White Collar

  • February 20, 2024

    SEC Zeroes In On SolarWinds Exec In Revised Complaint

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has doubled down on its case accusing software provider SolarWinds Corp. of failing to warn the public about the cybersecurity vulnerabilities that gave rise to a 2020 hack, providing a New York federal court with more detail about the involvement of the company's chief information security officer in the alleged cover-up.

  • February 20, 2024

    Bankrupt Co. Stole $100M In Special Needs Trusts, Suit Says

    The parents of a disabled child claim the founders and financial entities behind a now-bankrupt corporate trustee orchestrated a decadelong predatory scheme to misappropriate more than $100 million of special needs trust assets, according to a proposed class action filed Monday in Florida federal court.

  • February 20, 2024

    Epstein's Attorney, Accountant Accused Of Aiding Trafficking

    Two survivors of sexual predator Jeffrey Epstein claim his longtime lawyer and accountant played essential parts in the disgraced financier's sex trafficking enterprise by creating a complex financial infrastructure to keep the money flowing, according to a proposed class action filed in New York federal court.

  • February 20, 2024

    Software Engineer Gets 6 Months For Twilio Insider Trading

    A Bay Area man will spend six months in prison and forfeit over $130,000 after pleading guilty to trading on inside information about customer engagement platform Twilio Inc.

  • February 20, 2024

    US Chamber Urges 6th Circ. To Ax FirstEnergy Class Cert.

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, former U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission officials and others have urged the Sixth Circuit to reverse class certification in a case accusing FirstEnergy Corp. of committing securities fraud in connection with a multimillion-dollar bribe made to a convicted politician.

  • February 20, 2024

    Bank's Ex-Employees Must Face Trade Secrets Suit

    A Texas federal judge refused on Tuesday to toss the bulk of trade secret claims against a group of former employees of a company that eventually became Centennial Bank, but he did agree to trim some claims.

  • February 20, 2024

    FinCEN Details Owner Data Access Rules For Small Banks

    The U.S. Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network on Tuesday released a compliance guide for small financial firms on accessing and safeguarding company ownership information that their customers are required to report under recently implemented rules.

  • February 20, 2024

    Media Broker Gets 15 Months For Hiding $19.5M From IRS

    A media broker was sentenced to 15 months in prison Tuesday after admitting she concealed $19.5 million in income from the Internal Revenue Service.

  • February 20, 2024

    11th Circ. Tosses Appeal Of Bid-Rigging Indictment

    The Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday found that a concrete executive has to wait until after he's tried to contest his indictment by a remotely convened grand jury during the pandemic on charges of allegedly fixing prices and rigging bids for ready-mix concrete in Georgia.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ga. Man Sentenced To 70 Mos. In $18M PPP Fraud Scheme

    A Georgia man has been sentenced to nearly six years in prison for his role in a scheme to illegally use phony Paycheck Protection Program applications to obtain more than $18 million in financial aid intended for small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • February 20, 2024

    How Future Litigators Are Training In A 'Flight Simulator'

    Law students who would traditionally experience only a few courtroom scenarios over a semester have begun working with programs that can provide an entire array of courtroom curveballs, thanks to large language model artificial intelligence technology.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ex-BigLaw Atty Avoids Prison For Ch. 11 Lies

    A former BigLaw partner on Tuesday was spared any prison time for lying to a New York bankruptcy court in his 2022 personal Chapter 11 case, in an attempt to shield his assets from creditors.

  • February 20, 2024

    Georgia Attorney Disbarred For Court Lies, Hiding Money

    The Supreme Court of Georgia has stripped an Atlanta-area attorney of her license to practice in the Peach State, ruling the drastic move was appropriate after the lawyer's years of lies to a state court regarding the location of $80,000 tied up in a contract dispute.

  • February 20, 2024

    Jurors' Death Penalty Views Not Tied To Race, Colo. Justices Say

    The Colorado Supreme Court on Tuesday unanimously rejected a Black man's efforts to reverse his 2008 murder conviction for a drive-by shooting, with the justices finding that prosecutors' dismissal of two Black jurors did not amount to improper racial bias.

  • February 20, 2024

    Trivest Can Seek 6th Circ. Review Of RICO Jurisdiction Ruling

    A Michigan federal judge will allow a Florida-based private equity firm to appeal a decision denying its bid to escape a Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act lawsuit scrutinizing its funding of a solar company accused of scamming customers.

  • February 20, 2024

    Binance, Prosecutors Urge Court To Affirm $4.3B Penalty

    Binance Holdings Ltd. and federal prosecutors have called on a Washington federal court to confirm a historic $4.3 billion penalty, including a $1.8 billion criminal fine and a $2.5 billion forfeiture, that the crypto exchange agreed to pay last fall when admitting to a series of banking and sanctions violations.  

  • February 20, 2024

    Pharma Co. Can Get D&O Coverage For Securities Suit

    A pharmaceutical company that developed a drug for rare genetic blood disorders is covered under a recent directors and officers policy for a securities class action, a Delaware state court ruled, rejecting its insurers' contention that the action was related to an SEC subpoena and thus fell under an older policy. 

