White Collar

  • March 28, 2024

    11th Circ. Affirms SEC Denial Of Whistleblower Award

    An Eleventh Circuit panel has affirmed the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's denial of a whistleblower award to John Meisel, who argued he was entitled to one after providing the commission with information used to obtain $18 million in judgments against the perpetrators of a Ponzi scheme.

  • March 28, 2024

    Disbarring Jeffrey Clark Would Chill Gov't Dialogue, Prof Says

    A Yale Law School professor said Thursday that he does not believe former U.S. Department of Justice attorney Jeffrey Clark should face punishment for advocating to send a letter to Georgia officials purporting to identify significant concerns with the 2020 election, testifying before a Washington, D.C., attorney ethics panel that such discipline would devastate free dialogue within government agencies.

  • March 28, 2024

    Implant Maker's Bribe Case Ripe For Trimming, Judge Says

    A money laundering charge levied against implant manufacturer SpineFrontier Inc. and its executives may be dropped from the broader bribery and kickback prosecution as a Boston federal judge Thursday struggled to square up how the company could have allegedly concealed the unlawful transfers to surgeons while also disclosing them publicly.

  • March 28, 2024

    Doctor Allowed To Withdraw NBA Fraud Plea, Gets June Trial

    A Manhattan federal judge will allow a Seattle-area doctor to pull back his guilty plea and go to trial in June, against prosecutors' objections, in a case alleging he assisted a cohort of retired NBA players to create fake invoices to submit to the league's healthcare plan.

  • March 28, 2024

    Commodities Trader Trafigura To Pay $126M For Brazil Bribes

    Switzerland-based Trafigura Beheer BV on Thursday agreed to pay $126 million and admitted to bribing Brazilian government officials in order to obtain business with state oil company Petrobras, becoming the latest global commodities trader to settle with U.S. prosecutors over Latin American corruption.

  • March 28, 2024

    Grading Garland: Attys Give AG Mixed Reviews 3 Years In

    U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland's name won't be on the ticket in November, but his performance three years into his tenure is a subplot in the 2024 presidential election.

  • March 28, 2024

    Romney Tells DEA Pot Review Must Heed Treaty Obligations

    Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, on Wednesday expressed skepticism about federal health regulators' recommendation to loosen marijuana restrictions and pressed the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to explain how it would consider the drug's status in light of U.S. treaties.

  • March 28, 2024

    Bankman-Fried Gets 25 Years For 'Very Bad Bet' Of FTX Fraud

    FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried was sentenced Thursday to 25 years in prison for stealing more than $11 billion from customers, investors and lenders of his now-collapsed cryptocurrency empire, with a Manhattan federal judge saying the infamous risk-taker "made a very bad bet about the likelihood of getting caught."

  • March 27, 2024

    Hunter Biden Judge Doubts Tax Charges Politically Motivated

    A California federal judge Wednesday appeared unpersuaded by Hunter Biden's claim that the special counsel's decision to file criminal tax charges after a plea deal collapsed was motivated by pressure from Republican lawmakers, remarking that "there really is no evidence to support that contention."

  • March 27, 2024

    No New Trial For Hedge Fund Boss In Forex Rigging Case

    A New York federal judge on Friday refused to acquit or call for a new trial for a U.K.-based hedge fund chief convicted of illegally manipulating a currency exchange rate, rejecting his argument that his alleged conduct lacked sufficient ties to the United States.

  • March 27, 2024

    9th Circ. Revives Claims Against Apple In Crypto Theft Row

    The Ninth Circuit on Wednesday partially reinstated a putative class action accusing Apple of misrepresenting the safety of its App Store after users' cryptocurrency was stolen from an app, finding that while a federal tech immunity law shielded Apple from an array of fraud and wiretapping claims, three consumer protection claims could move forward. 

  • March 27, 2024

    Evidence On Ex-Mozambique Official Stays In $2B Fraud Suit

    A former Mozambique finance minister can't keep evidence from his phone out of a case alleging his involvement in a $2 billion scheme to siphon government-backed project funds from that country after a federal judge in Brooklyn on Wednesday backed the phone's seizure and search.

  • March 27, 2024

    DOJ, SEC Looking At Chemours After Internal Accounting Probe

    The Chemours Co. said on Wednesday that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice have launched a probe into the chemical company after an internal review revealed that former executives engaged in unethical accounting practices.

