Trials

  • February 07, 2024

    Ill. Atty's Conviction Over Embezzlement Scheme Sticks

    A former attorney who cried "wolf" over the government preventing him from adequately preparing for trial cannot unwind his conviction for misappropriating a now-shuttered bank's embezzled funds and lying about his assets, an Illinois federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • February 07, 2024

    Ill. Jury Convicts Trader Of $30M Bond Fraud

    An Illinois federal jury on Wednesday convicted a former bond trader of tanking his Atlanta-based former employer by claiming inflated commissions on his trades and entering false and unauthorized trades that caused $30 million in losses.

  • February 07, 2024

    Mass. Atty Gets 2 Years For 'Corruptly' Pushing Pot Bribe Plot

    A former Massachusetts attorney "violated his oath corruptly" by bribing a police chief with payments to his brother to win a local marijuana license for a client, a federal judge said Wednesday as he handed down a two-year prison term.

  • February 07, 2024

    Camp Lejeune Plaintiffs Can't Get Jury Trial In Water Suit

    A group of North Carolina federal judges overseeing the Camp Lejeune contaminated-water litigation have struck the plaintiffs' bid for a jury trial, finding the Camp Lejeune Justice Act does not clearly and affirmatively grant a right to a jury trial in an action against the government.

  • February 07, 2024

    Trainer Who Doped Horses Avoids Prison In Cooperation Deal

    A New York trainer who admitted drugging horses so that the outcomes of their races could be fixed avoided prison Wednesday after a Manhattan federal judge credited his extensive cooperation with prosecutors to include testifying at two trials.

  • February 07, 2024

    Alec Baldwin Trial Date Scrapped After Judge Shuffle

    Alec Baldwin's trial date in August has been nixed following a judge reassignment in the case against the actor, who is accused of involuntary manslaughter in connection with the on-set shooting death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins during the filming of "Rust" in New Mexico.

  • February 06, 2024

    Feds Say Mukasey Repping SBF, Mashinsky Possible Conflict

    Prosecutors alerted a New York federal judge Tuesday about a possible conflict stemming from Sam Bankman-Fried's recent hiring of Marc Mukasey, who also represents Celsius founder Alex Mashinsky in his criminal proceedings, noting Celsius lent money to Alameda Research, which repaid some of the loans using FTX's customer funds.

  • February 06, 2024

    Seattle Hospital Must Pay Up For 'Huge' Negligence, Jury Told

    Counsel for three families whose children had to undergo anti-fungal treatment after a Seattle hospital exposed them to mold urged a Washington state jury Tuesday to aim high on their damages award during closing arguments in a bellwether trial, citing lasting consequences that merit more than "a couple hundred thousand dollars."

  • February 06, 2024

    1st Circ. Appears Unlikely To Deflate Balloon Fraud Verdict

    A defunct Massachusetts air balloon company on Tuesday struggled to persuade the First Circuit to throw out a fraud verdict by arguing that the jury had "rubber-stamped" a judge's damages estimate.

  • February 06, 2024

    Feds' Fraud Case Based On Faulty Assumptions, Jury Hears

    A former bond trader argued Tuesday that an Illinois federal jury should clear him of accusations that he claimed inflated commissions and tanked his former employer with $30 million in losses because trial evidence proved prosecutors "jumped to conclusions" about his trades.

  • February 06, 2024

    Siemens' $13.2M Verdict Upheld In Coal Equipment Dispute

    A Florida federal judge has upheld a $13.2 million award in favor of Siemens Energy Inc. after the Eleventh Circuit revived a dispute over coal gasification equipment, saying the company wasn't being unfair in its agreement with a Canadian oilfield services business.

  • February 06, 2024

    AI Image Co. Hit With $14.1M Verdict Over Lowball Buyout

    A California federal jury returned a $14.1 million verdict Monday in favor of investors alleging AI-imaging software company ArcSoft and its billionaire CEO duped them into selling their shares for less than they were worth by hiding information about the business's success, its move to China and its eventual IPO.

