulton DA DQ Hearing Wraps With Fight Over Privilege

    The evidentiary hearing in Georgia over whether Fulton County District Attorney Fani T. Willis should be removed from the case against former President Donald Trump and his allies has concluded for the time being, a judge said Friday after nearly seven hours of testimony.

  • February 15, 2024

    Trump Asks Justices To Give Time For DC Immunity Appeal

    Donald Trump made a final plea Thursday asking the U.S. Supreme Court to stay a D.C. Circuit panel's ruling that he is not immune from federal charges of interfering in the 2020 presidential election, slamming special counsel Jack Smith's bid to get on with the former president's trial.

  • February 15, 2024

    VLSI Asks Fed. Circ. To Halt Trial On Intel License Defense

    VLSI urged the Federal Circuit on Thursday to block a California federal court from holding a trial solely on Intel's argument that it has a license to VLSI's patents after Intel was cleared of infringement, saying the court has acted "in clear excess of its jurisdiction."

  • February 15, 2024

    Restaurant Franchise Owner Hit With $30.7M Jury Verdict

    A Dallas County, Texas, jury has returned a $30.7 million verdict against major restaurant franchise company Sun Holdings Inc. and its owner in favor of an executive who claimed they refused to pay him his fair share of profits for operating nearly 150 Popeyes eateries.

  • February 15, 2024

    IP Forecast: 'No Labels' Party Feuds With Website Over Name

    In advance of debuting candidates for its promised "Unity Ticket for 2024," third-party political group No Labels will fight next week with a website's owners who say the group's name is merely a generic phrase any candidate can use. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • February 15, 2024

    Atty Must Be Tried Alongside Ex-Hawaii DA, Feds Say

    Prosecutors have urged a federal judge not to sever a lawyer from a criminal case against former Honolulu top prosecutor Keith Kaneshiro and others, saying she was a "primary" facilitator of a prosecution-for-donations conspiracy.

  • February 15, 2024

    NRA Accuses NY AG Of Political Bias As Trial Closes

    Lawyers for the National Rifle Association and its former CEO Wayne LaPierre accused New York Attorney General Letitia James of political bias in their final trial arguments Thursday, while a government attorney said this "witch hunt" defense is merely a distraction from the gun group's misuse of charitable assets.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Considerations For Lawyer Witnesses After FTX Trial

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    Sam Bankman-Fried's recent trial testimony about his lawyers' involvement in FTX's business highlights the need for attorney-witnesses to understand privilege issues in order to avoid costly discovery disputes and, potentially, uncover critical evidence an adversary might seek to conceal, says Lawrence Bluestone at Genova Burns.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Perspectives

    Justices May Clarify Expert Witness Confrontation Confusion

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    After oral arguments in Smith v. Arizona, the U.S. Supreme Court seems poised to hold that expert witness opinions that rely on out-of-court testimonial statements for their factual basis are unconstitutional, thus resolving some of the complications created by the court’s confrontation clause jurisprudence, says Richard Friedman at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • 5 Trade Secret Developments To Follow In 2024

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    Recent cases and trends in trade secret law indicate that significant developments are likely this year, and practitioners should be anticipating their impact on the business and legal landscape, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • What's On Tap For Public Corruption Prosecutions In 2024

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    All signs point toward another year of blockbuster public corruption prosecutions in 2024, revealing broader trends in enforcement and jurisprudence, and promising valuable lessons for defense strategy, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Landmark Product Safety Prosecution May Signal Sea Change

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    U.S. v. Chu, a novel prosecution and guilty verdict of corporate executives for failing to report product defects under a consumer safety law, will certainly not be the last case of its kind, and companies will need to prepare for the government’s increasingly aggressive enforcement approach, say attorneys at Cooley.

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