White Collar

  • February 14, 2024

    Epstein Survivors Say FBI's 'Botched' Probes Allowed Abuse

    Twelve survivors of sexual predator Jeffrey Epstein claim the FBI failed to investigate numerous allegations that he was trafficking and sexually assaulting young women and children, allowing the abuse to continue for more than two decades, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday in New York federal court.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Top Court Weighs Weinstein's 'Prior Bad Acts' Evidence

    New York's highest court asked tough questions of all sides as they heard former Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein's appeal of his rape conviction Wednesday, focusing on whether it was fair to present accusations of uncharged crimes to the jury.

  • February 14, 2024

    9th Circ. Open To Rebooting Suit Over Apple App Crypto Theft

    A Ninth Circuit panel appeared open Wednesday to reviving a putative class action alleging Apple misrepresented the safety of its App Store after users' cryptocurrency was stolen from an app, with two judges questioning why the allegations can't survive when Apple has consistently touted its security in separate antitrust litigation.

  • February 14, 2024

    FinCEN Head Vows No 'Gotcha' Enforcement Of New Rules

    The director of the U.S. Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network said during a Wednesday congressional hearing that the agency is not pursuing "gotcha" enforcement when it comes to companies complying with new rules for reporting their beneficial ownership information.

  • February 14, 2024

    San Francisco's Ankle Monitor Rules Put On Hold

    A federal judge in California has halted the San Francisco Sheriff's Office from enforcing rules that forced criminal defendants released pretrial under electronic monitoring to agree to be subjected to warrantless and suspicionless searches at any time and allow their GPS data to be shared among law enforcement agencies, court documents show.

  • February 14, 2024

    First Purely Tax Crypto Indictment Signals More On Tap

    Federal prosecutors' first public indictment of an individual who underreported the capital gains from a nearly $4 million legal sale of bitcoin indicates that authorities have opened the floodgates for more criminal cases that deal purely with undisclosed gains on legitimate cryptocurrency transactions.

  • February 14, 2024

    Debt Box Calls SEC Dismissal Bid 'Gambit' To Avoid Sanctions

    Crypto project Debt Box urged a Utah federal judge Wednesday to deny the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's motion to dismiss the controversial enforcement action against it for now, calling the action a "gambit" from the regulator to avoid potential sanctions and a permanent dismissal over alleged misconduct.

  • February 14, 2024

    Fund Administrator Negligent In $9M Fraud, NC Justices Told

    A group of investors who were fleeced for nearly $9 million by a crooked hedge fund manager urged the North Carolina Supreme Court Wednesday to revive their negligence suit against the fund's administrator, arguing it blindly accepted whatever the manager said without verifying whether his investments were legitimate.

  • February 14, 2024

    OECD Chief Claims No Knowledge Of Aussie PwC Breaches

    The OECD's top official had no knowledge of PwC Australia's breaches of confidentiality when he took equity in its former CEO's consulting firm that he relinquished when the existence of the equity became public knowledge, his spokesperson told Law360.

  • February 14, 2024

    Man 'Knew The Shit Was Wrong,' Jury Told As Fraud Trial Ends

    Federal prosecutors hoping to score convictions in a vast pandemic loan fraud operation told jurors on Wednesday that not only had an Atlanta man on trial worked with the scheme's ringleader to file loan applications with forged tax records, but admitted to the FBI that he "knew the shit was wrong" all along.

  • February 14, 2024

    Trump Prosecutor Asks Justices To Pass On Immunity Issue

    Special counsel Jack Smith urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday to reject former President Donald Trump's request for a stay of his federal election interference case, arguing that there's no merit to Trump's "radical claim" he is immune from prosecution, and that the public deserves a prompt verdict.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ex-US Diplomat Pleads Not Guilty To Spying For Cuba

    A diplomat who served on the National Security Council during the Clinton administration and as U.S. ambassador to Bolivia entered a not guilty plea Wednesday to charges that he secretly acted as an agent of the Cuban government for decades.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Suggests LaPierre Owes Millions As NRA Trial Ends

    New York state attorneys on Wednesday scrutinized former National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre's testimony that he rectified all his improper spending by repaying $1 million to the gun group, pointing out that LaPierre racked up nearly $13 million in charges for private jet travel alone.

