Washington

  • February 28, 2024

    Amazon Sat On Texts In Alexa Recording Suit, Users Says

    Plaintiffs accusing Amazon of illegally recording them with Alexa devices say the tech giant kept text messages from employees out of discovery, alleging while the company claimed to have never reviewed any texts as part of the suit, a former executive admitted his devices had been scanned. 

  • February 28, 2024

    9th Circ. Says DOL Can Use Las Vegas Data For Nev. Wages

    The Ninth Circuit has said the U.S. Department of Labor was legally able to use data for a higher-paid Nevada region when it sorted out prevailing wages in the state, turning down a bid by three construction industry-related organizations to consider geographic limitations for wages.

  • February 28, 2024

    Enviro Orgs Sue EPA Over Factory Farm Water Pollution Regs

    Green groups are pushing the Ninth Circuit to revive their petition asking the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to craft new, stronger Clean Water Act regulations for the large animal feeding facilities they call "sewerless cities."

  • February 28, 2024

    Wash. Man Accused Of Killing, Selling Eagles To Plead Guilty

    One of two men accused of conspiring to kill federally protected bald eagles and golden eagles on tribal lands in northwest Montana to sell on the black market has entered a plea agreement, court records show.

  • February 28, 2024

    Alaska Airlines Says Religion Didn't Factor Into Worker Firings

    Alaska Airlines is urging a Washington federal judge to toss two Christian flight attendants' claims that they were pushed out of work due to bias against their religious beliefs by the company and their union, saying they were actually fired because they expressed their beliefs in a discriminatory manner.

  • February 28, 2024

    Seattle Convention Center's Virus Losses Not Covered

    A Seattle convention center operator is not owed coverage for pandemic-related business interruption losses, a Washington federal judge ruled, finding that although the governor's emergency pandemic proclamations prohibited access to the convention center, they weren't issued because of physical loss or damage to the property.

  • February 27, 2024

    Amazon Hit With Copyright Suit Over 'Road House' Reboot

    The writer behind the 1989 movie "Road House" sued Amazon Studios LLC on Tuesday in California federal court, alleging the company ignored his copyright for the screenplay and rushed to finish the movie before the rights reverted to him by using artificial intelligence.

  • February 27, 2024

    CARES Act Not For Violent Tenants, Court Says, Creating Split

    A Washington appellate panel said Monday that the CARES Act eviction notice only applies to tenants who are late on rent, not when landlords want to quickly oust violent tenants, in an opinion that differs from a recent ruling from another state appellate panel.

  • February 27, 2024

    Wash. Judge Asks If COVID 'Fire Sale' Should Impact Tax Plan

    A Seattle city attorney asked a Washington state appeals court on Tuesday to let the city keep a $160 million special property tax in place to fund waterfront improvements, as one judge questioned during oral arguments whether diminished property values post-pandemic should make the city recalculate the tax.

  • February 27, 2024

    Wash. Judges Likely To Let Public Defender Keep Workplace Win

    A King County public defender who won a $7 million workplace harassment judgment against her bosses after she was stalked by a client found a receptive appeals panel Tuesday, as the Washington state judges pressed the county to explain how they could unwind a jury's factual findings.

  • February 27, 2024

    Netflix Keeps Win Over '13 Reasons' Suicide Suit At 9th Circ.

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Tuesday refused to revive a proposed class action alleging Netflix Inc. contributed to a spike in child suicides by pushing its "13 Reasons Why" series about a young girl's suicide onto vulnerable teenagers, saying the lead plaintiff's estate waited too long to sue.

  • February 27, 2024

    Salmon Fishing Mitigation Effort Is Absent, Green Group Says

    Conservation group Wild Fish Conservancy told the Ninth Circuit the district court did not abuse its discretion in "narrowly partially vacating" an incidental take statement underpinning a Chinook salmon troll fishery in southeast Alaska, saying the overarching biological opinion is inconsistent with the Endangered Species Act.

  • February 27, 2024

    Vape Supplier Asks 9th Circ. To Toss $892K Award

    A vape company that supplies products for use with cannabis is asking the Ninth Circuit to overturn a district court decision affirming an $892,000 arbitration award against it in a distributor's contract dispute, saying the district court ignored evidence of fraud.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ore. City Urges High Court To Revive Homeless Camp Ban

    An Oregon city urged the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a Ninth Circuit ruling that its ban on camping in public spaces violated homeless residents' Eighth Amendment rights, arguing that the court's ruling impermissibly immunizes some conduct from all punishment.