  • March 27, 2024

    Merger News Boosts Rivals, 'Shadow Trading' Jury Told

    Medivation's 2016 sale announcement would have an expected positive "spillover effect" on rival Incyte's stock price, a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission expert testified Wednesday in a "shadow trading" trial over claims an ex-Medivation executive exploited confidential news of his company's imminent acquisition to buy shares in the competitor.

  • March 27, 2024

    Minor League Players Charged With Insider Trading

    California federal prosecutors have hit current and former minor league baseball players with claims they made profits totaling over $162,000 trading off insider information about burger chain Jack in the Box's $575 million acquisition of its fellow chain Del Taco.

  • March 27, 2024

    Justices Poised To Expand Repeat Offenders' Jury Trial Rights

    The U.S. Supreme Court appeared likely Wednesday to agree with the Biden administration and the criminal defense bar that repeat offenders have a constitutional right to let a jury decide if past offenses were sufficiently distinct to trigger lengthy prison terms under a prominent sentencing enhancement.

  • March 27, 2024

    SD Gov. Seeks Federal Funds Audit Of Tribal Law Enforcement

    South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem has asked President Joe Biden's administration to conduct a thorough audit of federal funding for the state's nine Native American tribes, saying additional law enforcement resources are urgently needed on reservation lands.

  • March 27, 2024

    SEC Wins Nearly $1M Against Penny Stock Influencer

    A California man who used his large social media following to manipulate penny stock prices has been ordered to pay more than $917,000 by a federal judge who said the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission proved the influencer committed fraud by failing to tell his followers he was selling off the very same stocks he was urging them to buy. 

  • March 27, 2024

    Energy Co. Origis Exits Investor Suit Over Devalued Shares

    Renewable energy company Origis USA Inc. has escaped a suit by former shareholders after a New York federal judge concluded that the plaintiffs failed to show that the company was privy to an alleged scheme by its now-former CEO to induce them to sell their stakes for considerably less than the $1.4 billion they were later sold for.

  • March 27, 2024

    Cannabis Caucus Dems Urge Garland To Restore Pot Protections

    The two Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives' Congressional Cannabis Caucus blasted Attorney General Merrick Garland on Wednesday for not reissuing "overdue" protections for marijuana businesses acting in compliance with state and tribal law.

  • March 27, 2024

    The Ohtani-Shaped Cloud Looming Over The MLB Season

    Major League Baseball opens its season in an awkward position Thursday, with Los Angeles Dodgers superstar Shohei Ohtani at the margins of a still-unfolding gambling scandal that may have limited legal blowback, but will nevertheless present existential questions for the league.

  • March 27, 2024

    Sotomayor 'Annoyed' By Supreme Court's Focus On History

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor seemed to release some pent-up frustration Wednesday over the court's increasing focus on history and tradition when reviewing constitutional disputes, suggesting the method frequently used by the court's more conservative members isn't foolproof.

  • March 27, 2024

    PwC Hiding Key Details Of Tax Scandal, Aussie Senate Says

    PwC is hiding key details from investigators about its partners marketing confidential drafts of tax laws to top U.S. firms, waited years to review the matter internally and does not appear capable of making substantive reforms, an Australian Senate committee said Wednesday.

  • March 27, 2024

    Imprisoned Bitcoin Fraudster Fights Loss Amount At 7th Circ.

    A Nigerian man serving eight years in prison for carrying out an $8 million bitcoin fraud scheme told the Seventh Circuit on Wednesday that he should be resentenced because a lower court incorrectly considered $46 million in intended losses while determining his sentencing range.

  • March 27, 2024

    Ex-NJ Corrections Officer Admits To Scamming $600K

    A former New Jersey corrections officer has admitted to orchestrating two fraud schemes, including an alleged cryptocurrency scam that resulted in losses of more than $600,000, the U.S. attorney for New Jersey has announced.

