White Collar

  • February 13, 2024

    Convicted NC Doctor Can't Get Recordings From Prosecutors

    A North Carolina federal judge on Tuesday rejected a doctor's attempt to force prosecutors to turn over recorded phone calls with a telemedicine provider, finding that the requested materials weren't relevant and that she was trying to "manufacture" a way to have her fraud conviction overturned.

  • February 13, 2024

    Ex-Atty Appealing Pot Bribe Conviction Says Prison Can Wait

    A former Massachusetts attorney convicted over an alleged cannabis licensing quid pro quo told a Boston federal judge Tuesday that multiple close-call legal issues warrant a delay of his 24-month prison sentence until the First Circuit decides his forthcoming appeal.

  • February 13, 2024

    Feds Defend Search Warrants In Sen. Menendez Bribery Probe

    The federal government shot back at a bid by U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez and businessman Wael Hana to nix gold bars and other evidence uncovered while pursuing its second corruption case against the New Jersey Democrat, arguing in an opposition brief Monday that the search warrants were complete and sufficiently narrow.

  • February 13, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A pizza chain, an energy company, a medical-device maker and a Manila casino were all hit with book-and-record demands last week in Delaware's Court of Chancery. A shoe company also walked away from a shareholder suit, two cryptocurrency companies tallied the costs of a broken merger, and three cigarette giants argued over Florida settlement payments.

  • February 13, 2024

    Troutman Pepper Faces One Of Kwok Trustee's Clawbacks

    The trustee overseeing Chinese exile Ho Wan Kwok's Chapter 11 case has filed an adversary complaint against Troutman Pepper Hamilton Sanders LLP in a Connecticut bankruptcy court, saying Kwok transferred almost $2 million in prepetition funds and more than $80,000 in post-petition funds to the firm through his shell companies.

  • February 13, 2024

    Ex-IRS Contractor Appeals 5-Year Sentence For Tax Info Leak

    A former IRS contractor sentenced to five years in prison for stealing and leaking former President Donald Trump's tax returns — and those of thousands of other wealthy people — to the media told a D.C. federal court he will appeal his final judgment.

  • February 13, 2024

    6 Sentenced For $20M COVID Aid Fraud Scheme

    Six Texas men have been sentenced to prison for their roles in a scheme to bilk over $20 million from the U.S. Small Business Administration using fraudulent applications for financial aid during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • February 13, 2024

    Detroit Judge Staves Off Ethics Charge Over Lying Witness

    Michigan's judicial watchdog fully dismissed Monday an ethics complaint against a Detroit judge alleging he facilitated perjury from a confidential informant while he was a prosecutor, though two commissioners said there was evidence to support that he lied about knowing the informant's true motivations.

  • February 12, 2024

    Longtime Jones Day Antitrust Atty Joins Crowell & Moring

    Crowell & Moring LLP announced Tuesday that a veteran Jones Day antitrust attorney with nearly 25 years of experience working on major cartel investigations and class actions joined the firm's Los Angeles office as a partner.

  • February 12, 2024

    'Pig Butchering' Scheme Took Down Small Bank, Fed IG Says

    The July collapse of a Kansas community bank appears tied to a type of crypto scam known as pig butchering, enabled by a failure of internal controls that allowed its former CEO to allegedly siphon off enough money to force the bank's closure, according to a new report by a bank regulatory watchdog.

  • February 12, 2024

    Canadian Admits To Aiding Illicit Russian Export Scheme

    A Canadian woman on Monday admitted to laundering funds from what prosecutors say was a scheme to evade U.S. sanctions by secretly exporting millions of dollars in sensitive technology to Russia, some of which has been used in the war against Ukraine.

  • February 12, 2024

    Bribery Is Not Securities Fraud, FirstEnergy Tells 6th Circ.

    FirstEnergy Corp. is asking the Sixth Circuit to overturn class certification in a case accusing the company of committing securities fraud in connection with a multimillion-dollar bribe made to a convicted politician, arguing that "half-truths" about the company's aging power plants cannot be the basis of class-wide claims.