  • February 20, 2024

    Warhol Faker Gets 37 Mos. As He Awaits Murder Trial

    A Massachusetts man who is awaiting trial for allegedly murdering his wife was sentenced Tuesday to just over three years in federal prison for a yearslong scheme to sell forged artworks purporting to be original Andy Warhol pieces.

  • February 20, 2024

    Steward Health CEO Accused Of $45M Dividend Fraud

    A California medical staffing agency says embattled Steward Health Care owes it a whopping $45 million, telling a Texas federal court that Steward CEO Ralph de la Torre should cough up part of the sum because he issued a $111 million fraudulent dividend even though his company was drowning in debt.

  • February 20, 2024

    New Yorker Writer Pans Subpoena Over Adams' Ties To Pastor

    A writer for The New Yorker said that being forced to testify about an indicted Brooklyn pastor's ties to Mayor Eric Adams would step on journalistic privilege, arguing that Manhattan federal prosecutors could instead rely on other sources.

  • February 20, 2024

    Sullivan & Cromwell Accused Of Aiding FTX Fraud

    Sullivan & Cromwell LLP has been accused of knowing about and helping facilitate the massive fraud that brought down cryptocurrency exchange FTX while serving as FTX's outside counsel, and profiting on the back end by overseeing FTX's ongoing bankruptcy, according to a racketeering lawsuit filed last week.

  • February 20, 2024

    Girardi Keese Trustee Recovers $1.8M In Fees For Exide Case

    A U.S. bankruptcy judge on Tuesday approved an agreement between the Girardi Keese bankruptcy trustee, a former attorney for the firm and the Mandell Law Firm to end an adversary proceeding connected to $1.8 million in attorney fees from a lawsuit over the toxic Exide battery plant in Vernon, California.

  • February 20, 2024

    Los Angeles FBI Head, Recused From Girardi Case, Retires

    The head of the FBI's Los Angeles office, who recused himself from investigations into indicted ex-lawyer Tom Girardi, has retired after nearly a year and a half in the post, the agency said Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    Alec Baldwin Seeks June Trial Date In 'Rust' Shooting

    Alec Baldwin's attorney urged a New Mexico judge Tuesday to set a June trial date for the actor on involuntary manslaughter charges in the shooting death of "Rust" cinematographer Halyna Hutchins.

  • February 20, 2024

    Former EDNY Prosecutor, Bomb Expert Joins McGuireWoods

    McGuireWoods LLP has added a former federal prosecutor with the Eastern District of New York as counsel in the government investigations and white collar litigation department in North Carolina and Washington, D.C. Garen Marshall — a former bomb expert with the U.S. Navy — spoke to Law360 Pulse about joining the military-friendly firm.

Expert Analysis

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • How High Court SEC Case Could Affect The ITC

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    While the U.S. Supreme Court’s upcoming ruling in U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission v. Jarkesy will likely spare the U.S. International Trade Commission from major operative changes, the ITC’s ability to issue penalties for violations of its orders may change, say Gwendolyn Tawresey and Ryan Deck at Troutman Pepper.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • $32.4M Fine For Info Disclosure Is A Stark Warning For Banks

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    The New York State Department of Financial Services and the Federal Reserve's fining of a Chinese state-owned bank $32.4 million last month underscores the need for financial institutions to have policies and procedures in place to handle confidential supervisory information, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Lessons From Rare Post-Verdict Healthcare Fraud Acquittal

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    A Maryland federal court recently overturned a jury verdict that found a doctor guilty of healthcare fraud related to billing levels for COVID-19 tests, providing defense attorneys with potential strategies for obtaining acquittals in similar prosecutions, says attorney Andrew Feldman.

  • ChristianaCare Settlement Reveals FCA Pitfalls For Hospitals

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    ChristianaCare's False Claims Act settlement in December is the first one based on a hospital allegedly providing private physicians with free services in the form of hospital-employed clinicians and provides important compliance lessons as the government ramps up scrutiny of compensation arrangements, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

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    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • 3 Principles For Minimizing The Risk Of A Nuclear Verdict

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    In one of the latest examples of so-called nuclear verdicts, a single plaintiff was awarded $2.25 billion in a jury trial against Monsanto — revealing the need for defense attorneys to prioritize trust, connection and simplicity when communicating with modern juries, say Jenny Hergenrother and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Freight Forwarders And Common Carriers: Know Your Cargo

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    Freight forwarders and other nonprincipal parties involved in global cargo movement should follow the guidance in the multi-agency know-your-cargo compliance note to avoid enforcement actions should they fail to spot evasive tactics used in supply chains to circumvent U.S. sanctions and export controls, say attorneys at Venable.

  • Takeaways From 9th Circ. Nix Of Ex-GOP Rep.'s Conviction

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    The Ninth Circuit recently reversed the conviction of former Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, R-Neb., for lying to the FBI, showing that the court will rein in aggressive attempts by the government to expand the reach of criminal prosecutions — and deepening a circuit split on an important venue issue, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • A Closer Look At Novel Jury Instruction In Forex Rigging Case

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    After the recent commodities fraud conviction of a U.K.-based hedge fund executive in U.S. v. Phillips, post-trial briefing has focused on whether the New York federal court’s jury instruction incorrectly defined the requisite level of intent, which should inform defense counsel in future open market manipulation cases, say attorneys at Lankler Siffert.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

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    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.

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