  • February 27, 2024

    New Fuel Terminals Ban Doesn't Discriminate, Judge Says

    An Oregon federal judge has recommended the dismissal of a lawsuit in which Montana and a collection of fuel industry groups are challenging a ban on new oil and gas terminals in Portland, Oregon, saying there's no evidence the ban unconstitutionally discriminates against out-of-state companies.

  • February 26, 2024

    Amazon Loses Round In Suit Over Subscription Renewals

    Amazon must face claims in a proposed class action that its automatic renewal for Prime, Kindle and other services violates California and Oregon consumer laws, according to a Washington federal judge who said Monday that it was unclear if the retail giant did enough to make it easy to cancel after a free trial.

  • February 26, 2024

    Clement, Prelogar Odd Bedfellows In Social Media Showdown

    After GOP-led states targeted perceived stifling of conservative voices on social media, Monday's oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court could have featured predictable partisan fissures. But the case instead illustrated that legal ideology in the digital age is sometimes surprising.

  • February 26, 2024

    EPA Must Act On Failed Skagit River Temps Plan, Tribe Says

    The Swinomish Indian Tribal Community said it plans to sue the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for Endangered Species Act violations unless it revisits a failed Washington state plan to address high water temperatures in the Lower Skagit River Basin that are harming protected salmon species.

  • February 26, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Affirms Freshub Didn't Lie To Revive Patent App

    The Federal Circuit on Monday upheld a Texas federal court's ruling that Amazon's Alexa voice assistant didn't infringe voice-processing system patents owned by Freshub and that Freshub didn't use nefarious means to obtain those patents.

  • February 26, 2024

    Don't Nix Cash App Referral Text Suit, Consumer Says

    Cellphone users alleging mobile payment service Cash App bombarded them with "annoying and harassing spam texts" have told a Seattle federal judge that Cash App's parent company shouldn't be allowed to escape their suit, pointing to recent and "nearly identical" claims against trading app Robinhood that survived a dismissal bid and subsequently settled for a proposed $9 million.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Say Social Media Speech Laws Pose 'Land Mines'

    The U.S. Supreme Court seemed skeptical Monday of the constitutionality of Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on viewpoint, but struggled with whether the still-developing records in the lawsuits challenging the regulations could support a meaningful ruling on platforms' First Amendment rights.

  • February 26, 2024

    9th Circ. Revives Horse Owner's Civil Rights Suit Over Name

    The Ninth Circuit on Monday reinstated Jerry Jamgotchian's constitutional challenge against the California Horse Racing Board's decision refusing to let his horse Malpractice Meuser compete in a race in 2022, noting that the board's decision didn't block Jamgotchian from pursuing constitutional claims in federal court since the board lacked jurisdiction to decide such claims.

  • February 26, 2024

    Timeshare Settlement Can't Stop Additional Consumer Suit

    A Washington marketing firm must face negligent misrepresentation and consumer protection claims over links to a timeshare-exit company, according to a Washington federal judge who ruled that a group of consumers seeking refunds are not barred from suing because of a settlement in another case.

  • February 26, 2024

    Hydroelectric Co. Asks For Pause On Puyallup Dam Order

    A hydroelectric company appealing to the Ninth Circuit is asking a Washington federal judge to stay an order that directed it to remove part of a temporary rock dam on the Puyallup River, saying the order would require it to make changes that are likely to damage its facility.

  • February 26, 2024

    Wash. Atty Disbarred Over Unrefunded Client Fees

    A Washington employment attorney who collected tens of thousands of dollars in fees from numerous clients whose legal work she never completed has been forced to give up her law license.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Potential Defendant Strategies Amid Calif. Privacy Questions

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    Although the current case law surrounding the California Consumer Privacy Act is in its infancy, courts have begun addressing important issues related to the notice-and-cure provisions of the statute, and these decisions show defendant-businesses would be wise to assert their notice rights early and repeatedly, say Viola Trebicka and Dan Humphrey at Quinn Emanuel.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

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    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Workplace Speech Policies Limit Legal And PR Risks

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    As workers increasingly speak out on controversies like the 2024 elections and the Israel-Hamas war, companies should implement practical workplace expression policies and plans to protect their brands and mitigate the risk of violating federal and state anti-discrimination and free speech laws, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • 10 Years Of Retail Battles: Unpacking Pricing Litigation Trends

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    A close look at a decade of pricing class actions against retailers reveals evolving trends, plaintiffs bar strategies, and the effects of significant court decisions across states, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • How Consumer Product Cos. Can Keep Up With Class Actions

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    Recent cases show California's federal courts and the Ninth Circuit remain the preferred arena for consumers pursuing false advertising and trade deception claims against companies — so manufacturers, distributors and retailers of consumer products should continue to watch these courts for guidance on how to fight class actions, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

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