  • February 12, 2024

    SEC Says Long Islander Aided $2M 'Free Riding' Scam

    A Long Island 25-year-old has agreed to settle U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission allegations that he played a key role in a $2 million "free riding" scheme to take advantage of "instant deposit" credits offered by broker-dealer firms.

  • February 12, 2024

    Fani Willis' DQ From Trump Case 'Possible,' Ga. Judge Says

    The Georgia state judge presiding over the election interference case against former President Donald Trump said Monday that "it's possible" Fulton County District Attorney Fani T. Willis' admitted relationship with a top prosecutor on the case could end in her disqualification, and is allowing a hearing on the issue planned for this week to go forward.

  • February 12, 2024

    Man Who Laundered $30M Gets 18 Years After Fiery Hearing

    An Atlanta man was sentenced to 18 years in prison Monday for his role in a $30 million money-laundering scheme following a heated two-day hearing in which he became so argumentative that the overseeing judge reminded him he'd been a lawyer longer than the man had been alive.

  • February 12, 2024

    Judge Tells DOJ, VW To Plan For Release Of Jones Day Docs

    A California federal judge has instructed the U.S. Department of Justice and Volkswagen to come up with a plan to release certain confidential Volkswagen documents that were part of a Jones Day investigation into the automaker's 2015 emissions-cheating scandal.

  • February 12, 2024

    TradeStation Fined By FINRA For Supervisory Failures

    Broker-dealer TradeStation Securities agreed to pay $700,000 to the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority to settle claims that it failed to properly use anti-money laundering programs to alert the firm of suspicious trading by its customers, and that it did not implement proper procedures for the sales of certain securities.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ex-CEO Of Health Co. Found Guilty Of Fraud After $195M Loss

    An Illinois federal jury on Monday found the former chief executive officer of a healthcare company guilty on all 13 criminal charges brought by the federal government alleging his company tricked consumers into purchasing health insurance that didn't cover what the company promised.

  • February 12, 2024

    Colo. Public Defender's Office Hit By Computer Hack

    The Office of the Colorado State Public Defender said Monday it has shut down its computer network following a cybersecurity breach.

  • February 12, 2024

    Katten Says It Can't Be Forced To Stay In Madoff Suit

    Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP told a New York bankruptcy judge that the difficulties the trustee for Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities may have in a suit to claw back $2 billion in transfers do not justify keeping the firm on the case for years with no prospect of pay.

  • February 12, 2024

    Flagstar Takes Aim At 'Nonsensical' $3M Signature Fraud Suit

    Flagstar Bank has urged a New York federal judge to toss a cash advance lender's suit that seeks millions of dollars allegedly stolen from its account at Signature Bank years before the bank failed, saying the theory that Flagstar should be on the hook for Signature's liabilities as its acquirer is "nonsensical."

  • February 12, 2024

    Crypto Pastor Enlisted Family For Scam, Colo. Officials Say

    A pastor accused of running a fraudulent cryptocurrency scheme targeting Christians also recruited his father, in-laws and other church leaders to sell the worthless coin in exchange for commissions of up to $32,500, Colorado's securities commissioner said Monday.

  • February 12, 2024

    Drivers Who Ran JFK Airport Taxi Line Hack Scam Get Prison

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced two drivers from Queens, New York, to prison Monday after they admitted joining with Russian hackers to compromise JFK Airport's taxi dispatch system, charging other drivers $10 each — $323,000 in total — to cut the line.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ex-Madigan Aide Gets 2.5 Years For Lying In Grand Jury Probe

    Former Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan's longtime chief of staff was sentenced to 30 months in federal prison Monday for lying to a grand jury that was investigating his former boss's relationship with lobbyist and confidant Michael McClain.

