White Collar

  • February 12, 2024

    Judge Tells DOJ, VW To Plan For Release Of Jones Day Docs

    A California federal judge has instructed the U.S. Department of Justice and Volkswagen to come up with a plan to release certain confidential Volkswagen documents that were part of a Jones Day investigation into the automaker's 2015 emissions-cheating scandal.

  • February 12, 2024

    TradeStation Fined By FINRA For Supervisory Failures

    Broker-dealer TradeStation Securities agreed to pay $700,000 to the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority to settle claims that it failed to properly use anti-money laundering programs to alert the firm of suspicious trading by its customers, and that it did not implement proper procedures for the sales of certain securities.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ex-CEO Of Health Co. Found Guilty Of Fraud After $195M Loss

    An Illinois federal jury on Monday found the former chief executive officer of a healthcare company guilty on all 13 criminal charges brought by the federal government alleging his company tricked consumers into purchasing health insurance that didn't cover what the company promised.

  • February 12, 2024

    Colo. Public Defender's Office Hit By Computer Hack

    The Office of the Colorado State Public Defender said Monday it has shut down its computer network following a cybersecurity breach.

  • February 12, 2024

    Katten Says It Can't Be Forced To Stay In Madoff Suit

    Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP told a New York bankruptcy judge that the difficulties the trustee for Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities may have in a suit to claw back $2 billion in transfers do not justify keeping the firm on the case for years with no prospect of pay.

  • February 12, 2024

    Flagstar Takes Aim At 'Nonsensical' $3M Signature Fraud Suit

    Flagstar Bank has urged a New York federal judge to toss a cash advance lender's suit that seeks millions of dollars allegedly stolen from its account at Signature Bank years before the bank failed, saying the theory that Flagstar should be on the hook for Signature's liabilities as its acquirer is "nonsensical."

  • February 12, 2024

    Crypto Pastor Enlisted Family For Scam, Colo. Officials Say

    A pastor accused of running a fraudulent cryptocurrency scheme targeting Christians also recruited his father, in-laws and other church leaders to sell the worthless coin in exchange for commissions of up to $32,500, Colorado's securities commissioner said Monday.

  • February 12, 2024

    Drivers Who Ran JFK Airport Taxi Line Hack Scam Get Prison

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced two drivers from Queens, New York, to prison Monday after they admitted joining with Russian hackers to compromise JFK Airport's taxi dispatch system, charging other drivers $10 each — $323,000 in total — to cut the line.

  • February 12, 2024

    Ex-Madigan Aide Gets 2.5 Years For Lying In Grand Jury Probe

    Former Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan's longtime chief of staff was sentenced to 30 months in federal prison Monday for lying to a grand jury that was investigating his former boss's relationship with lobbyist and confidant Michael McClain.

  • February 12, 2024

    NJ Lands $6.4M Deal Over 'Bogus' Medicare Billing Claims

    New Jersey Attorney General Matthew Platkin announced Monday that his office and the Garden State's insurance fraud prosecutor have obtained a $6.4 million consent judgment against the late owner of a mental health clinic chain accused of defrauding Medicaid with "an elaborate bogus-billing scheme."

  • February 12, 2024

    FTX Says User Agreements Don't Sink $157M Clawback

    A lawsuit to recoup cryptocurrency withdrawn from defunct trading platform FTX Trading Ltd. in the run-up to its Chapter 11 bankruptcy shouldn't be tossed, FTX told a Delaware bankruptcy court, saying the court can't determine who owned the $157.3 million of digital assets held in customer accounts at the motion to dismiss stage.

  • February 12, 2024

    Harvard Not Liable For Alleged Morgue Body Part Sales

    A Massachusetts judge ruled Monday that a state law makes Harvard University immune from a dozen lawsuits seeking to hold it liable after a former medical school morgue manager was criminally charged with stealing and selling body parts. 

  • February 12, 2024

    Musk Can't Dodge SEC Questions About $44B Twitter Buy

    A California federal judge has told Elon Musk that he must appear before the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to testify about his $44 billion purchase of the social media platform formerly known as Twitter, waving off the billionaire's assertions that the agency was harassing him via a series of seemingly endless investigations.

  • February 12, 2024

    2 Jurors Say They Were Pressured To Convict Ex-BVI Premier

    Two Florida jurors who helped convict Andrew Fahie, a former premier of the British Virgin Islands, on drug trafficking-related charges came forward shortly after they were discharged Thursday to say they were pressured to vote guilty, putting the case in what the judge called the "worst-case scenario" at a hearing Monday.

  • February 12, 2024

    Siblings Fail To Escape SEC's $112M Pump-And-Dump Suit

    A brother and sister named in a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission case concerning an alleged pump-and-dump scheme that defrauded investors of $112 million failed to escape the suit after a Texas federal judge ruled that the SEC successfully showed that the siblings had at least a general awareness of their role in the scheme, among other things.

  • February 12, 2024

    Prosecutors Say Paxton Can't Alter History To 'Dodge' Fraud Case

    Prosecutors have urged a Texas state court to reject a bid from state Attorney General Ken Paxton to dismiss a 2015 securities fraud case against him on speedy trial grounds, saying he is attempting to rewrite history and use delays he helped create to "dodge prosecution."

  • February 12, 2024

    Discord Stock Traders Say Prosecutors' Evidence Is Faulty

    A group of men accused of operating a multimillion-dollar pump-and-dump scheme on Discord and other social media asked a Texas federal judge to sanction the government, saying that prosecutors had cherry-picked evidence to create exhibits that are misleading at best and inaccurate at worst.

  • February 12, 2024

    Trump Turns To Supreme Court In DC Criminal Case

    Former President Donald Trump asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday to stay a D.C. Circuit panel's ruling that he is not immune from federal charges of interfering in the 2020 presidential election, arguing the D.C. Circuit needs more time to properly review his bid to escape prosecution.

