Trials

  • February 16, 2024

    Trump Owes $355M For Fraud That 'Shocks The Conscience'

    A New York state judge on Friday found Donald Trump, his adult sons, his companies and longtime executives liable for a decadelong valuation fraud conspiracy, ordering the defendants to disgorge $364 million in ill-gotten gains to the state, plus interest, with the former president on the hook for the lion's share.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fulton DA DQ Hearing Wraps With Fight Over Privilege

    The evidentiary hearing in Georgia over whether Fulton County District Attorney Fani T. Willis should be removed from the case against former President Donald Trump and his allies has concluded for the time being, a judge said Friday after nearly seven hours of testimony.

  • February 15, 2024

    Trump Asks Justices To Give Time For DC Immunity Appeal

    Donald Trump made a final plea Thursday asking the U.S. Supreme Court to stay a D.C. Circuit panel's ruling that he is not immune from federal charges of interfering in the 2020 presidential election, slamming special counsel Jack Smith's bid to get on with the former president's trial.

  • February 15, 2024

    VLSI Asks Fed. Circ. To Halt Trial On Intel License Defense

    VLSI urged the Federal Circuit on Thursday to block a California federal court from holding a trial solely on Intel's argument that it has a license to VLSI's patents after Intel was cleared of infringement, saying the court has acted "in clear excess of its jurisdiction."

  • February 15, 2024

    Restaurant Franchise Owner Hit With $30.7M Jury Verdict

    A Dallas County, Texas, jury has returned a $30.7 million verdict against major restaurant franchise company Sun Holdings Inc. and its owner in favor of an executive who claimed they refused to pay him his fair share of profits for operating nearly 150 Popeyes eateries.

  • February 15, 2024

    IP Forecast: 'No Labels' Party Feuds With Website Over Name

    In advance of debuting candidates for its promised "Unity Ticket for 2024," third-party political group No Labels will fight next week with a website's owners who say the group's name is merely a generic phrase any candidate can use. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • February 15, 2024

    Atty Must Be Tried Alongside Ex-Hawaii DA, Feds Say

    Prosecutors have urged a federal judge not to sever a lawyer from a criminal case against former Honolulu top prosecutor Keith Kaneshiro and others, saying she was a "primary" facilitator of a prosecution-for-donations conspiracy.

  • February 15, 2024

    NRA Accuses NY AG Of Political Bias As Trial Closes

    Lawyers for the National Rifle Association and its former CEO Wayne LaPierre accused New York Attorney General Letitia James of political bias in their final trial arguments Thursday, while a government attorney said this "witch hunt" defense is merely a distraction from the gun group's misuse of charitable assets.

  • February 15, 2024

    Calif. Jury Clears Duplo In Trial Over MGI Printer Patents

    A California federal jury has found that Duplo USA Corp. didn't infringe any claims of MGI Digital Technology SA's printer patents it was accused of infringing and that those claims were invalid, according to a verdict made public Thursday,

  • February 15, 2024

    Judge Says Jurors Can See J&J Ads In Talc Trial

    A Florida judge on Thursday said decades-old advertisements for Johnson & Johnson baby powder are relevant to potential punitive damages in a talc trial and he would not shield jurors from seeing them, but he scolded the company for not opting for a two-part trial on liability and punitive damages.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ex-Employer Blasts Lewis Brisbois Partner's Immunity Claim

    A Houston lawyer and his firm, Berg & Androphy, are urging a Texas state court to reject an attempt by a former employee and current partner with Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP to avoid $457,190 in potential sanctions for allegedly harassing Berg & Androphy with years of legal fights over back wages.

  • February 15, 2024

    Chancery Nixes Most Of Frank Founder's $835K Fee Demand

    The indicted founder of student financial planning venture Frank may not "shoehorn" new legal fee claims into a May 2023 court order that JPMorgan Chase Bank NA pay her defense on charges that she defrauded the bank when it bought her startup for $175 million in 2021, Delaware's Court of Chancery has ruled.

  • February 15, 2024

    Petition Watch: Classes, Litigation Changes & Fraud Theories

    The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of petitions for review each term, but only a few make the news. Here, Law360 looks at four petitions filed in the past three weeks that you might've missed, including questions over how courts should analyze class certification bids and regulations restricting specific speech for content-neutral reasons, whether plaintiffs must reestablish standing after amending lawsuits, and what constitutes fraud.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ga. Jury Convicts PPP Fraudsters In $11M Case

    A Georgia federal jury found a man and woman guilty on Thursday of involvement in a sprawling Paycheck Protection Program loan fraud scheme that defrauded the government of more than $11 million.

  • February 15, 2024

    Trump Prosecutor Blasts DQ Bid: 'Contrary To Democracy'

    Fulton County, Georgia, District Attorney Fani Willis delivered fiery testimony Thursday during a hearing seeking to have her office removed from the election interference case of Donald Trump and his allies, forcefully denying an improper relationship with a special prosecutor tapped for the high-profile case.

  • February 15, 2024

    1st Circ. Says Atty's Absence No Reason To Toss RICO Case

    The First Circuit has said a Boston federal judge's decision to dismiss a civil racketeering lawsuit after the plaintiff's counsel missed a hearing was an unwarranted rush to the "draconian sanction," which should be reserved for more extreme misconduct.