  • February 12, 2024

    NJ Lands $6.4M Deal Over 'Bogus' Medicare Billing Claims

    New Jersey Attorney General Matthew Platkin announced Monday that his office and the Garden State's insurance fraud prosecutor have obtained a $6.4 million consent judgment against the late owner of a mental health clinic chain accused of defrauding Medicaid with "an elaborate bogus-billing scheme."

Expert Analysis

  • Charting The Course For Digital Assets In 2024

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    Although 2023 was a tough year for the digital asset industry, upcoming court decisions, legislation and regulatory action will bring clarity, allowing the industry to expand and evolve, and the government will decide what innovation it will allow without challenge, says Joshua Smeltzer at Gray Reed.

  • Law Firm Strategies For Successfully Navigating 2024 Trends

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    Though law firms face the dual challenge of external and internal pressures as they enter 2024, firms willing to pivot will be able to stand out by adapting to stakeholder needs and reimagining their infrastructure, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Consultants.

  • The Most-Read Legal Industry Law360 Guest Articles Of 2023

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    A range of legal industry topics drew readers' attention in Law360's Expert Analysis section this year, from associate retention strategies to ethical billing practices.

  • Inside Higher Education's New FCA Liability Challenges

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    As the educational sector expands its use of government funding, schools are at increased risk under the False Claims Act, but recent settlements offer valuable lessons about new theories of liability they may face and specific procedures to reduce their exposure, say James Zelenay and Jeremy Ochsenbein at Gibson Dunn.

  • HHS Advisory Highlights Free Product Inducement Risks

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    A recent U.S. Department of Health and Human Services advisory opinion highlights concerns that valuable free products and other inducements may influence patients and providers to choose one manufacturer’s product over another, notwithstanding that such free healthcare products may be a benefit, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

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    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • Bribery Bill Fills Gap In Foreign Corruption Enforcement

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    Congress recently passed the Foreign Extortion Prevention Act, significantly expanding the U.S. government's ability to prosecute foreign officials who seek or demand bribes, but if enacted, the legislation could also create tension with other nations, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray and Mayer Brown.

  • 9th Circ. Scienter Ruling May Strengthen FDA's Leverage

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    A recent Ninth Circuit decision in U.S. v. Marschall — regarding scienter and violations of the Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act — appears to give the U.S. Food and Drug Administration another arrow in its quiver to lob in the direction of any repeat offender, with potentially very broad applications, say Elena Quattrone and Zachary Taylor at Epstein Becker.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • Del. Dispatch: The 2023 Corporate Cases You Need To Know

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    Corporate and mergers and acquisitions litigation has continued at a fevered pace this year, with the Delaware courts addressing numerous novel issues with important practical implications, including officer exculpation and buyer aiding-and-abetting liability, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Contract Claims Recap: Termination and Accrual

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    Edward Arnold and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth Shaw examine three recent decisions that illustrate why contractors should consider, during the bidding process, impediments to their ability to meet contract requirements, and the need to track the accrual dates of individual claims that may arise during performance to avoid being time-barred.

  • Strategies For Wire Fraud Prevention As Risk Is On The Rise

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    Wire transfer fraud is increasingly affecting investment managers, nonbank fintech companies and their clients, but there are steps financial institutions can take to mitigate this increasing risk, like testing cybersecurity effectiveness and sending fake phishing emails, says Casey Jennings at Seward & Kissel.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • 5 Gifts That May Run Afoul Of Government Ethics Rules

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    As the holiday season ramps up, it’s essential to keep in mind that government officials and employees are all subject to specific gift rules, and related violations can lead to consequences far worse than coal in one’s stocking, say Mark Renaud and Rob Walker at Wiley.

  • A Look At FedNow Liability Allocation And A 4th Circ. Toss-Up

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    Dsu-Wei Yuen and Andrew Lorentz at Davis Wright break down the current legal requirements that are directly applicable to common electronic payment systems like FedNow and Automated Clearing House and how they could be affected by a decision in Studco v. 1st Advantage Credit Union, currently on appeal in the Fourth Circuit.

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