Expert Analysis

  • 2 FCPA Settlements Illuminate Self-Disclosure, Disgorgement

    Author Photo

    Two of last year’s Foreign Corrupt Practices Act settlements — with biomedical company Lifecore and mining company Corsa Coal — suggest that the government will be much more flexible in negotiating disgorgement amounts if an entity voluntarily self-discloses misconduct, say Michael Gilbert and Lucas Amodio at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Opinion

    Anti-Kickback Statute Does Not Require But-For Causation

    Author Photo

    A proper interpretation of the Anti-Kickback Statute clearly indicates that but-for causation is not required for False Claims Act Liability, and courts that hold otherwise will make it significantly easier for fraudsters to avoid accountability, says Kenneth Capesius at Baron & Budd.

  • A Closer Look At The Federal Criminal Enforcement Slump

    Author Photo

    Former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, now at King & Spalding, explains that the U.S. Department of Justice’s statistical reports reveal that federal authorities are considerably less productive today than in the past, as criminal prosecutions fell in 2022 in every major category, for reasons that are not entirely clear.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

    Author Photo

    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • Lessons From DOJ's Handling Of Rare Medicare Fraud Case

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent indictment against HealthSun sheds light on the relatively rare circumstances in which the agency may pursue criminal charges for fraud involving Medicare Advantage, but its subsequent decision not to prosecute shows that compliance efforts can mitigate penalties, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • 5 Securities Litigation Issues To Watch In 2024

    Author Photo

    There is yet another exciting year ahead for securities litigation, starting with the U.S. Supreme Court hearing argument next week in a case presenting a key securities class action question that has eluded review for the last eight years, say attorneys at Willkie.

  • Expect National Security Scrutiny Of Higher Ed To Continue

    Author Photo

    In 2023, the federal government significantly elevated the national security responsibilities of academic communities, so universities and research laboratories should take a more rigorous approach to research partnerships, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Anti-Money Laundering Compliance Must Put Officers On Alert

    Author Photo

    Recent government actions against FTX and other crypto companies have put a laser focus on corporate compliance failures, with added pressure on compliance officers — making the need for personal risk assessment particularly acute given today's novel anti-money laundering issues, say Poppy Alexander at Constantine Cannon and Caleb Hayes-Deats at MoloLamken.

  • What To Know About FCA Cybersecurity Enforcement

    Author Photo

    Now is a good time for practitioners, government contractors and potential relators to review recent developments in cybersecurity-related False Claims Act enforcement, and consider best practices for navigating this space in the new year, say Ellen London at London & Stout, and Li Yu and Molly Knobler at DiCello Levitt.

  • Opinion

    Stronger Attorney Rules Are Needed To Avoid A Jan. 6 Repeat

    Author Photo

    Given the key role lawyers played in the events leading up to the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection, the legal profession must shore up its rules before this year’s presidential election to make clear that lawyers who undermine the rule of law will face severe penalties, including disbarment, says Ray Brescia at Albany Law School.

  • What One Litigator Learned Serving On A Jury

    Author Photo

    Kilpatrick attorney April Isaacson shares insights for trial lawyers from her recent experience serving on a jury for the first time, including lessons about the impact of frequent sidebars, considerations for using demonstratives, the importance of clear jury instructions, and the unconscious habits that can drive jurors mad.

  • 4 Legal Ethics Considerations For The New Year

    Author Photo

    As attorneys and clients reset for a new year, now is a good time to take a step back and review some core ethical issues that attorneys should keep front of mind in 2024, including approaching generative artificial intelligence with caution and care, and avoiding pitfalls in outside counsel guidelines, say attorneys at HWG.

  • Bribery Settlement Gives Insight On DOJ Policies

    Author Photo

    Chemical company Albemarle’s recent $218 million settlement with the government to resolve foreign bribery claims provides valuable data points for companies on the U.S. Department of Justice’s voluntary self-disclosure policy and its clawback pilot program, say Michael DeBernardis and Tiauna Mathieu at Hughes Hubbard.

  • SEC Case May Expand Scope Of Insider Trading Liability

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's first-of-its-kind enforcement action against an individual in a case involving "shadow trading" demarcates an expansion of insider trading liability to circumstances in which there is a market connection between the source of information and the issuer of the securities traded, say attorneys at Steptoe.

  • Securities Question Stands After Contradicting Crypto Rulings

    Author Photo

    The debate about the regulation of crypto-assets came to a head in 2023 when two New York federal judges came to opposite conclusions about whether crypto-assets were securities by using the Howey test, highlighting the uncertainty facing the crypto industry as it seeks to resolve definitional questions, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the White Collar archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!