  • February 15, 2024

    Trump Gets March 25 Trial Date In NY Hush Money Case

    The Manhattan district attorney's hush money case against Donald Trump is on track to be the first of the former president's four criminal matters to go to trial, after a state judge on Thursday denied his motion to dismiss the charges and confirmed a March 25 date for jury selection.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Top Court Weighs Weinstein's 'Prior Bad Acts' Evidence

    New York's highest court asked tough questions of all sides as they heard former Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein's appeal of his rape conviction Wednesday, focusing on whether it was fair to present accusations of uncharged crimes to the jury.

  • February 14, 2024

    Telecom Confusion Caused $56M Damages, Conn. Judge Told

    A telecommunications company's confusion about bankruptcy law played a key role in the disintegration of a contract for Los Angeles telephone switching equipment and related telecom services, a company seeking $56 million told a Connecticut state judge on Wednesday as a bench trial kicked off in the 14-year-old case.

  • February 14, 2024

    Nokia Exposure Over $23M Oral Deal Won't Be Clear Until Trial

    A federal judge said Wednesday she won't decide until trial what framework a jury will use to decide damages in a New Hampshire telecom's case against Nokia over an alleged breach of a 2017 oral contract to integrate noise-filtering technology into Nokia's cell networks.

  • February 14, 2024

    March Trial Set For Samsung Claims Against Ex-IP Attys

    A Texas federal judge has backed a magistrate judge's recommendation to resolve Samsung's claims of misconduct against two of its former in-house intellectual property attorneys through a bench trial.

  • February 14, 2024

    Man 'Knew The Shit Was Wrong,' Jury Told As Fraud Trial Ends

    Federal prosecutors hoping to score convictions in a vast pandemic loan fraud operation told jurors on Wednesday that not only had an Atlanta man on trial worked with the scheme's ringleader to file loan applications with forged tax records, but admitted to the FBI that he "knew the shit was wrong" all along.

  • February 14, 2024

    Trump Prosecutor Asks Justices To Pass On Immunity Issue

    Special counsel Jack Smith urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday to reject former President Donald Trump's request for a stay of his federal election interference case, arguing that there's no merit to Trump's "radical claim" he is immune from prosecution, and that the public deserves a prompt verdict.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Suggests LaPierre Owes Millions As NRA Trial Ends

    New York state attorneys on Wednesday scrutinized former National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre's testimony that he rectified all his improper spending by repaying $1 million to the gun group, pointing out that LaPierre racked up nearly $13 million in charges for private jet travel alone.

  • February 14, 2024

    BCLP Can Fight Atlanta Firm's Fee Garnishing Request

    Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP can now appeal a trial court's ruling ordering the firm to return just over $125,000 in connection to a dispute between an Atlanta attorney and an airport travel spa operator, a Georgia state appellate court ruled Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Ga. Appeal Shows Benefits Of Questioning Jury Instructions

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    A Georgia Court of Appeals’ October decision, holding a trial court erred in using pattern jury instructions that refer to a long-repealed standard of evidence, underscores the importance of scrutinizing language in established jury instructions and seizing the opportunity to push back against outdated patterns, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • How Social Media Can Affect Trial Outcomes

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    With social media’s ability to seize upon an issue and spin it into a specifically designed narrative, it is more critical than ever that a litigation communications strategy be part of trial planning to manage the impact of legal action on a company's reputation, say Sean Murphy and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Young Thug Case Spotlights Debate Over Lyric Admissibility

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    A Georgia court’s recent ruling, allowing prosecutors to use some of rapper Young Thug’s lyrics in his conspiracy trial, captures the ongoing debate about whether rap lyrics are admissible, with courts often stretching the boundaries of the federal evidence rules, say Amy Buice at Smith Gambrell and Emily Ward at Continuum Legal Group.

  • Opinion

    Prosecutors Must Choose Wisely When Enforcing Rule Of Law

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    When considering charging a person for a crime, prosecutors must choose when to enforce the rule of law, and comparing the Donald Trump election case with the gun and drug charges against Hunter Biden can teach a lot about deciding which cases to pursue, says former Connecticut judge Thomas Moukawsher.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • A Look At DOJ's New Nationwide Investment Fraud Approach

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    Investment fraud charges are increasingly being brought in unlikely venues across the country, and the rationale behind the U.S. Department of Justice's approach could well be the heightened legal standards in connection with prosecuting investment fraud, says Jonathan Porter at Husch Blackwell.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling May Beget Fraud Jury Instruction Appeals

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Greenlaw decision, disapproving disjunctive fraudulent-intent jury instructions, will likely spawn appeals in mail, wire and securities fraud cases, but defendants must show that their deception furthered ends other than taking the victim's property, says Charles Fowler at McKool Smith.

  • Opinion

    Time To Ban Deferred Prosecution For Fatal Corporate Crime

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    As illustrated by prosecutors’ deals with Boeing and other companies, deferred prosecution agreements have strayed far from their original purpose, and Congress must ban the use of this tool in cases where corporate misconduct has led to fatalities, says Peter Reilly at Texas A&M University School of Law.

  • Questions Awaiting Justices In 'Repugnant' Verdicts Hearing

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    In McElrath v. Georgia, the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the double jeopardy clause bars retrial when a jury reaches a so-called repugnant, or logically contradictory, verdict — with the ultimate resolution resting on how this narrow issue is framed, say Brook Dooley and Cody Gray at Keker Van Nest.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 1st Tax Easement Convictions Will Likely Embolden DOJ, IRS

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    After recent convictions in the first criminal tax fraud trial over allegedly abusive syndicated conservation easements, the IRS and U.S. Department of Justice will likely pursue other promoters for similar alleged conspiracies — though one acquittal may help attorneys better evaluate their clients' exposure, say Bill Curtis and Lauren DeSantis-Then at Polsinelli.

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