Trials

  • February 14, 2024

    Ex-Cognizant Execs Fight Co.'s Bid To Shield Bribe Evidence

    Two former Cognizant executives have called on a New Jersey federal court to reject the company's attempt to shield evidence related to a purported bribe as the executives face a criminal trial over a separate bribery scheme.

  • February 14, 2024

    Conn. Justices Suspect Sleepy Juror Will Wake Up Murder Case

    The Connecticut Supreme Court was skeptical Wednesday of the state prosecutor's position that a judge was entirely blameless for apparently allowing a juror in a murder trial to sleep for more than an hour, and then letting the case proceed to a conviction after taking little action on the matter.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ex-Atty Can't Delay Prison Amid Pot Bribe Appeal, Judge Says

    A Boston federal judge on Wednesday shot down a former Massachusetts attorney's request to put off his 24-month prison sentence while appealing his conviction for bribing a local police chief to boost his client's retail cannabis application.

  • February 13, 2024

    Fluoride Can Harm Brain, EPA Scientist Says As Trial Wraps

    The government wrapped its defense Tuesday in a California federal bench trial over environmental groups' efforts to ban fluoride in America's drinking water, with the government's final witness acknowledging under cross-examination that fluoride is capable of causing "neurodevelopmental harm."

  • February 13, 2024

    'She Didn't Ask, And I Didn't Tell,' Ex Says Of Fraud Scheme

    Both federal prosecutors and defense counsel for a Georgia woman accused of using her small business to hide hundreds of thousands of dollars in illegally obtained pandemic loans agreed Tuesday that her ex-husband was not just a philanderer, but a fraudster to boot.

  • February 13, 2024

    Expert's 11th-Hour Change Blocked In Pet Device IP Retrial

    A New Jersey federal judge refused Tuesday to allow an expert witness to make an 11th-hour addition to his report on the "head start" period in a new damages trial on an inventor's claim that a pet supply company misappropriated her idea for a skin medicine applicator for dogs and cats.

  • February 13, 2024

    Accused Crypto Mixer 'Key' To Online Drug Market, Gov't Says

    Bitcoin Fog laundered hundreds of millions of dollars worth of bitcoin and played a "key role" in the online drug economy, prosecutors said in an opening statement Tuesday to kick off the trial of the accused operator of the cryptocurrency mixer in D.C. federal court.

  • February 13, 2024

    AT&T, Nokia Turn To 1884 Precedent To Fight $181M Trial Loss

    AT&T and Nokia are challenging a jury verdict out of Marshall, Texas, that orders them to pay a small Utah business more than $181 million, telling a federal appeals court that paying that sum would upend important Supreme Court precedent on patent damages that dates to the late 1800s.

  • February 13, 2024

    LaPierre Defends TV Spots, Celeb Ties As NRA Trial Nears End

    Former National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre told jurors in New York state court in the final week of trial Tuesday that he went on television and rubbed elbows with celebrities not out of a desire for the spotlight but to anchor the gun group in "mainstream American culture."

  • February 13, 2024

    Ingevity Again Denied New Verdict, Trial Against $85M Loss

    A Delaware federal judge again refused Tuesday to upend BASF's $85 million jury win over Ingevity's locking up of the automobile carbon capture technology market, concluding that "substantial evidence" backs the antitrust findings.

  • February 13, 2024

    Sonos Decries California Judge's Decision To Toss $32.5M Win

    Speaker manufacturer Sonos urged the Federal Circuit to overturn a California judge's decision to throw out a $32.5 million infringement verdict Sonos won against Google and not let certain claims be tried, telling the appeals court that the judge's ruling could endanger thousands of patents.

  • February 13, 2024

    LSD Trip Didn't Cause Quadriplegia, Houston Jury Told

    An attorney for a former high school gymnast who became a quadriplegic after allegedly taking LSD compared the circumstances of the man's injuries to the hypothetical of a juror getting hit by a car on the way to the courthouse as he fought off a bid from an insurance company seeking to avoid paying a $1 million settlement connected to the man's injury.

  • February 13, 2024

    Convicted NC Doctor Can't Get Recordings From Prosecutors

    A North Carolina federal judge on Tuesday rejected a doctor's attempt to force prosecutors to turn over recorded phone calls with a telemedicine provider, finding that the requested materials weren't relevant and that she was trying to "manufacture" a way to have her fraud conviction overturned.

  • February 13, 2024

    J&J Hid Cancer Risk From Consumers, Fla. Jury Told

    Johnson & Johnson has known for decades that its baby powder contains asbestos and is linked to cancer, a Miami jury was told Tuesday in a suit seeking to hold the company liable for the death of an anesthesiologist who used the talcum powder daily for 50 years.

  • February 13, 2024

    Mass. Attys Welcome New Guardrails On Trial Time Limits

    Massachusetts attorneys largely welcomed a recent decision by the state's high court blessing time limits in certain situations in civil trials, citing the ruling's helpful guidance and limitations that will likely make ticking clocks less common in state courts than their federal counterparts.

  • February 13, 2024

    Conn. Agency Loses Sanctions Bid In Worker's Noose Suit

    A Black employee of Connecticut's energy and environmental regulator who claims he found a noose in his workplace in 2018 will not face new sanctions for deleting the alleged photo evidence, a federal judge ruled Tuesday in declining to end the hostile workplace lawsuit midtrial.

  • February 13, 2024

    Ex-Atty Appealing Pot Bribe Conviction Says Prison Can Wait

    A former Massachusetts attorney convicted over an alleged cannabis licensing quid pro quo told a Boston federal judge Tuesday that multiple close-call legal issues warrant a delay of his 24-month prison sentence until the First Circuit decides his forthcoming appeal.