  • February 14, 2024

    Retirement Plan Funds Get Partial Thaw During DOL Probe

    Hundreds of retirement and profit-sharing plans will be allowed to find new management amid the U.S. Department of Labor's investigation into allegations their previous administrator improperly shuffled and may have embezzled millions of dollars from 17 of them, a Pennsylvania federal judge said Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    'Rust' Armorer, Atty Responsible For Text Leak, Judge Rules

    A New Mexico judge declined Wednesday to dismiss the involuntary manslaughter case against "Rust" film weapons expert Hannah Gutierrez-Reed, finding that she and her attorney are to blame for a leak of their private cellphone communications.

  • February 14, 2024

    Deputy AG Warns Of Harsher Penalties For Crimes Aided By AI

    Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco on Wednesday said the U.S. Department of Justice will seek harsher penalties for crimes committed with the aid of artificial intelligence, calling the technology a "double-edged sword" that can be exploited by criminals but utilized by prosecutors with the right controls in place.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Man Charged With Falsely Claiming To Own Iconic Hotel

    A New York man has been charged with falsely claiming to own a celebrated New York hotel for four years, Manhattan District Attorney Alvin L. Bragg Jr. said on Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ex-Cognizant Execs Fight Co.'s Bid To Shield Bribe Evidence

    Two former Cognizant executives have called on a New Jersey federal court to reject the company's attempt to shield evidence related to a purported bribe as the executives face a criminal trial over a separate bribery scheme.

  • February 14, 2024

    Atty For Ex-Trump Official Accused Of Leaking Deposition

    The plaintiff in a federal fraud suit against a former Trump administrative State Department official and a Philadelphia attorney wants the defendants' attorney sanctioned and tossed from the case after the attorney allegedly shared depositions marked confidential with a third-party witness.

  • February 14, 2024

    Feds Get Pause Of Fla. Malpractice Suit Amid Criminal Case

    A Florida federal judge has put a malpractice lawsuit against a New York attorney on hold while federal prosecutors pursue a securities fraud case against the lawyer's former client in Pennsylvania.

  • February 14, 2024

    Ex-Atty Can't Delay Prison Amid Pot Bribe Appeal, Judge Says

    A Boston federal judge on Wednesday shot down a former Massachusetts attorney's request to put off his 24-month prison sentence while appealing his conviction for bribing a local police chief to boost his client's retail cannabis application.

  • February 14, 2024

    US Marshals Service Director Warns Of Threats To Judges

    The director of the U.S. Marshals Service told lawmakers on Wednesday that the current threat environment for federal judges is a "substantial risk to our democracy."

  • February 13, 2024

    Colo. Justices Struggle To Draw Lines On Jury Race Bias Rule

    Colorado Supreme Court justices acknowledged Tuesday that current rules allow prosecutors to improperly strike people of color from juries for reasons linked to their race, but they grappled with whether they could revise the standard without going too far.

  • February 13, 2024

    BofA Unit Hit With Trader's Suit Over Alleged Spoofing

    A Bank of America unit faces a trader's proposed class action seeking to hold it liable for allegedly manipulating markets for U.S. Treasury futures and options after the firm paid a $24 million fine to the U.S. Financial Industry Regulatory Authority over the same alleged misconduct.

  • February 13, 2024

    'She Didn't Ask, And I Didn't Tell,' Ex Says Of Fraud Scheme

    Both federal prosecutors and defense counsel for a Georgia woman accused of using her small business to hide hundreds of thousands of dollars in illegally obtained pandemic loans agreed Tuesday that her ex-husband was not just a philanderer, but a fraudster to boot.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Securities Litigation Issues To Watch In 2024

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    There is yet another exciting year ahead for securities litigation, starting with the U.S. Supreme Court hearing argument next week in a case presenting a key securities class action question that has eluded review for the last eight years, say attorneys at Willkie.