  • February 06, 2024

    Ex-Pemex Exec Tells Jury Of Vitol Bribes For $200M Gas Deal

    A former executive of a unit of Mexico's state-owned oil and gas company on Tuesday told a Brooklyn federal jury of how he and a colleague agreed to accept hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes from Vitol Group, in exchange for confidential information to help the Geneva-based energy-trading giant win a $200 million gas contract.

  • February 06, 2024

    Pacira Touts Stability Upgrade In Pain Drug Patent Trial

    A novel manufacturing process that extends the shelf life of the pain reliever Exparel should extend the exclusivity period of the product's patent, Pacira BioSciences Inc. has told a New Jersey judge tasked with weighing infringement claims against generic-drug maker eVenus.

  • February 06, 2024

    Ark. Police Chief Owes $2M, City $30M In Teen Shooting Death

    An Arkansas city and its police chief owe a combined $32 million to the family of an armed teenager who was fatally shot by police in the midst of a mental health crisis, a jury has decided, finding that the chief and city are liable for failures to train and investigate. 

  • February 06, 2024

    Vivint Takes Bid To Undo $190M Trademark Verdict To 4th Circ.

    Smart home software company Vivint, saddled with a nearly $190 million verdict over allegedly deceptive marketing tactics, is taking its quest to overturn the judgment to the Fourth Circuit, following a North Carolina judge's decision to uphold the damages awarded to its competitor.

  • February 06, 2024

    DC Circ. Ruling Puts Trump In Hot Seat — And On The Clock

    In rejecting Donald Trump's absolute immunity claims in an "exhaustive" opinion Tuesday, the D.C. Circuit put significant pressure on his legal team to quickly seek U.S. Supreme Court review and avoid further delays as prosecutors look to try the former president on election interference charges before November, experts say.

  • February 06, 2024

    Mosby Guilty On One Count Of Lying For Fla. Mortgage

    A federal jury in Maryland on Tuesday found former Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby guilty of lying on mortgage applications for one of her two Florida vacation homes, but not guilty on the application for the other home.

  • February 06, 2024

    Ex-Contech Exec Asks 4th Circ. To Toss More Convictions

    The U.S. Department of Justice and the former Contech executive who was convicted of bid-rigging both agree that the Fourth Circuit should rethink the decision that wiped out that conviction, but for different reasons — one wants the conviction reinstated, while the other says the panel didn't go far enough.

  • February 06, 2024

    Water Brand Owes Over $129M For Liver Failures, Jury Finds

    A Las Vegas jury awarded more than $129 million Tuesday to five people who developed liver failure after drinking "alkalinized" Real Water, $100 million of it in punitive damages.

  • February 06, 2024

    Feds Fight Sen. Menendez's Bids To Nix Charges, Split Trials

    Federal prosecutors have asked a New York federal court to reject requests from U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez to dismiss his corruption case and to sever his trial from his wife's, arguing that the senator made "premature" factual arguments and incorrectly claimed immunity from prosecution as a senator.

  • February 06, 2024

    Ga. Justices To Review Gov't Listening To Atty-Client Calls

    The Georgia Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to hear the case of a man serving a 20-year prison sentence and seeking a new assault trial on the grounds that law enforcement officials improperly listened to three jailhouse calls between him and his lawyer.

  • February 06, 2024

    Water Co. Drivers Slam 'Out Of Touch' Bid To Ax OT Verdict

    A bottled water company's arguments that there was no evidence to support a jury's findings that it willfully violated federal overtime requirements are "out of touch" and completely rootless, a group of delivery workers told a Michigan federal judge, pushing back on the company's bid to undo their trial win.

  • February 06, 2024

    NY Judge Wants Info On Perjury Probe Of Trump Lieutenant

    A New York state judge weighing the evidence in Donald Trump's civil fraud trial demanded more information Tuesday about reports that a key trial witness, former Trump Organization Chief Financial Officer Allen Weisselberg, is facing perjury charges for his testimony in the case.

  • February 06, 2024

    'Citizen Trump' Not Beyond Accountability, Says DC Circuit

    The D.C. Circuit on Tuesday affirmed that former President Donald Trump does not have immunity from prosecution for allegedly interfering in the 2020 presidential election. 