  • February 13, 2024

    $8.6M In Interest Added To Vivint Smart Home TM Case

    A North Carolina federal judge has given local security company CPI Security Systems Inc. about $8.6 million in prejudgment interest in a suit against smart home software company Vivint Smart Home Inc. over allegedly deceptive marketing tactics.

  • February 12, 2024

    EPA Scientist Rips Fluoride IQ Links As 'A Lot Of Uncertainty'

    A U.S. Environmental Protection Agency scientist testifying in a California federal bench trial Monday over fluoride's risks criticized studies showing links between fluoride exposure and IQ drops, saying repeatedly there's "a lot of uncertainty" regarding the studies' data and the "evidence is weak."

  • February 12, 2024

    Man Who Laundered $30M Gets 18 Years After Fiery Hearing

    An Atlanta man was sentenced to 18 years in prison Monday for his role in a $30 million money-laundering scheme following a heated two-day hearing in which he became so argumentative that the overseeing judge reminded him he'd been a lawyer longer than the man had been alive.

  • February 12, 2024

    Oil Co. Can't Get New Injury Trial With Video Evidence

    A Texas appeals court declined Friday to let National OilWell Varco LP get a redo in a trial that resulted in a $520,000 injury verdict against it, finding that the trial court was right to exclude video evidence that was disclosed well past the discovery deadline.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ex-CEO Of Health Co. Found Guilty Of Fraud After $195M Loss

    An Illinois federal jury on Monday found the former chief executive officer of a healthcare company guilty on all 13 criminal charges brought by the federal government alleging his company tricked consumers into purchasing health insurance that didn't cover what the company promised.

  • February 12, 2024

    Gilstrap Changes Mind, Delays Netlist Trial For PTAB Order

    U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap changed his mind Saturday about allowing Netlist's infringement trial against Micron to proceed before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's review of two patents-in-suit concludes in April, noting that on further consideration, doing so would pose a risk of inefficiently spending limited judicial resources.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ex-Madigan Aide Gets 2.5 Years For Lying In Grand Jury Probe

    Former Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan's longtime chief of staff was sentenced to 30 months in federal prison Monday for lying to a grand jury that was investigating his former boss's relationship with lobbyist and confidant Michael McClain.

  • February 12, 2024

    2 Jurors Say They Were Pressured To Convict Ex-BVI Premier

    Two Florida jurors who helped convict Andrew Fahie, a former premier of the British Virgin Islands, on drug trafficking-related charges came forward shortly after they were discharged Thursday to say they were pressured to vote guilty, putting the case in what the judge called the "worst-case scenario" at a hearing Monday.

Expert Analysis

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Reconstruction-Era Laws Show Jan. 6 Cases Are Not Political

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    The renewed use of Reconstruction-era laws in indictments stemming from the Jan. 6 insurrection demonstrates that these statutes serve as a bulwark against erosion of the federal system, and provides a counterpoint to the public accusations that certain prosecutions are politically motivated, say Solomon Shinerock and Annika Conrad at Lewis Baach.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • A Closer Look At Evolving Early Release Programs

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    As the implementation of the First Step Act continues to progress and the U.S. Sentencing Commission amends its guidelines, white collar defense attorneys should understand the many mechanisms that can help reduce a client’s prison sentence early on in any case, say attorneys at Abell Eskew.

  • Teach Your Witness About 'Good' And 'Bad' Testimony Words

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    To ensure honest and accurate testimony in trials and depositions, attorneys must take care to educate their witnesses about the problematic words opposing counsel may use, such as “always” and “must,” and the effective words they can use in response, like “potentially” and “depends,” say Steve Wood and Bill Kanasky at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Unearthing The Lesser-Known 'Buried Facts' Doctrine

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    A New York federal judge’s recent suggestion that the “buried facts” doctrine may be applicable in the fraud trial of FTX cofounder Sam Bankman-Fried should serve as a reminder to attorneys in all kinds of cases involving corporate disclosures that this lesser-known rule could torpedo their defense, say Corban Rhodes and Li Yu at DiCello Levitt.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

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    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Shows Need For Proffer Terms Negotiation

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Shah decision, holding that a defendant breached his proffer agreement, illustrates why defense attorneys should insist on negotiating the terms of such agreements with prosecutors to protect their clients at trial, say attorneys at Haynes Boone.

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

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    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

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    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

  • How Law Firms Can Use Account-Based Marketing Strategies

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    Amid several evolving legal industry trends, account-based marketing can help law firms uncover additional revenue-generating opportunities with existing clients, with key considerations ranging from data analytics to relationship building, say Jennifer Ramsey at stage LLC and consultant Gina Sponzilli.

  • Strategic Succession Planning At Law Firms Is Crucial

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    Senior partners' reluctance to retire, the rise of the nonequity partner tier and generational differences in expectations are all contributing to an increasing number of departures from BigLaw, making it imperative for firms to encourage retirement among senior ranks and provide clearer leadership pathways to junior attorneys, says Laura Leopard at Leopard Solutions.

  • 2nd Circ. OT Ruling Guides On Pay For Off-The-Clock Work

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    While the Second Circuit’s recent holding in Perry v. City of New York reiterated that the Fair Labor Standards Act obligates employers to pay overtime for off-the-clock work, it recognized circumstances, such as an employee’s failure to report, that allow an employer to disclaim the knowledge element that triggers this obligation, say Robert Whitman and Kyle Winnick at Seyfarth.

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