  • February 12, 2024

    Lotto Scammer Impersonated SDNY Criminal Chief, Feds Say

    A Costa Rican national was charged with impersonating law enforcement officials, including the chief of the criminal division of the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York, as part of a scheme to trick elderly victims into wiring him millions under the false pretense that they'd won a lottery prize.

  • February 12, 2024

    Frank Execs Say JPMorgan Is Withholding Communications

    Charlie Javice and Olivier Amar, the indicted former executives of student loan startup Frank, asked a Manhattan federal judge Saturday for an extension of time to decide on raising an advice-of-counsel defense at their trial, saying they can't make a decision yet because JPMorgan is withholding discovery of their communications with Frank's general counsel.

  • February 12, 2024

    Viking Energy Shareholder Says Merger Was For CEO's Gain

    The former CEO of Texas energy company Viking Energy Group Inc. has been slapped with a proposed shareholder class action claiming he pursued a merger with a "financially troubled" shell company in order to provide himself with an exponentially greater claim of Viking's economic value.

  • February 12, 2024

    Jury Convicts 3 Of $7.9M COVID Aid Fraud Scheme

    A Manhattan federal jury convicted three people of perpetrating a scheme to bilk $7.9 million from the U.S. Small Business Administration through COVID-19 relief applications submitted in other people's names.

  • February 12, 2024

    Fla. Atty Wants $300K COVID Relief Fraud Conviction Axed

    A Florida attorney convicted of conspiring to defraud a U.S. coronavirus pandemic relief program has asked a Georgia federal judge to vacate the jury's guilty verdict and either acquit her or order a new trial, arguing the government violated her due process rights by not submitting sufficient evidence to prove her guilt.

  • February 12, 2024

    Like 'Fiction': 3 Netted In FirstEnergy Plant Bailout Scandal

    Two former FirstEnergy Corp. executives and the onetime chair of Ohio's utility regulator allegedly stole money from the company as they helped carry out the massive bribery scheme behind a controversial $1.3 billion bailout for two nuclear energy plants, according to an indictment one prosecutor on Monday said read like fiction.

  • February 11, 2024

    Rise In Billing For Catheters May Signal $2B Medicare Fraud

    Seven companies may have fraudulently billed Medicare by as much as $2 billion over two years for medical supplies that were never requested or received, according to an analysis by a Washington, D.C.-based group representing healthcare providers.

Expert Analysis

  • Navigating Asset Tracing Challenges In Bankruptcy

    Author Photo

    A Virginia court’s recent ruling in Health Diagnostic Laboratory Inc.'s bankruptcy highlights the heightened demand for asset tracing and the strategic use of the lowest intermediate balance rule in recovering funds from commingled accounts, says Daniel Lowenthal at Patterson Belknap.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Reverse Proffers In Federal Criminal Cases Can Be A Win-Win

    Author Photo

    The increasingly popular reverse proffer — in which prosecutors disclose evidence to targets of a criminal investigation — can help the government test its case and persuade witnesses to cooperate, and can help defendants sharpen their strategies and obtain favorable deals by choosing to cooperate, say Jeffrey Martino and Byron Tuyay at Baker McKenzie.

  • Aviation Watch: Pilots Face Mental Health Catch-22

    Author Photo

    The recent case of an Alaska Airlines pilot who attempted to crash an airliner in flight highlights the dilemma facing federally licensed cockpit personnel who need psychological help, yet could lose their jobs if they seek it — but a long-running program may provide a solution, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • Trump NY Fraud Trial Shows Civil, Criminal Case Differences

    Author Photo

    Former President Donald Trump’s civil fraud trial currently unfolding in New York provides a reminder that civil bench trials can be just as damaging, if not more so, than criminal prosecutions, due to several key elements of civil litigation procedure, says retired attorney David Moskowitz.

  • How Purdue High Court Case Will Shape Ch. 11 Mass Injury

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent arguments in Harrington v. Purdue Pharma, addressing the authority of bankruptcy courts to approve nonconsensual third-party releases in Chapter 11 settlement plans, highlight the case's wide-ranging implications for how mass injury cases get resolved in bankruptcy proceedings, says George Singer at Holland & Hart.

  • How New Expert Rules Are Already Changing Court Decisions

    Author Photo

    Though not formally effective until last week, some courts have been relying for several years on amended federal rules clarifying judges’ gatekeeping role, so counsel should be prepared to justify their expert witnesses’ methodologies and expect additional motion practice on expert testimony admissibility, say Colleen Kenney and Daniel Kelly at Sidley.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

    Author Photo

    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • 1 Year In, Money Laundering Law Tweak May Have Big Impact

    Author Photo

    Despite receiving little attention, Congress' quiet extension of the statute of limitations for money laundering offenses involving foreign bribery offenses is a powerful prosecutorial tool that defense counsel can nevertheless counter by using certain pretrial challenges, says attorney Andrew Feldman.

  • New Regs Will Strengthen Voluntary Carbon Offset Market

    Author Photo

    Voluntary carbon offsets are a vital tool for organizations seeking to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions — and recent efforts by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the state of California and others are essential to enhancing the reliability and authenticity of carbon credits, says David Smith at Manatt.

  • 2nd Circ. Defamation Ruling May Chill NY Title IX Reports

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit’s recent decision, holding accusers in Connecticut Title IX sexual misconduct cases are not immune to defamation claims, means that New York higher education institutions should reassess whether their disciplinary hearing procedures both protect due process and encourage victim and witness participation, says Nicole Donatich at Cullen and Dykman.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

    Author Photo

    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

    Author Photo

    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the White Collar archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!