Expert Analysis

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds Attys That CBP Can Search Devices

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent Malik v. Department of Homeland Security decision adds to the chorus of federal courts holding that border agents don’t need a warrant to search travelers’ electronic devices, so attorneys should consider certain special precautions to secure privileged information when reentering the U.S., says Jennifer Freel at Jackson Walker.

  • The Likable Witness: 6 Personality Archetypes To Cultivate

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    During pretrial witness preparation sessions, a few key methods can help identify the likable personality type a witness intuitively expresses, which can then be amplified at trial to create an emotional connection with jurors, says Gillian Drake at On Trial Associates.

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

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    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • The Likable Witness: Key Traits And Psychological Concepts

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    Though witnesses must appear credible to juries, they should also be likable in order to make an emotional connection, and certain gestural, behavioral and psychological aspects of their testimony can be modified to improve their perceived likability, says Gillian Drake at On Trial Associates.

  • How Juror Questions Are Changing Civil Trials In Texas

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    Jurors in Texas are becoming increasingly involved during civil trials by submitting written questions for the judge or attorneys to ask witnesses — and given this new reality, attorneys must understand best practices for avoiding potential pitfalls at trial and beyond, say Daniella Main and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • What Large Language Models Mean For Document Review

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    Courts often subject parties using technology assisted review to greater scrutiny than parties conducting linear, manual document review, so parties using large language models for document review should expect even more attention, along with a corresponding need for quality control and validation, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Tossed FIFA Bribery Convictions May Spur New DOJ Offense

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    After a New York federal court vacated the bribery convictions of two defendants in the U.S. Department of Justice’s sprawling FIFA probe, prosecutors may continue to pursue foreign commercial corruption through other means, albeit with some limitations, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Series

    Participating In Living History Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My role as a baron in a living history group, and my work as volunteer corporate counsel for a book series fan association, has provided me several opportunities to practice in unexpected areas of law — opening doors to experiences that have nurtured invaluable personal and professional skills, says Matthew Parker at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

  • Opinion

    Private Equity Owners Can Remedy Law Firms' Agency Issues

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    Nonlawyer, private-equity ownership of law firms can benefit shareholders and others vulnerable to governance issues such as disparate interests, and can in turn help resolve agency problems, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • Opinion

    Calif. Ruling Got It Wrong On Trial Courts' Gatekeeping Role

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    Ten years after the California Supreme Court reshaped trial judges’ role in admitting expert opinion testimony, a state appeals court's Bader v. Johnson & Johnson ruling appears to undermine this precedent and will likely create confusion about the scope of trial courts’ gatekeeping responsibility, say Robert Wright and Nicole Hood at Horvitz & Levy.

  • How Jan. 6 Riot Cases Could Affect White Collar Defendants

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    Though the prosecutions of individuals involved in the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol deal with fact patterns markedly different from white collar offenses, the emerging case law on what it means to act “corruptly” will likely pose risks and opportunities for white collar defendants and their attorneys, says Ben Jernigan at Zuckerman Spaeder.

  • How To Protect Atty-Client Privilege While Using Generative AI

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    When using generative artificial intelligence tools, attorneys should consider several safeguards to avoid breaches or complications in attorney-client privilege, say Antonious Sadek and Christopher Campbell at DLA Piper.

  • How New Lawyers Can Leverage Feedback For Growth

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    Embracing constructive criticism as a tool for success can help new lawyers accelerate their professional growth and law firms build a culture of continuous improvement, says Katie Aldrich at Fringe Professional Development.

  • Developers Are Testing Defenses In Generative AI Litigation

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    In the rapidly growing field of generative artificial intelligence law in the U.S., there are a few possible defenses that have already been effectively asserted by defendants in litigation, including lack of standing, reliance on the fair use doctrine, and the legality of so-called data scraping, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Corporate Compliance Lessons From FirstEnergy Scandal

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    Fallout from a massive bribery scheme involving Ohio electric utility FirstEnergy and state officeholders — including the recent sentencing of two defendants — has critical corporate governance takeaways for companies and individuals seeking to influence government policymaking, say attorneys at Wilson Sonsini.

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