  • Expect National Security Scrutiny Of Higher Ed To Continue

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    In 2023, the federal government significantly elevated the national security responsibilities of academic communities, so universities and research laboratories should take a more rigorous approach to research partnerships, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Anti-Money Laundering Compliance Must Put Officers On Alert

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    Recent government actions against FTX and other crypto companies have put a laser focus on corporate compliance failures, with added pressure on compliance officers — making the need for personal risk assessment particularly acute given today's novel anti-money laundering issues, say Poppy Alexander at Constantine Cannon and Caleb Hayes-Deats at MoloLamken.

  • What To Know About FCA Cybersecurity Enforcement

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    Now is a good time for practitioners, government contractors and potential relators to review recent developments in cybersecurity-related False Claims Act enforcement, and consider best practices for navigating this space in the new year, say Ellen London at London & Stout, and Li Yu and Molly Knobler at DiCello Levitt.

  • Opinion

    Stronger Attorney Rules Are Needed To Avoid A Jan. 6 Repeat

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    Given the key role lawyers played in the events leading up to the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection, the legal profession must shore up its rules before this year’s presidential election to make clear that lawyers who undermine the rule of law will face severe penalties, including disbarment, says Ray Brescia at Albany Law School.

  • What One Litigator Learned Serving On A Jury

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    Kilpatrick attorney April Isaacson shares insights for trial lawyers from her recent experience serving on a jury for the first time, including lessons about the impact of frequent sidebars, considerations for using demonstratives, the importance of clear jury instructions, and the unconscious habits that can drive jurors mad.

  • 4 Legal Ethics Considerations For The New Year

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    As attorneys and clients reset for a new year, now is a good time to take a step back and review some core ethical issues that attorneys should keep front of mind in 2024, including approaching generative artificial intelligence with caution and care, and avoiding pitfalls in outside counsel guidelines, say attorneys at HWG.

  • Bribery Settlement Gives Insight On DOJ Policies

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    Chemical company Albemarle’s recent $218 million settlement with the government to resolve foreign bribery claims provides valuable data points for companies on the U.S. Department of Justice’s voluntary self-disclosure policy and its clawback pilot program, say Michael DeBernardis and Tiauna Mathieu at Hughes Hubbard.

  • SEC Case May Expand Scope Of Insider Trading Liability

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's first-of-its-kind enforcement action against an individual in a case involving "shadow trading" demarcates an expansion of insider trading liability to circumstances in which there is a market connection between the source of information and the issuer of the securities traded, say attorneys at Steptoe.

  • Securities Question Stands After Contradicting Crypto Rulings

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    The debate about the regulation of crypto-assets came to a head in 2023 when two New York federal judges came to opposite conclusions about whether crypto-assets were securities by using the Howey test, highlighting the uncertainty facing the crypto industry as it seeks to resolve definitional questions, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • What Last Year's Trends Mean For Compliance In 2024

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    In 2023, compliance teams grappled with questions related to artificial intelligence, data analytics and corporate culture — trends that are likely to become even more prominent in the year to come, says Hui Chen at Ropes & Gray.

  • What The Law Firm Of The Future Will Look Like

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    As the legal landscape shifts, it’s become increasingly clear that the BigLaw business model must adapt in four key ways to remain viable, from fostering workplace flexibility to embracing technology, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • 4 PR Pointers When Your Case Is In The News

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    Media coverage of new lawsuits exploded last year, demonstrating why defense attorneys should devise a public relations plan that complements their legal strategy, incorporating several objectives to balance ethical obligations and advocacy, say Nathan Burchfiel at Pinkston and Ryan June at Castañeda + Heidelman.

  • SDNY Ruling Highlights Fed's Broad Master Account Power

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    In denying a Puerto Rican bank’s recent motion for injunction against the New York Fed, a New York federal court went beyond the specifics of the case in holding that financial institutions have no statutory right to a master account with a Federal Reserve bank, emphasizing the Fed’s unilateral discretion in these matters, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • 4 Ways The DOJ Is Changing Its Approach To Insider Trading

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s recent increased focus on insider trading cases and the manner in which the DOJ is pursuing prosecutions reflect a break from historical practices and signal that the DOJ is branching into new areas to pursue perceived illicit trading activities, say attorneys at Davis Wright.

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